Date   

Re: Expected tracking times *Unguided #TECHNICAL #EXOS2

Wes Mcdonald
 

JB

PHD2 computes the guide requirements and sends them through ascom to the mount.  This is termed pulse guiding.  The data is sent to the mount via the communication method ASCOM has to the mount.  Please, Please, Please save yourself endless grief and go serial.  It is easy if you get the recommended gear.

Wes.


--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Re: Expected tracking times *Unguided #TECHNICAL #EXOS2

Wes Mcdonald
 

JB

If you are going to guide, you will want to use ASCOM and serial -- and if you do that forget about Explorestars.  It is not ASCOM compatible and probably won't be for some time to come.  But believe me, that is not a problem.  You can use Stellarium to visually pick stars, and it is fantastic.  You can load it on your Asus and play with it as a planetarium program and see what I mean.  Then just imagine that all you have to do is click on an object and send your scope to it.  Man.  It's nice.   

As you enter into this journey, please understand getting good astrophotographs is far from simple.  You will have to acquire much skill and knowledge -- about many different aspects of the technology involved -- to achieve great results.  This ain't no point and shoot hobby.  Part and parcel to this is the mount and its peculiarities, all the software and their own quirks, and the workflow necessary to get everything just right.  Not to mention the atmosphere, light pollution, and plain old weather.  These are all things that will come about but in a step by step process, with each new piece of knowledge or skill leading to improved results.  

As to guiding and focal lengths.

The rule of thumb for focal lengths being 4:1 is one of those things that is no better than free advice.  I will give you my understanding of things, which as always is possibly flawed in which case I welcome comment.

The deal is sort of this.  You will in general be able to guide your mount to an accuracy of about .3 or so pixels on your guide camera.  That means the guider will hold the guide star within an area about .3 pixels.  This is useful, but not adequate for understanding.  What we want is to hold the guide star to a position which limits its motion on the imaging camera pixel.  Soooo, we need to understand the relationship between the guider pixel and the imaging pixel size, but in image scale arc seconds) not in pixel size (microns).  

The pixel on an imager covers and angular extent of the sky.  The image scale of a pixel in arc seconds is given by the equation 
        
             Res = (P/F)*206.3

where Res is the arc second pixel scale or resolution, F is the scope focal length, and P is the pixel size in microns.

Your f4 guide scope has a focal length of 200mm.  If the guide camera pixel size is about 3.1 microns this gives you a pixel scale for the guider of about 3.2 arc seconds.  Thus you might expect the mount to guide to about 1 arc second.

Now the imaging camera is attached to a scope with a 750mm focal length.  Assume the camera, DSLR, has a 5.2 micron pixel.  Then the image scale for the DSLR and the 750mm scope is 1.43 arc seconds.  Not bad.  It would seem the guider will guide so as to keep the image within one pixel of the imaging camera. 

Set the Res of the camera =  .3*Res of the guide and solve for the ratio of the F...

           Pi/Fi = .3*Pg/Fg

Where Pi is the pixel size of the imager, Fi is the imager scope focal length, and the g subscript denotes the guider.  I have divided each side by the constant 206.3 factor.  

Then 

               3.3 (Fg/Fi) = Pg/Pi

and we want Pi/Pg to be about one. This happens when Fi/Fg is about 3.3:1.  So that's where 4:1 comes from.  

This is all wonderfullness but reality will set in.  PHD2, the guide camera, and the mount constitute a closed loop control system with its own set of dynamics.  This system is trying to control the position of a spot on the guide camera as the spot position is perturbed by many different effects...wind, refraction, atmospheric seeing, vibration, flexure, mount PA error, mount tracking rate error to name a few.  This is why perfect guiding is impossible. The Dance is to get the things you can manage correct, so that the closed loop system will be able to handle the things you cannot manage.  And like any dance, this takes time to get good at it.

So that is lesson 1.  Why is 4:1 suggested.  Its because things can only operationally track to a certain precision and we need to make that precision work with our imager. 

I started out with a 50mm, f4 guide scope and a guide camera with 5.2 micron pixels.  Didn't work as well as I needed, so I got a 60mm guide scope with a 280mm FL.  Better but I want more performance so I am going to go to smaller pixels in the guider one of these days.  You are starting out with a good guide camera pixel scale it seems so you are on the right track it appears.  If you get an imaging camera with smaller pixels than in the example above where I assumed 5.2 microns, you might find you will want to increase the guider FL.  Also, you may find you will want some more aperture to make more guide stars available.

