Date   

Re: Astrophotography Done with the iEXOS-100, EXOS 2, and G11 Post your Pictures and Details! Lets Show What These Mounts Can Do. #G11 #astrophotography #iEXOS-100 #EXOS2

 

Dave,
 
Thanks - Interesting workflow!  I have a couple of new tools to check out now :-)
 
- Bob
 
--
Mounts: ES PMC-8 EXOS2
Scopes: SV 102EDT, ZWO 60/280 Guide
Cameras:  Nikon D5300, Altair GPCAM2 290M
Software: ASCOM, CdC, AstroTortilla, BYN Pro, Sharpcap, PHD2
Computer:  Thinkpad x230, Win7Pro/64


Re: Upgrading my equipment #ASCOM #astrophotography #iEXOS-100 #TECHNICAL

Jeff Snell
 

Thanks Vince!  I’ll give these a look.

Jeff


On Jul 18, 2020, at 9:31 PM, Vince White <vnwhite@...> wrote:


Hey Jeff,

I have a couple of quick comments on lightening your battery pack:

If you haven't actually measured the running wattage of all of your equipment, you might be surprised by how little something consumes versus the rated wattage of the AC-DC adapter.  Something like this is convenient to measure the running wattage of individual equipment, and generally handy around the house.  You might find that your total running wattage is lower than you think and that the 114AH battery may be oversized, certainly 70# is a lot to drag around.  Depending on your laptop and OS, you should be able to enable power-savings and significantly reduce its running power consumption. 

Also, I suspect that most, if not all, of your astro gear is DC powered.  Doing a conversation from the lead-acid 12VDC to 120VAC with an inverter, then back to DC via the individual AC-DC adapters is not very efficient.  Ideally you would just use the 12VDC of your battery straight to your devices (like the PMC-Eight) or do a 12VDC to DC conversion using boost or buck converters, which are very efficient (~90%).  The downside to buck converters is that if they fail, they tend to supply the full input voltage to the end device, which can be very bad, depending on how the electronics are designed.  A boost converter doesn't have the same issue, since it would either fail or just output 12VDC.  I'm currently using 3 small buck converters and I've built added overvoltage protection circuits (called a crowbar) to each of them, however, it was a fairly complicated process to do.  Some people risk using buck converters without overvoltage protection or double them up in series to tolerate a single failure.  You also might be able to find 12V versions of your current gear, for example, here's a 12VDC powered USB 3.0 hub you could power directly off of your battery.

-Vince

--
Mount: ES PMC-8 EXOS2-GT
Scopes: BRESSER 208mm f/3.9 Newt + ES HR Coma Corrector, Celestron C90 Mak, generic 50/191mm guide scope
Cameras:  Canon EOS RP, T7C (ZWO ASI120MC clone)
Misc: 2" Optolong L-eNhance filter, 2" Optolong UHC filter, Raspberry PI 4
Software: INDI + Kstars + EKOS, DeepSkyStacker, GIMP, Lightroom, Photoshop, SIRIL


Re: Upgrading my equipment #ASCOM #astrophotography #iEXOS-100 #TECHNICAL

Vince White
 

Hey Jeff,

I have a couple of quick comments on lightening your battery pack:

If you haven't actually measured the running wattage of all of your equipment, you might be surprised by how little something consumes versus the rated wattage of the AC-DC adapter.  Something like this is convenient to measure the running wattage of individual equipment, and generally handy around the house.  You might find that your total running wattage is lower than you think and that the 114AH battery may be oversized, certainly 70# is a lot to drag around.  Depending on your laptop and OS, you should be able to enable power-savings and significantly reduce its running power consumption. 

