Date   

Watch "Voyager 1 and 2 - 2018-2019 UPDATE - Narrated Documentary" on YouTube

Wes Mcdonald
 


Folks 

Pretty awesome.

Wes

https://youtu.be/xZIB8vauWSI


Re: Useful 3D printed parts for the Exos-2

Mike Leemhuis
 
Edited

Hi Pete.  I'll attach a picture of the clip part assuming that's the part you're talking about.  This part has a space at the bottom of the U that can control up to about 4 standard sized cables.  This would include the Dec and RA cables and perhaps 2 heater cables.  It clips onto the 2 inch diameter EXOS 2 leg to restrain the wires.  You then leave a loop in the wires so that the OTA can swing to all positions.  I hope that makes sense.  Let me know if I'm not understanding your question correctly.
 
Thanks,
Mike
 

On Sat, Sep 29, 2018 at 1:34 AM Peter Turner via Groups.Io <peteturner07=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi Mike,

Thanks for the update on PTEG.  Not knowing much about the 3D printer world I did some research on the different materials.  PTEG seemed to be better than ABS or PLA and certainly was much less expensive than Nylon.  After I've had more experience with the mount I may take you up on ideas.  One question, how do your cable parts work with the standard Dec and RA cables.  It didn't look in the picture as if you were using them.

Pete

 

 


--

Mike Leemhuis


Re: Useful 3D printed parts for the Exos-2

Peter Turner
 
Edited

Hi Mike,

Thanks for the update on PTEG.  Not knowing much about the 3D printer world I did some research on the different materials.  PTEG seemed to be better than ABS or PLA and certainly was much less expensive than Nylon.  After I've had more experience with the mount I may take you up on ideas.  One question, how do your cable parts work with the standard Dec and RA cables.  It didn't look in the picture as if you were using them.

Pete


Re: Useful 3D printed parts for the Exos-2

Mike Leemhuis
 

I might add that PETG is a great all around material for 3D-printing.  It's doesn't split or shrink while printing and can handle flexing.  It's very similar to ABS strength-wise but much easier to print.  Nylon is great for toughness and flexibility but very difficult to print and it's hydroscopic (absorbs moisture).  It's overkill for these kinds of parts.  PLA is barely adequate for parts under load. It's brittle and can deform if left in a hot car.  I wouldn't recommend it.  I've designed hundreds of plastic parts and PETG is the best material I've found thus far for parts like these.  Just my 2 cents!

Mike



On Fri, Sep 28, 2018 at 8:43 PM Mike Leemhuis <skislalom1@...> wrote:
Thanks Pete.  I'm glad you are finding my designs useful.  If you or anyone can think of any improvements or suggestions for other useful parts, I'd be glad to consider them.

Thanks to all,
Mike


On Fri, Sep 28, 2018 at 8:28 PM Peter Turner via Groups.Io <peteturner07=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi Jerry,

Thanks for the routine.  I'm fairly sure that the iphone's compass compensates for magnetic declination.  Here in Phoenix we have a magnetic declination of 12 degrees.  When I use the compass on the iphone's Utility app, it points to within a degree or two of Polaris.

Mike I'm impressed with your parts especially the cable holder and PMC-8 box holder.  They look like "must haves".  I just ordered the PMC-8 holder from 3D-Hubs.  I chose PETG as the material - have to see how strong it is.

Pete


--

Mike Leemhuis


Window size adjustment #ExploreStars

membtkd@...
 
Edited

Hi. I had installed ExploreStars on an Asus convertible tablet with keyboard. The issue is that the app launches in a maximized state, with no window frame / borders to resize the window border and access the Windows Search function. So I am unable to search any NGC , etc objects. Any input would be appreciated.  Apologies, forget to mention its a Windows 8.1 system. 


Re: Useful 3D printed parts for the Exos-2

Mike Leemhuis
 

Thanks Pete.  I'm glad you are finding my designs useful.  If you or anyone can think of any improvements or suggestions for other useful parts, I'd be glad to consider them.

Thanks to all,
Mike


On Fri, Sep 28, 2018 at 8:28 PM Peter Turner via Groups.Io <peteturner07=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi Jerry,

Thanks for the routine.  I'm fairly sure that the iphone's compass compensates for magnetic declination.  Here in Phoenix we have a magnetic declination of 12 degrees.  When I use the compass on the iphone's Utility app, it points to within a degree or two of Polaris.