ASI Air is something I would warn you off of if you are just getting started.  All of the software you need to get up and running is basically free by going the ASCOM route with PHD2, POTH, Stellarium, and BYN.  After you get good at using that, or at least schooled in its use, then consider spending the money.  

One nice thing about going wired to ASCOM is that you can use SkySafari on your iPhone or I think Android to control the mount at the same time you use Stellarium or any other program on the PC.  That is a subject I have posted on a lot, and will do so more in the future as needed. 

You will have to get good a polar aligning the mount.  The iEXOS100 needs a bit of help in that regard.  You can use SharpCap I think with your Nikon to get polar aligned if you can see Polaris.  If not you will need to get good at Drift Aligning or find software that will help you align without Polaris.

Finally, if your Nikon is old enough it will not allow shutter control in Bulb with the USB connection, you need a seperate shutter release cord.  BYN manages it for you but you will have to buy the thing.  It's easy to find out.  Just plug your camera into BYN and try to take a bulb exposure.  BYN will fuss if it cannot do so with the USB. If needed I can write an article about the shutter release cable.

You can test out scope control by Stellarium by using the scope simulator in POTH.  Do this.  It is just tricky enough to set up that you will want to do it when there is daylight and you have coffee, music, AC.  You will need to load a helper program called StellariumScope.  Configure Stellarium according to the instruction in StellariumScope and maybe in Stellarium's instructions.

Finally, put on your to-do list to figure out plate solving.  It will make your life a lot easier when you start trying to image deep space objects.  And you might look into Astro Photography Tool (APT) which integrates everything into one interface, and also integrates with Stellarium.

Regards,
Wes.


--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Re: Expected tracking times *Unguided #TECHNICAL #EXOS2

JB1983
 

Harry,  I was actually just looking at that unit. Seems a few people are using it now and having great success. Only other way I can think of running 2 wifi connections is maybe a wifi dongle via USB, if that even works.  Very cool piece of equipment for down the road, especially the winter months.

Chris,  good to know I ha my connections proper.  What I couldn't wrap my head around is how PHD2 communicates with the mount if there is no direct cabling from the guide scope to the mount itself, but if I'm not mistaken that's where ascom comes in to play?

Right now I'm trying to figure out my guide scope.  I know the imaging to guiding ratio should be around 1:4  so I've been looking at a 50mm f4 and a 60mm f4.6.  I think the 60mm with its 240mm focal length would probbaly be ideal at 750mm focal length of my scope with brings the ratio down to just a little over 1:3 with the asi120 mini and something like 1:2.99 with the asi290 mini.  Too bad it's a 200 dollar gap between the 2 cameras.  I'd like the 290, but my wallet says its gonna be the 120 lol


Re: Expected tracking times *Unguided #TECHNICAL #EXOS2

Chris Tardif
 

You are correct on your connections but consider that your PC won’t have access to the Internet if you’re using WIFI for the Explore Stars.  This can be achieved, but you need two networks on your PC and you might have to play with the IP configs.  Not impossible, but tricky. 

 

I don’t use the auto-guide port...if you have PHD working you don’t need it.  Please see Dylan O’Donnell’s video on how to properly deal with the ST4 cable....you can watch the whole thing, but the salient bit is at the 3:19 mark.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mt0luBLaHDw

 

EQ6R...*sigh*....The IEXOS-100 was always a starting point for me to see if I like this hobby....I just started....The EQ6R is on my list and the list is down  to two....little ‘r’ me if you want to take that offline.

 

christardif@...

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> on behalf of JB1983 <capnjake83@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 13, 2019 1:11:44 AM
To: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Expected tracking times *Unguided
 

[Edited Message Follows]

Thanks for the information and sorry for the late reply.

So after I read your post I did a little investigating and someone made a good point.  
It doesnt matter what mount you end up buying, your probably going to autoguide.

I really dont want crappy pictures so if autoguiding is something I'm going to do down the road anyways, I'm gonna pull the trigger and go that way.

I'm going to purchase an asi120 or 290 mini and pair it with a 50mm F4 guide scope.  Correct me if I'm wrong but that lands me at a 4:1 imaging you guiding ratio at my 750mm and even lower if I go smaller focal length in the future.

Is the explorestars PC version now ASCOM compatible?  Based on my research I'll be using PHD2 for guiding, backyard Nikon to fire my camera and I'd like like to use the explore stars app for goto for easy of locating objects.