Also, I suspect that most, if not all, of your astro gear is DC powered.  Doing a conversation from the lead-acid 12VDC to 120VAC with an inverter, then back to DC via the individual AC-DC adapters is not very efficient.  Ideally you would just use the 12VDC of your battery straight to your devices (like the PMC-Eight) or do a 12VDC to DC conversion using boost or buck converters, which are very efficient (~90%).  The downside to buck converters is that if they fail, they tend to supply the full input voltage to the end device, which can be very bad, depending on how the electronics are designed.  A boost converter doesn't have the same issue, since it would either fail or just output 12VDC.  I'm currently using 3 small buck converters and I've built added overvoltage protection circuits (called a crowbar) to each of them, however, it was a fairly complicated process to do.  Some people risk using buck converters without overvoltage protection or double them up in series to tolerate a single failure.  You also might be able to find 12V versions of your current gear, for example, here's a 12VDC powered USB 3.0 hub you could power directly off of your battery.

-Vince

--
Mount: ES PMC-8 EXOS2-GT
Scopes: BRESSER 208mm f/3.9 Newt + ES HR Coma Corrector, Celestron C90 Mak, generic 50/191mm guide scope
Cameras:  Canon EOS RP, T7C (ZWO ASI120MC clone)
Misc: 2" Optolong L-eNhance filter, 2" Optolong UHC filter, Raspberry PI 4
Software: INDI + Kstars + EKOS, DeepSkyStacker, GIMP, Lightroom, Photoshop, SIRIL


Re: EXOS 2 GT Payload Capacity

Jeff Snell
 

Thanks Mark,
I’m sure there are a myriad of factors that are affecting me.  I’m not too frustrated at this point though.  I’ve only tried it the one time.  I’ll give it a go again sometime later in the summer.  As for the comet, I got out last night in the Great Salt Lake and took some wide angle shots with an Irix 15mm f2.4 and my T5i.  Lots of clouds but I got some decent shots.

I’m camping starting this week in a dark sky area and will have my 80mm APO.  Maybe I’ll look that way😆

Have a great one!
Jeff

On Jul 18, 2020, at 11:00 AM, Mark Christensen <mjcw500@...> wrote:

Jeff,

One thing that is biting you, I am sure, is the focal length of the 8 inch SCT. That is 2000mm compared to (assuming your APO is f/7) 570mm for your APO. That means the imaging results are nearly 4 times more sensitive to the mounts capabilities, irrespective of weight, which I kind of doubt is the issue.  It also means your exposures, because the SCT is an f/10, have to be twice as long, increasing the window of time in which you are vulnerable to problems in the system, atmosphere, you name it.

So I wouldn't just blame the weight capacity of the mount. 2000mm focal length is pushing it for a mount of this class. Some people make it work but most end up frustrated.
It's why people buy things like the Losmandy G11.

Hope you've been imaging the comet with camera lenses and your APO. With a short focal length telephoto with a fast lens all you need is a tripod, even something as short as 85 or 135mm focal length can produce nice pictures of it. And the speed of that type of lens (f/1.4 to f/2.8 typically) make for short exposures.

With the 8 inch SCT all you'll get is the nucleus.

Sincerely,

Mark Christensen


Re: Upgrading my equipment #ASCOM #astrophotography #iEXOS-100 #TECHNICAL

Jeff Snell
 

Hi Koen,
What follows as far as purchases assumes you are in the US.  If not, I'm sure you can find substitutes.  

I consider my setup portable.  I break it all down and pack it in three tool boxes I bought from Home Depot/Lowes.  Here's a pic:
image.png
The Stanley holds my 80mm APO nicely.  I bought some 3" thick soft foam padding and cut it to fit the box and that keeps the APO pretty secure.

One of the two Rigids holds the EXOS 2 Mount.  I used the original shipping pack that the mount came in and just cut it to fit the box.  It slides in just like it was sent from the factory.  Once that's in, I even have enough room for the tray that came with the tool box to fit on top of it.  I put lenses, the counter weight and bar, and whatever else I think I need in there.  The other Rigid carries the remainder of gear (cameras, lenses, eyepieces, adapters, red light flashlight, misc, etc...).  The biggest part is of course the tripod.  I just pack that wherever it fits in the back of the Jeep.