Mike I'm impressed with your parts especially the cable holder and PMC-8 box holder.  They look like "must haves".  I just ordered the PMC-8 holder from 3D-Hubs.  I chose PETG as the material - have to see how strong it is.

Pete


--

Mike Leemhuis


Re: Useful 3D printed parts for the Exos-2

Peter Turner
 
Edited

Hi Jerry,

Thanks for the routine.  I'm fairly sure that the iphone's compass compensates for magnetic declination.  Here in Phoenix we have a magnetic declination of 12 degrees.  When I use the compass on the iphone's Utility app, it points to within a degree or two of Polaris.

Mike I'm impressed with your parts especially the cable holder and PMC-8 box holder.  They look like "must haves".  I just ordered the PMC-8 holder from 3D-Hubs.  I chose PETG as the material - have to see how strong it is.

Pete


Re: Useful 3D printed parts for the Exos-2

Larry White
 

I used an adjustable hose clamp.  I opened it all the way open and ran it over the top of the Velcro.  I wrapped the Velcro around the tripod leg and tightened the hose clamp over the Velcro.  Works great and didn’t starch the leg.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: ESPMC-Eight@groups.io <ESPMC-Eight@groups.io> on behalf of Winfield Moses via Groups.Io <chris_moses@...>
Sent: Thursday, September 27, 2018 6:39:31 PM
To: ESPMC-Eight@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Useful 3D printed parts for the Exos-2
 
Well, that sounds much easier than me doing it!  
I just got back from a trip and am still catching up on messages.  I'll go fin my micrometer!

On Thursday, September 27, 2018, 7:26:12 PM EDT, Mike Leemhuis <skislalom1@...> wrote:


If someone can tell me the G11 leg diameter I’d be happy to add a variation to my 2” EXOS 2 3D design that I published yesterday. 

Mike Leemhuis. 


On Sep 27, 2018, at 7:16 PM, Winfield Moses via Groups.Io <chris_moses@...> wrote:

I fully agree.  That is the only piece of the G-11 that seems sub-par.  Beside the sinking movement, I want everything on my mount ROCK SOLID.  Cables, cameras, etc....all the way down to the little things.


I was in a hurry.  I just used some of that quick drying clay-like stuff .  Molded it around the leg and then flattened the other side.  I keep meaning to measure the diameter and then 3d print a better solution.  If anyone knows the OD, let me know and I'll give it a shot.

On Thursday, September 27, 2018, 7:07:40 PM EDT, Robert Hoskin <devonshire@...> wrote:


Heh...    :-)
 
I don't like that velcro strap, either.  Much too inclined to sneak down the leg and past the spreader, with my PMC-8 sliding towards the ground while the legs are shifting around, as I level the mount.  
 
The plan (it's on my list...) is to put a wooden block on the spreader, with the aluminum wedge attached to its side, such that the PMC-8 box is held vertically, off the side of the spreader, and well above the ground.   
 
- Bob
    
 

--

Mike Leemhuis


Re: Useful 3D printed parts for the Exos-2

Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering
 
Edited

There is a somewhat quick way to do a polar alignment that uses the inherent accuracy of the mounts pointing to do a physical alignment that I have not really talked about. It really is a very simple procedure that I would like some feedback on. I think we get hung up some on using external camera systems and other programs or applications that solve this issue, but all you really need is your mount and your telescope. You can use a regular higher power eyepiece, anything less than 10 mm, or you can use a cross-hair eyepiece to make it a little better. 

So this is the procedure:
1.  Set up your mount and level it
2.  Make sure the mounts RA and DEC axis are zeroed and in the PARK position (the axis alignment arrows on the body of the mount, or equivalent, are aligned).
3.  IF you can see Polaris, point your mount using the Altitude and Azimuth mount adjustments so that when your telescope is PARKED, you can see Polaris in your eyepiece.
4.  ALTERNATIVELY, using a compass, point the mount towards the NCP compensating for the magnetic declination
5.  ALTERNATIVELY, using a level program on your phone, adjust the Altitude mount adjustment to set it to your Latitude value.
6.  Start the ExploreStars application and connect to the PMC-Eight
7.  Select an appropriate bright star from the alignment star list and slew to the star.
NOTE:  The following adjustment technique relies on the inherent raw pointing accuracy of the mount which includes any errors due to Cone Angle and other sources of flexure in the system.
8.  Using the Altitude and Azimuth mount adjustments, center the alignment star in your eyepiece. 
9.  The mount should be within 5 arc-minutes of the NCP now.
This is a formal explanation of the technique I have done in the field as a quick and dirty way to get the alignment close enough for visual use. It may also be good enough for astrophotography depending on the inherent accuracy of the mount, i.e., the G11 may get you closer than the EXOS 2 would.