So correct me if I'm wrong but the configuration would be camera to to PC via USB, guide camera to PC via usb then the PC to the pmc 8  is wifi and the ASCOM drivers send the info from the guidescope to the pmc8 module that way?   I've heard the st4 port is still a little unreliable.

Once again I appreciate the help. I actually got a little frustrated and almost sent it back for an EQ6R, but its twice the weight, almost twice the price and I really do like the basis of the Exos and hopefully it future proofs me for a few years until I can afford a larger mount.  

And lucky me, a friend of mind ended giving me a used Asus laptop and it should do the trick for running the programs outdoors without issue.


Re: Expected tracking times *Unguided #TECHNICAL #EXOS2

Harry
 

JB, Have you looked at the ZWO ASIair. It seems to combine many aspects that you want, and retain
wireless compatibility, all in one small box. It does support Nikon DSLR, and you mentioned using a ZWO
guide camera. I have no experience with it myself, but I am seriously considering it when I get to that point.
Excellent review on AstroBackyard.com and YouTube.

Harry

--
Harry
Vero Beach, FL
Scopes: ES AR102,  Meade ETX 90 EC (Deforked)
Mounts: ES iExos 100-PMC Eight, ExploreStars IPAD & Fire HD8,
Oberwerk 5000 Tripod, Binos: Oberwerk 15x70, 8x40


Re: Expected tracking times *Unguided #TECHNICAL #EXOS2

JB1983
 
Edited

Thanks for the information and sorry for the late reply.

So after I read your post I did a little investigating and someone made a good point.  
It doesnt matter what mount you end up buying, your probably going to autoguide.

I really dont want crappy pictures so if autoguiding is something I'm going to do down the road anyways, I'm gonna pull the trigger and go that way.

I'm going to purchase an asi120 or 290 mini and pair it with a 50mm F4 guide scope.  Correct me if I'm wrong but that lands me at a 4:1 imaging you guiding ratio at my 750mm and even lower if I go smaller focal length in the future.

Is the explorestars PC version now ASCOM compatible?  Based on my research I'll be using PHD2 for guiding, backyard Nikon to fire my camera and I'd like like to use the explore stars app for goto for easy of locating objects.

So correct me if I'm wrong but the configuration would be camera to to PC via USB, guide camera to PC via usb then the PC to the pmc 8  is wifi and the ASCOM drivers send the info from the guidescope to the pmc8 module that way?   I've heard the st4 port is still a little unreliable.

Once again I appreciate the help. I actually got a little frustrated and almost sent it back for an EQ6R, but its twice the weight, almost twice the price and I really do like the basis of the Exos and hopefully it future proofs me for a few years until I can afford a larger mount.  

And lucky me, a friend of mind ended giving me a used Asus laptop and it should do the trick for running the programs outdoors without issue.


Re: Recommended Polar Finder that will work with IEXOS-100 PMC-eight

Wes Mcdonald
 

JR

Your red dot finder and main scope need to point to the same place.  The polar scope needs to be aligned to the RA axis of the mount.  In practice you get your polar scope aligned then get the scope and red dot pointed as near as possible to the same axis as the RA.  

Since you cannot see Polaris a polar scope will do you little use.

If you move the mount to where Polaris is visible, you can use the polar scope.  In my view, sharpcap or a polemaster is superior, at least as far as the learning curve is concerned.

Wes

--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Re: Recommended Polar Finder that will work with IEXOS-100 PMC-eight

Wes Mcdonald
 

JR

As Jerry suggested Dec drift align is possible.  But before you do that you should try to use the polar alignment tool in PS Align Pro.  You can use it to get pretty close without seeing Polaris.  Then you can try doing the Dec drift align.  

Another trick that might work is to, after doing a rough polar alignment do a go-to to a star near meridian and at 0 Dec.  Then use your az-alt bolts to center the stat in your eyepiece.  This should be pretty good....but in truth I haven't been super successful doing it.

If you are planning on astrophotography then your are doing to want to use phd2 to guide.  I believe u will find it has a drift align tool.... Again I haven't used it.  I believe APT also has one, not used by me though.

Wes

--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Re: G-11 vs EXOS-2 #TECHNICAL #G11 #EXOS2

Jennifer Shelly
 

Jerry:

Thanks again.  It worked like a charm.