Now, to the question of "portability."  This set up makes it easy to move around but of course "some assembly required" every single time.  I used a Sharpie marker on every part that has to be lined up or at a certain point (mostly all about balance of the scope)...the counter weight position on the bar, the position of the scope on the mount, even how far the camera had to go in the extension tube of the APO (that was for focus).  I'm "practiced" pretty well now so in about 15 minutes I can have it all hooked up and ready to go.  The biggest portability issue for me though was power.  If there is AC power on site at the campground, great.  But most of the places I go to camp have everything but power.  I tried to run the gear on a celestron power tank but just too much juice needed for the mount, laptop, and USB strip/accessories.  There may be a "power tank like" solution out there but I couldn't find one.  I had some great advice from folks on this forum including parts lists and instructions to build my own.  But as previously stated, I am not technically savvy and opted out of burning my house down or electrocuting myself.  I did some online searches and found this article (see page 50 from this link: https://issuu.com/amateurastophotography/docs/issue13s ).  This set me in the direction below. I ran the calculations from the article to determine what was needed then I built this:
image.png
Above:  A power pack consisting of a 114 Amp Hour Deep Cycle Marine Battery in the milk crate, and a 1500W power inverter mounted on the outside.  Bought it all at Walmart (~$300 for the battery, the inverter and the charger).  The inverter has all the outlets/USB charging I need.  I just use a single power strip to plug everything in, so I have ample outlets.  

Below:  A pic of the side of the inverter with two USB and three AC outlets.
image.png

Below: The top view of the setup on the charger since I'm taking it camping tomorrow:
image.png
Below: The inverter:
image.png

Most of the time I shoot from my backyard so all of my crap is kept assembled in a garage and I move it out when needed.  I have unobstructed southern facing sky.   I simply run a 50 foot extension cord to the gear so no battery necessary.  Easy peasy.  But, when I take this rig camping, the battery setup is the elephant in the room.  The deep cycle marine battery weighs in at around 70lbs.  I'm still in decent shape but time is catching up.  Don't know if you consider that portable or not, but I'm certainly questioning my logic on occasion :-)  I will say this though, this power pack is battle tested.  By the calculations, I should easily be able to image for about 6 hours each night for two nights in a row (maybe another if I'm lucky) without recharging.  I've tested the two night theory and it works.  I only imaged for about 4 hours each of those nights though.  Too lazy to stay up too late...

Hope this helps.  I'll let you know if it makes three nights.  My camping is a three nighter to Cedar Breaks National Monument in Utah.  10,000 feet altitude and dark sky new moon!  It'll probably rain...
 
Have a great one!  
Jeff

PMC-Eight w/Explore Stars
ES ED80mm APO
Celestron 8" Edge HD
Canon Ti-5 w/ Spencer Camera Astro-mod


On Sat, Jul 18, 2020 at 3:16 PM Koen M. <koen.molemans@...> wrote:

Hi Jeff,

The setup you have is kind of what i am looking for.
How "portable" is it?
Thing is i cant use my backyard because of blocked views so i have to go on location every time i want to do something fun


Re: Mounting camera to EXOS2 #EXOS2 #astrophotography

Chris Bourque
 

On Sat, Jul 18, 2020 at 06:47 PM, desert frag wrote:
On Sat, Jul 18, 2020 at 02:06 PM, Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering wrote:
Did you watch the video included on the page I linked to our dovetail bar for mounting your DSLR on the EXOS 2?
This shows how it works
Yes and it looks easy peasy thanks :)

For someone who might be interested in something less expensive to begin with with modest equipment would this work as well?  It says Dovetail and no mention of Losmandy type.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00Z40WWQG/?coliid=I2I5F1WVSOZRPK&colid=1B94WRIQ7BB4J&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it&th=1
Its funny, I was going to link this as well, but decided not to, as its a little "hodge podge" for using on the ES mount. Its definitely not designed for this.