Please report back on your success, or failure using this technique.


Jerry Hubbell
Director Electrical Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811
www.explorescientificusa.com



Re: Useful 3D printed parts for the Exos-2

Wes Mcdonald
 

Mike 

You. Are. The. Man.   

The ioptron app looks like a gem.  Loaded it up last night.  Man.  But the icing on the cake are your 3d printed parts.  I just ordered a full set from 3d Hubs.  2x clamps, pmc 8  mount, tray, and power distribution. ...in grey nylon...85$ delivered.  Fantastic.  If ABS the price would have been $30.  

Jerry, that pmc 8 clamp and cable clamps would be a nice addition to the product.  The tray also.  The tools in the ioptron app would be a great addition to explorestars...maybe the author would sell you rights to them.

Wes


Re: Useful 3D printed parts for the Exos-2

W. Christopher Moses
 

Well, that sounds much easier than me doing it!  
I just got back from a trip and am still catching up on messages.  I'll go fin my micrometer!

On Thursday, September 27, 2018, 7:26:12 PM EDT, Mike Leemhuis <skislalom1@...> wrote:


If someone can tell me the G11 leg diameter I’d be happy to add a variation to my 2” EXOS 2 3D design that I published yesterday. 

Mike Leemhuis. 


On Sep 27, 2018, at 7:16 PM, Winfield Moses via Groups.Io <chris_moses@...> wrote:

I fully agree.  That is the only piece of the G-11 that seems sub-par.  Beside the sinking movement, I want everything on my mount ROCK SOLID.  Cables, cameras, etc....all the way down to the little things.


I was in a hurry.  I just used some of that quick drying clay-like stuff .  Molded it around the leg and then flattened the other side.  I keep meaning to measure the diameter and then 3d print a better solution.  If anyone knows the OD, let me know and I'll give it a shot.

On Thursday, September 27, 2018, 7:07:40 PM EDT, Robert Hoskin <devonshire@...> wrote:


Heh...    :-)
 
I don't like that velcro strap, either.  Much too inclined to sneak down the leg and past the spreader, with my PMC-8 sliding towards the ground while the legs are shifting around, as I level the mount.  
 
The plan (it's on my list...) is to put a wooden block on the spreader, with the aluminum wedge attached to its side, such that the PMC-8 box is held vertically, off the side of the spreader, and well above the ground.   
 
- Bob
    
 

--

Mike Leemhuis


Re: Useful 3D printed parts for the Exos-2

Mike Leemhuis
 

If someone can tell me the G11 leg diameter I’d be happy to add a variation to my 2” EXOS 2 3D design that I published yesterday. 

Mike Leemhuis. 


On Sep 27, 2018, at 7:16 PM, Winfield Moses via Groups.Io <chris_moses@...> wrote:

I fully agree.  That is the only piece of the G-11 that seems sub-par.  Beside the sinking movement, I want everything on my mount ROCK SOLID.  Cables, cameras, etc....all the way down to the little things.


I was in a hurry.  I just used some of that quick drying clay-like stuff .  Molded it around the leg and then flattened the other side.  I keep meaning to measure the diameter and then 3d print a better solution.  If anyone knows the OD, let me know and I'll give it a shot.

On Thursday, September 27, 2018, 7:07:40 PM EDT, Robert Hoskin <devonshire@...> wrote:


Heh...    :-)
 
I don't like that velcro strap, either.  Much too inclined to sneak down the leg and past the spreader, with my PMC-8 sliding towards the ground while the legs are shifting around, as I level the mount.  
 
The plan (it's on my list...) is to put a wooden block on the spreader, with the aluminum wedge attached to its side, such that the PMC-8 box is held vertically, off the side of the spreader, and well above the ground.   
 
- Bob
    
 

--

Mike Leemhuis


Re: Useful 3D printed parts for the Exos-2

W. Christopher Moses
 

I fully agree.  That is the only piece of the G-11 that seems sub-par.  Beside the sinking movement, I want everything on my mount ROCK SOLID.  Cables, cameras, etc....all the way down to the little things.