4       Received: ESGvES6B09T12!
3       Sending via Serial: ESGv!
2       Switching to ASCOM...
1       Mount appears to be connected on Serial
0       Com Port: COM4
--
Sincerely,
Jennifer Shelly

AstroPorch, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-8 G-11, ES PMC-8 EXOS-2, Skywatcher Star Adventurer, Skywatcher AZ-GTi
Scopes: ES N208CF, Meade APO 70 MM Astrograph
Cameras: QHY168C, ZWO ASI183MC-P, ZWO ASI183MM, Nikon D5600, Nikon D5200, Nikon D3100
Misc: SteelDrive II, SX USB Filter Wheel, TS Flip , Astromania DC Focuser
Imaging Software:  APT, BYN, SharpCap Pro, ASICap
Processing Software: PixInsight, Lightroom, Premiere Elements


Re: Recommended Polar Finder that will work with IEXOS-100 PMC-eight

Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering
 

There is another alternative for polar alignment that you may or may not be aware of but didn't want to use it. It's called the Declination drift method. This method will give you a very accurate polar alignment without being able to see Polaris. It is time consuming but works very well. We use it at our observatory. Here is a link describing this method using your camera that I reference in my first book. 

http://www.minorplanet.info/ObsGuides/Misc/ccdpolaralignment.htm

--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


Re: Recommended Polar Finder that will work with IEXOS-100 PMC-eight

jrichard333 <jrichard333@hotmail.com>
 

A couple of questions…

1.        Are there any pictures of the working prototype mounted to the iEXOS-100 mount?  I am aware during production, things can change, but I am curious J.

2.       Should not all three be in alignment i.e. the polar scope, red dot finder, and imaging device?

 

Since I am not able to see Polaris, I take a guess using LAT and Lon.  I then slew to one of my favorite planets, only two I can see J.  Jupiter or Saturn.  Depending on where the planet is in my finder scope and red dot finder, I will manually adjust the altitude and azimuth to line up to the planet and call it a day.  

 

It works for me, but I need a real polar alignment so  I can use the Goto feature to start imaging DSOs.

 

JR

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io [mailto:MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kent Marts Explore Scientific Customer Support
Sent: Wednesday, June 12, 2019 1:34 PM
To: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Recommended Polar Finder that will work with IEXOS-100 PMC-eight

 

We do have a working prototype and production should be starting on the production model. We are still months away from actually having them in hand.

I've had a couple of customers who used an inexpensive red-dot finder. They glued the foot/mounting base to the side of the axis. Thye lowered the latitude until they could see a far-away object through the polar tunnel, then aligned the red dot to that. 

When they set up the tripod, they use the red-dot finder to get Polaris into the polar tunnel.

Using an app that shows the hour angle of Polaris (PS Align Pro is what I use) to determine where in the tunnel to position Polaris will provide a very good polar alignment.

Kent Marts
Customer Service
Explore Scientific


Re: Recommended Polar Finder that will work with IEXOS-100 PMC-eight

Kent Marts- Explore Scientific Customer Service
 

We do have a working prototype and production should be starting on the production model. We are still months away from actually having them in hand.

I've had a couple of customers who used an inexpensive red-dot finder. They glued the foot/mounting base to the side of the axis. Thye lowered the latitude until they could see a far-away object through the polar tunnel, then aligned the red dot to that. 

When they set up the tripod, they use the red-dot finder to get Polaris into the polar tunnel.

Using an app that shows the hour angle of Polaris (PS Align Pro is what I use) to determine where in the tunnel to position Polaris will provide a very good polar alignment.

Kent Marts
Customer Service
Explore Scientific


Re: G-11 vs EXOS-2 #TECHNICAL #G11 #EXOS2

Jennifer Shelly
 

Thanks Jerry.  I will give it a try this evening.

--
Sincerely,
Jennifer Shelly

AstroPorch, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-8 G-11, ES PMC-8 EXOS-2, Skywatcher Star Adventurer, Skywatcher AZ-GTi
Scopes: ES N208CF, Meade APO 70 MM Astrograph
Cameras: QHY168C, ZWO ASI183MC-P, ZWO ASI183MM, Nikon D5600, Nikon D5200, Nikon D3100
Misc: SteelDrive II, SX USB Filter Wheel, TS Flip , Astromania DC Focuser
Imaging Software:  APT, BYN, SharpCap Pro, ASICap
Processing Software: PixInsight, Lightroom, Premiere Elements


Re: IEXOS-100 with prototype polar scope unguided images #iEXOS-100

Craig Bobchin
 

In my picture of the mount in the other thread, you can kind of see it. 