However, I actually went ahead and bought this myself, in addition to the dovetail I linked above. It works "well-enough" for my testing purposes. But its not really built for the vixen style dovetail plate adapters. This is designed for a specific quick-release system. When sitting flat, this style bar does not stand as tall as a vixen style dovetail and so will not hold your equipment above the mounting plate.

That being said, it does technically "fit". Assuming you will be offsetting your camera to balance, the length of this bar allows you to secure it in the mount without the camera bumping either the mount plate, or the tightening knobs. This has been my experience when mounting a Canon 60D with 200mm telephoto lens. It works, but I wouldn't call it optimal.


Re: Mounting camera to EXOS2 #EXOS2 #astrophotography

Brad Becker
 

On Sat, Jul 18, 2020 at 11:13 AM, Chuck Lewis wrote:
Then I added a cheap red-dot finder onto the camera's flash shoe
Never heard of this.  What a nice accessory!


Re: Mounting camera to EXOS2 #EXOS2 #astrophotography

Brad Becker
 

Great thank you.


Re: Mounting camera to EXOS2 #EXOS2 #astrophotography

Brad Becker
 
Edited

On Sat, Jul 18, 2020 at 02:06 PM, Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering wrote:
Did you watch the video included on the page I linked to our dovetail bar for mounting your DSLR on the EXOS 2?
This shows how it works
Yes and it looks easy peasy thanks :)

For someone who might be interested in something less expensive to begin with with modest equipment would this work as well?  It says Dovetail and no mention of Losmandy type.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00Z40WWQG/?coliid=I2I5F1WVSOZRPK&colid=1B94WRIQ7BB4J&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it&th=1


Re: Upgrading my equipment #ASCOM #astrophotography #iEXOS-100 #TECHNICAL

Koen M.
 

Hi Jeff,

The setup you have is kind of what i am looking for.
How "portable" is it?
Thing is i cant use my backyard because of blocked views so i have to go on location every time i want to do something fun


Re: Mounting camera to EXOS2 #EXOS2 #astrophotography

Harry
 

Yes, the bottom “grooves” on the bottom of the Skywatcher adapter will fit slide right in the top of your mount. No further hardware required. I have used it with a regular ball head and a pistol grip ball head adapter. The pistol kind is very easy to adjust in any direction. You just squeeze it to adjust, and then release the pistol grip, and it stays put. However, it does add a little extra weight.

Harry
--
Harry
Vero Beach, FL
Scopes: ES  ED80CF, ES AR102,  Meade ETX 90 EC (Deforked)
Mounts: ES iExos 100-PMC Eight, ExploreStars IPAD & Fire HD8
Nikon D600, D5500, MacOS, Starry Sky Stacker, Lightroom, Affinity Photo


Re: Mounting camera to EXOS2 #EXOS2 #astrophotography

Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering
 

On Sat, Jul 18, 2020 at 02:15 PM, desert frag wrote:
Sorry, as I don't have the mount yet I don't know what's 'on top' of the mount.
The vast majority of astronomical mounts from all the manufacturers use a dovetail based mounting system. There are two styles of dovetails in general usage, Vixen style, and Losmandy style. You have to connect whatever you
want to put on the mount to either a Vixen or Losmandy dovetail. The EXOS 2 PMC-Eight uses a Vixen style dovetail.  Did you watch the video included on the page I linked to our dovetail bar for mounting your DSLR on the EXOS 2?
This shows how it works
 
--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


Re: Mounting camera to EXOS2 #EXOS2 #astrophotography

Brad Becker
 

Hi Chris, yes I was looking for something a bit cheaper but having a hard time finding one which includes 3/8" screws like the one ES sells to support the ball head I'm planning to mount.

Also, I'm trying to understand the mount nomenclature ie are all dovetails 'vixen' style or vice versa or whether it makes any difference when it comes to EOS compatibility.