I was in a hurry.  I just used some of that quick drying clay-like stuff .  Molded it around the leg and then flattened the other side.  I keep meaning to measure the diameter and then 3d print a better solution.  If anyone knows the OD, let me know and I'll give it a shot.

On Thursday, September 27, 2018, 7:07:40 PM EDT, Robert Hoskin <devonshire@...> wrote:


Heh...    :-)
 
I don't like that velcro strap, either.  Much too inclined to sneak down the leg and past the spreader, with my PMC-8 sliding towards the ground while the legs are shifting around, as I level the mount.  
 
The plan (it's on my list...) is to put a wooden block on the spreader, with the aluminum wedge attached to its side, such that the PMC-8 box is held vertically, off the side of the spreader, and well above the ground.   
 
- Bob
    
 


Re: Useful 3D printed parts for the Exos-2

 

Heh...    :-)
 
I don't like that velcro strap, either.  Much too inclined to sneak down the leg and past the spreader, with my PMC-8 sliding towards the ground while the legs are shifting around, as I level the mount.  
 
The plan (it's on my list...) is to put a wooden block on the spreader, with the aluminum wedge attached to its side, such that the PMC-8 box is held vertically, off the side of the spreader, and well above the ground.   
 
- Bob
    
 


Re: Useful 3D printed parts for the Exos-2

Cyril Bonnett
 

I have used a jubilee clamp with a piece of inner tube rubber to clamp the aluminium block to the leg.


Re: D or V series saddle for EXOS2 ?

Chip Louie <chiplouie@...>
 

Hi Wes,

I'm a happy user of both ADM and Losmandy tip-in style D/V saddles and I have owned various name brand CG4/5 GP/DP mounts and really recommend buying directly from ADM to be certain you get something that not only fits correctly but will also work correctly with the variation of drive motors for these mounts. There are more variations than you can imagine and unless you can confirm with the vendor it will work with your particular make and model mount chances are good it may not fit correctly. For example the last mount of this type I bought was a newer Orion SkyView-Pro with the non-GOTO dual axis drive. I ordered the ADM DV saddle that should fit and upon installation of the saddle adapter fit perfectly on the mount head but the DEC motor did not fit and could not be installed. After a conversation with Anthony he shipped me a different adapter part which also fit the mount perfectly but also did not allow the DEC motor to be installed correctly without modifications to the mount adapter. Anthony said this is a problem with these GC4/5 GP/DP mounts due to the multiple variations of these mounts.

My solution was to return both ADM kits and use some parts I was going to sell. I had a Losmandy D saddle that I had removed from my G11 and an unused Losmandy 7" VUP7 dovetail. Scott Losmandy was nice enough to mate these parts together for me while I was in the shop buying some more "stuff." I clamped this combination firmly into the stock mount head saddle using a couple of new stainless steel cap screws I had to cut to length for dovetail clearance. This allowed me to use the existing dual axis motors on the stock one piece saddle clamp as designed and still get a full size Losmandy saddle. BTW the full size saddle was major overkill but at the time cheap for me seeing that I already owned the parts. A lighter weight, lower cost variation much more suitable for these smaller mounts might be to use the Losmandy VUP4 and a Losmandy SPDV these parts are only $80 new, add a couple of stainless steel cap screws and you are there. Just a thought.

Chip 


Re: D or V series saddle for EXOS2 ?

Wes Mcdonald
 

Hi Chris:

I just saw your reply here.  the link to the ADM part is:
http://www.admaccessories.com/product/dual-gpdx-dual-series-saddle-fits-celestron-vixen-gpdx-mounts/

Didn't see an sku or such.

Wes.


Useful 3D printed parts for the Exos-2

Mike Leemhuis
 

Many of the early problems I had with my Exos-2 mount and ES 102CF OTA have been related to cables getting snagged or unplugged.  A snagged cable can cause the RA or DEC steppers to break phase and a loose USB connection will cause a loss of communication with the PMC-eight box.  These problems cause a lot of frustration and loss of valuable astrophotography time trying to find the problem then reconnecting and re-homing.  I should point out that I control my mount using CDC with my desktop computer inside my house and a 20 meter USB cable running to the telescope out in my front yard.  

I have pretty much solved these problems with several 3D printed parts that I designed.  A short description of each of these parts is included below along with a link to a more detailed description and a printable .stl file on thingiverse.com.  