Re: IEXOS-100 with prototype polar scope unguided images #iEXOS-100

Wes Mcdonald
 

Craig

Looks like your polar scope worked well!  Nice pics.

Have you shown us your scope?

Wes

--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Re: Pictures of PMC-8 Mounts - Let's See Yours

brian skinner
 

Aah, got it Chris thankyou. I can also see how you support the camera lens. Excellent.
Kind regards, Brian 

On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 12:23 Chris Tardif <christardif@... wrote:

Sorry if I wasn’t clear....no.  The side-by-side didn’t work out.  It was too heavy and too hard to balance.   I just cannibalized the 14 center bar of the side-by-side assembly and screwed it to the dovetail.

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> on behalf of brian skinner <brianjimskinner@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 11, 2019 3:05:41 AM
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Pictures of PMC-8 Mounts - Let's See Yours
 
Many thanks Chris, very helpful indeed. Some photos without the camera mounted would be very useful as I can't work out in my head how the side by side saddle fits in to the overall arrangement, sorry about that; Presumably you still have the camera and finder scope mounted side by side??
Kind regards, Brian 

On Mon, 10 Jun 2019 12:38 Chris Tardif <christardif@... wrote:
A bit of back story.  This was my third attempt at a workable guide scope configuration.

 

 

It ended up being too heavy and way to hard to balance and align...I knew I was in trouble when I had to rig up an additional counter weight.


I went completely to the other end of the spectrum and tried the 30mm guide scope mounted in the hot-shoe of the camera.  That turned out to be too unstable because the hot-shoe doesn't hold it tightly enough.

 

Two guide scopes and an expensive side-by-side bar later my final set up consists of this:

 

  1. Standard Canon lens mount ring attached to:
  2. iOptron Dove Tail plate: https://www.ontariotelescope.com/Dovetail-Plate-178mm--Black_p_553.html
  3. Dove tail plate is attached to the center bar of the above side-by-side rig.  I initially thought it would be too long, but it turns out with all the cables and distances required its the right length.  Any sufficiently long bar with holes in the right place would work.  I can send you detailed pics if you need.
  4.  Several screws from Home Depot

 

It balances well, it's under the capacity and polar-alignment is good.  Centering objects is still a challenge for me, but I'm working on it.



Chris

Canon T3i modified

CLS-CCD Filter

IEXOS-100

ZWO-30mm guide scope

Altair Astro GPCAM130

SharpCap Pro, ATP, Starry Night, Photshop, PHD

Intel NUC NUC7I5BNK 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> on behalf of brian skinner <brianjimskinner@...>
Sent: Monday, June 10, 2019 4:04:08 AM
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Pictures of PMC-8 Mounts - Let's See Yours
 
Hi Chris your set up is the sort of thing I would like to move to. Could you tell me the detail of the mounting bracket used to simultaneously mount the camera and finder scope? I presume also you manage to balance the rig without any difficulty?
Kind regards, Brian 

On Sun, 9 Jun 2019 20:24 Chris Tardif <christardif@... wrote:
It is currently all torn down...I put it out on the balcony when shooting.

IEXOS100, Canon T3i and a 400mm f5.6 prime.  I use an Intel NUC PC which normally sits on the tray.  It runs everything really well.  I have APT configured to write the images to my OneDrive folders on the PC then it just syncs to my main PC where I do all my post.



Re: G-11 vs EXOS-2 #TECHNICAL #G11 #EXOS2

Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering
 
Edited

On Tue, Jun 11, 2019 at 09:27 PM, Jennifer Shelly wrote:
It appears that nothing was updated.  Am I missing something?
Hi Jennifer,

Yes, you are correct, there is something missing. What is missing was me failing to update the version string in the firmware to reflect the correct version.  I have updated the file in the download on the Explore Scientific website. I assume you went here to download the .eeprom files: The version you loaded was correct as far as the update to the motor current from 900 to 1300 mA, but the version string was wrong.