Re: Astrophotography Done with the iEXOS-100, EXOS 2, and G11 Post your Pictures and Details! Lets Show What These Mounts Can Do. #G11 #astrophotography #iEXOS-100 #EXOS2

Dave Cherry
 

Thanks Robert/Jim and all.

Sorry,   I forgot about the processing details.

It was 3 Hours lights (3 min per sub)  -15 deg, gain 300
1 master Dark and for the first time I used a master flat would you believe!
Captured frames using Sharpcap with dark and flat pre-processing (Works Great!)
Sifted through all the subs taken with 'fast stone' image viewer 
deleted a few subs with meteor streaks etc.

Then I used the folder camera on SharpCap  to re-stack all the good/checked subs once again.

Exported the stack.
Used StarTools mainly for noise reduction
Took this result and fed into Star Net (stand alone version) 
Made an image with no stars
Then made adjustments and colour enhancement to the no star image in Darktable (very good free software)
Finally brought the  'no star image' into gimp and mixed this no star image  with the stars version.

Export final result

Phew..!

It sounds a lot more hassle than it actually was.
Hopefully I will be able to afford to get Pix Insight soon as my trial for that run out, and I do miss it.
This is the best I feel I could do with this  free software (With the exception of StarTools,  who don't actually ask a lot for there software and
it is well worth having in my opinion, its quirky but it does seam to do certain things no other software does)

Cheers Guys!
Clouds/rain later tonight so scope inside :(

Dave



--
Scopes: Sky Watcher 200PDS, Skywatcher 72ED
Mount: Explore Scientific PMC8 EXO2
Cameras: ASI 294MCPRO Coooled, Altair guide cam + 50mm scope
Software: Sharpcap Pro ,PH2, Stelarium Startools


Re: Mounting camera to EXOS2 #EXOS2 #astrophotography

Chris Bourque
 

On Sat, Jul 18, 2020 at 02:21 PM, desert frag wrote:
As I await delivery of my EXOS2 is there a quick & dirty method to mount my DSLR to it?  Will probably attach nothing more than a 135mm lens and try rough PA with the included polar finder.
I ended up picking up a cheap dovetail plate, just to test if camera mounting would be of interest to me. Something like this:

https://www.amazon.com/Orion-7383-8-Inch-Dovetail-Mounting/dp/B0069WCOA2/ref=pd_bxgy_img_3/137-0671962-3157535?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B0069WCOA2&pd_rd_r=3e1e2231-44c8-4dd2-9661-6123b5bdc4ee&pd_rd_w=mYU3e&pd_rd_wg=uzkNg&pf_rd_p=ce6c479b-ef53-49a6-845b-bbbf35c28dd3&pf_rd_r=0KG4N32V3ZQY4NMZ6JFT&psc=1&refRID=0KG4N32V3ZQY4NMZ6JFT

Then just buying a few 1/4" screws (#20 thread, I believe) + a few sizes of washers as spacers, to achieve the desired distance (given the length of the screw), and to create a small platform for the base of the camera to rest.

The key finding for me in practice was immediate dew buildup on the lens of my camera. I was attempting wide angle astrophotgraphy, and my typical long dewshields for my telescopes restrict the field of view for wide angle lenses (i.e. regular 35mm lenses of a DSLR). Likely I will need to invest in dew heaters for the lens to solve this. Just something to keep in mind!


Re: Mounting camera to EXOS2 #EXOS2 #astrophotography

Brad Becker
 

Harry or Jerry,

Will the SkyWatcher adapter Harry mentions connect directly to the top of the mount without any dovetail bar? 