1. A tray to hold my iPhone 7 parallel to the axis of the OTA so I can get fairly close polar alignment using the iOptron Polar Scope Align Pro
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3120190

2. A USB cable clamp to make sure this cable does not disconnect. 
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3120150

3. A 2 inch diameter snap-on leg clamp to control the stepper and/or heater cables.  I include a variation of this clamp which includes a simple power distribution panel.
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3120125

4. A leg clamp that firmly grips the Exos-2 leg and has a feature to slide on the PMC-eight box.  This replaces the aluminum block and velcro strap that comes with the PMC-eight.
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3120066

Anyway, I wanted to share these parts with all of you.  If you have a 3D printer, know someone who does or want to use the 3D printing services that exist online, you can print these and hopefully avoid some of the problems that I have dealt with.

Hope this helps!


Mike Leemhuis


Re: Noisy EXOS 2 PMC8?

Wes Mcdonald
 

Peter

There is something amiss with your calcs.  An 8x50 finder has a focal length probably between 160 and 200 mm. A 15mm eyepiece would have a mag of between 10 and 15.  The fov of a polosi eyepiece would then be it's apparent fov, say 50 degrees, divided by the magnification in this case about 5 to 3.5 degrees.  Perhaps you meant your main scope was at magnification 60?  In that case your 15mm would have about .8 degree fov.  

The following assumes you meant the 15mm was in your main scope.  If the Polaris is out to about a third of the finder then it is about a degree off of center.  That error is about just outside the 15mm eyepiece fov in your main scope (given numbers above). Note that if you used the 25 mm you would have a larger fov than the 15mm even though the apparent fov is less.  That's the eyepiece I would use to get things rolling along.  In fact I would use a 32 or 40 if you have one.  You can buy Meade series 4000 eyepieces for a song and they are decent for the money.  All are about 50 degrees apparent fov....not high tech.  Obvious you can spend a lot more and probably should as you advance.  In fact for shits and grins just to get a couple of low mag eyepieces you might pick up some really really cheap Meade MA eyepieces.  People please don't flame me I know they are very low end but we are talking alignment here.  

If your scope is a 7-8 f# you are going to want some low power eyepieces to view stuff like the double cluster.  Once you get going you.migjt get you some explorescientific 80degree boys at 30-40mm FL.

A telescope is very similar to a boat when it comes to money disappearing.  Haha.  If you want to keep your kids Out of trouble introduce them to astronomy...no money for anything else!

It does not surprise me the elevation scale is off.  That's why it's best to use a digital level like your phone app. But it would be good to get the mount level.  I have found the bubble level is about right...it's difficult to find surfaces to check level on.

The moon was full last night so stars were no doubt tough to see.  Next week things will be way easier.

I finally had a chance to listen to your mount.  Still not sure about it. It seems loud and i must say mine is not objectionable loud...in fact my daughter when she first heard it at the last star party remarked on how soft it was.  So yours is probably not right.  As others have pointed out it is not difficult to adjust.  When I had to do mine I got permission from es to do it and not void the warranty.  It's just faster.  But it is a bit of a pain.

Wes


Re: Noisy EXOS 2 PMC8?

Peter Turner
 

This comment is a little off the noise issue, however I think I'm going to call ES Customer Service but plan to wait a day or two and use the mount more. I definitely don't want to take the mount apart while it is under warranty.

Last night I got a better polar alignment, but was still unable to see Polaris in the polar scope.  I then used Steve Siedentop's method (which is much more user friendly than a polar scope) and was able to center Polaris. FYI: to get the elevation correct I used the front and back knobs while keeping the mount in the "Park" position. To center it I usedthe twist knobs on either side to center the star and did not use the direction arrows on the tablet. Note to Wes: The resulting elevation was 40 rather than the normal 33 for Phoenix. I going to use a different level to see if the mount's level is causing the elevation to be so far off.

After performing a three star alignment, I constantly got different objects in my finder scope but not the eyepiece.  The average distance from the 8x50 finder's center point was about halfway to the edge of the objective. My finder eyepiece is a 15mm, 1.25" which provides a magnification of 63 with a 58 degree field of view. I do have a 25mm plossl which has a mag of 38.  However it's FOV is only 40 so I rarely use it any more. One thing I am going to do is use my reticle eyepiece to center polaris if I can't view it in the polar scope tonight.

Brian, I hear the motors singing but only if I'm moving the mount at a rate 9, which I rarely do when getting the alignment correct.  When the mount is slewing to an alignment star the motors do not sing.

Pete

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