This is the new location for the knowledge base article
https://explorescientificusa.com/pages/pmc-eight-application-note-an001-how-to-update-the-pmc-eight-control-system-firmware

Here is the old knowledge base article that you probably got the firmware from. This system was scheduled to be shutdown, but apparently the comm100 company has delayed it.  I have updated the version on this page also:
https://hosted.comm100.com/KnowledgeBase/PMC-Eight-Application-Note--AN001--How-To-Update-the-PMC-Eight®-Control-System-Firmware_A5000037.aspx?id=5000037&action=preview&siteId=56501

You should be able to use the updated 9t_12_G11.eeprom file from the .zip folder containing all the firmware files and do as you did before. Hopefully you will see the updated version number come up.
Let me know if you have any questions.

Thanks for identifying this error, I apologize for any confusion.

 
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


Re: G-11 vs EXOS-2 #TECHNICAL #G11 #EXOS2

Jennifer Shelly
 

Jerry:

I am trying to update the firmware for my G-11.  I am using 9t_12_G11.eeprom
Could you please confirm that this is what I am supposed to see when I use Chris Moses' PMC-Eight Configuration Manager.

7       EVT:503-Checking COM4.
EVT:505-Propeller chip version 1 found on COM4.
EVT:506-Loading RAM
EVT:507-Verifying RAM
EVT:508-Programming EEPROM
EVT:509-Verifying EEPROM
INF:451-Success.

6       Success - results:
5       Attempting to upload ROM
4       Received: ESGvES6B09T11!
3       Sending via Serial: ESGv!
2       Switching to ASCOM...
1       Mount appears to be connected on Serial
0       Com Port: COM4

After I receive the last message "7       EVT:503-Checking COM4." I disconnect the DB-9/USB cable and power off the PMC-8.
Then I power up the PMC-8, open PMC-Eight Configuration Manager, reconnect, and enter command ESGv! and get the following.

4       Received: ESGvES6B09T11!
3       Sending via Serial: ESGv!
2       Switching to ASCOM...
1       Mount appears to be connected on Serial
0       Com Port: COM4

It appears that nothing was updated.  Am I missing something?

--
Sincerely,
Jennifer Shelly

AstroPorch, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-8 G-11, ES PMC-8 EXOS-2, Skywatcher AZ-GTi
Scopes: ES N208CF, Meade APO 70 MM Astrograph, QHY Mini Guide Scope
Cameras: QHY168C, ZWO ASI183MC-P, ZWO ASI183MM, Nikon D5600, Nikon D5200
Misc: SteelDrive II, SX USB Filter Wheel, TS Flip
Imaging Software:  APT, BYN, SharpCap Pro, ASICap
Processing Software: PixInsight, Lightroom, Premiere Elements


Re: Marty Kunz of Astronomy.FM to interview Jerry Hubbell 12 June 2019 9PM EDT #MSRO #ExploreScientific

myron_wasiuta
 

Should be a great program!
Myron


On Jun 11, 2019, at 7:25 PM, Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering <jrh@...> wrote:

Marty Kunz of Astronomy.FM will be interviewing me tomorrow night (12 June 2019 9PM EDT) on his program Space Pirate Radio.

We will be discussing the ongoing work at the Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) and the MSRO Exoplanet Follow-up Observing Program (MSRO-XOFOP) that we are starting this month. This observing program is a part of the TESS Mission Follow-up Observing Program Working Group (TFOP WG) that is currently in progress. I am currently developing the data acquisition and analysis procedures we will be following based on the standards provided by the TFOP WG. We will be incorporating observations using the recently developed Diffuser Method for high-precision photometry as discussed in our paper here: https://arxiv.org/abs/1905.02790

If you are interested in how amateur astronomers are working side by side the professionals, tune in tomorrow night.
 
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


Marty Kunz of Astronomy.FM to interview Jerry Hubbell 12 June 2019 9PM EDT #MSRO #ExploreScientific

Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering
 

Marty Kunz of Astronomy.FM will be interviewing me tomorrow night (12 June 2019 9PM EDT) on his program Space Pirate Radio.

We will be discussing the ongoing work at the Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) and the MSRO Exoplanet Follow-up Observing Program (MSRO-XOFOP) that we are starting this month. This observing program is a part of the TESS Mission Follow-up Observing Program Working Group (TFOP WG) that is currently in progress. I am currently developing the data acquisition and analysis procedures we will be following based on the standards provided by the TFOP WG. We will be incorporating observations using the recently developed Diffuser Method for high-precision photometry as discussed in our paper here: https://arxiv.org/abs/1905.02790

If you are interested in how amateur astronomers are working side by side the professionals, tune in tomorrow night.
 
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!

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