I'm planning to get the Pergear ball head with a 3/8 thread mount connector and 1/4 camera connector.

https://www.amazon.com/TH3-Capacity-U-Shaped-Switching-Vertical/dp/B00MGJH5U6/ref=bmx_4/144-1292665-3442313?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B00MGJH5U6&pd_rd_r=181edadb-e09b-4f8a-a9ab-3efbfd83e951&pd_rd_w=BE7xM&pd_rd_wg=gaNi3&pf_rd_p=2876eb4f-6f13-4a84-8c22-9ec887c09643&pf_rd_r=JS75EBFSCHN7YM2C7Q4R&psc=1&refRID=JS75EBFSCHN7YM2C7Q4R

Sorry, as I don't have the mount yet I don't know what's 'on top' of the mount.


Re: Mounting camera to EXOS2 #EXOS2 #astrophotography

 
Edited

You'll probably get a bunch of suggestions. Here's mine:

- I made a wooden Vixen dovetail, long enough to extend back past the mount casting (toward South); then attached an inexpensive ball mount biased toward the rear
(South). The ball mount will probably need a 3/8" screw through the wooden dovetail. Of course, if you have a proper dovetail, it might already have holes. The trick is to
be able to slide the dovetail forward & backward until the mount balances. The included counterweight will be too heavy for balance about the RA axis; you might need a
really small counterweight, like a 2.5 lb, barbell weight. I found that the small barbell weights have a 1" bore, so they fit the 20mm. shaft loosely. I filled in the gap with a PVC
plumbing adapter. A Pair of 20mm. shaft collars on each side keeps it in place,...kinda.

-Then I added a cheap red-dot finder onto the camera's flash shoe. There are plenty of ways to use your ingenuity here! Your junkbox is your friend!

- Then I co-aligned the camera to the mount's RA axis. To do that, I used the polar finder and Alt/Az adjusters to get Polaris on the cross-hair marks (not the circle). The
camera was aimed at Polaris, and I checked that Polaris was in the center of the frame, by making an exposure. I adjusted the ball mount until it was perfectly centered.

- The last step is to align the red-dot finder to Polaris, too. With that done, everything was co-aligned.

- Don't forget to re-adjust the polar alignment to the real North Celestial Pole (not the cross-hairs)!!!

- You could use any convenient target rather than Polaris, but it was easy to see, and required only a small shift of the RA.

I'm a rank newbie, too; so I hope I've got that right. Seems to have worked for me...


Chuck Lewis





--
Scope: Nikon kit lenses, TBD
Mounts: Exos2GT-PMC8, homebrew barndoor tracker
Camera: Nikon D7000
S/W:  Backyard Nikon, DeepSkyStacker, Paintshop Pro 2020


Re: Mounting camera to EXOS2 #EXOS2 #astrophotography

Harry
 

Here is an option. On Amazon 15.00.

SkyWatcher S20550 Star Adventurer Ball Head Adapter, Telescope Accessory, Black

You will probably need an adapter to change the 3/8 thread to 1/4 for your camera, or simply change out the 3/8 threaded post. Very simple, but you can not adjust the camera fore/aft, like a dovetail bar.

--
Harry
Vero Beach, FL
Scopes: ES  ED80CF, ES AR102,  Meade ETX 90 EC (Deforked)
Mounts: ES iExos 100-PMC Eight, ExploreStars IPAD & Fire HD8
Nikon D600, D5500, MacOS, Starry Sky Stacker, Lightroom, Affinity Photo


Re: Mounting camera to EXOS2 #EXOS2 #astrophotography

Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering
 

On Sat, Jul 18, 2020 at 01:21 PM, desert frag wrote:
As I await delivery of my EXOS2 is there a quick & dirty method to mount my DSLR to it?
Hi,

We offer a dovetail bar designed to mount DSLR to our mounts

https://explorescientificusa.com/collections/mount-accessories/products/camera-dovetail-plate 
--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


Mounting camera to EXOS2 #EXOS2 #astrophotography

Brad Becker
 

As I await delivery of my EXOS2 is there a quick & dirty method to mount my DSLR to it?  Will probably attach nothing more than a 135mm lens and try rough PA with the included polar finder.

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