Date   

Re: introductions from Florida

Wes Mcdonald
 

The clutches hold the mount axes tight to the rotating parts driven by the motors.  In the iexos these are the silver knobs one at the back of the mount head along the ra axis and one at the top of the weight bar.  When these are tight the mount won’t move except for the motors moving them.  When you loosen them you can swing the mint around by hand.  

One you are aligned you must never release the clutches when using the pmc8.  If you do the computer  will not j ow where the mount is.

Start the pmc8 with the mount pointing at the north celestial pole.  This is polar home. Before starting make sure the clutches are tight.  The. Use explorestars to move the mount.  Never release the clutches until you are done or ready to start over from a new cold boot.

Wes 

--
Wes, Southport NC
EXos2-GT PMC-8, iExos 100
ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS+wedge, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90, 60mm no-name guide scope ~ 260mm FL
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG, ZWO 290MM, D5300 astro modified
Nina, Bootcamped Mac Mini control computer, RDP to iMAC
110 amp hour lead acid deep discharge battery for field power
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Re: introductions from Florida

Jeff Hogan
 

Thanks.    What does release the clutches mean?

On Dec 20, 2020 11:45 AM, "Wes Mcdonald via groups.io" <wesmcd6@...> wrote:
EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

Jeff

Welcome to the group.

1.  The mount needs to be aligned with true north not magnetic.  

2.  Your iPhone compass can be set to display true rather than magnetic

3.  Google magnetic declination. Or maybe magnetic deviation and look up the error at your location.  Can’t speak to it there but mine is 10 degrees in NC.

4.   Put the mount down and level it as best you can.  Point the weight bar straight down and have the weight bar on the north of the mount

5.  Adjust the altitude bolt until the telescope tube is tilted up at the same angle as your latitude. 

6.  If you have a finder scope you can adjust the mechanical azimuth and altitude to center Polaris in the finder.   Before doing this be sure the telescope and finder are looking at the same object.  You can do this in daytime by pointing the scope at a distant object on earth line a cell tower, building top etc.  center the telescope on the thing and then adjust the finder scope to center it on the same thing.  This collimates two scopes.  At night then when you center something in the finder scope it will be in the mai. Scope field of view.  Use a low power eyepiece in the telescope when doing this.  Something like a 25 or 32 mm

7.  When you get things pretty much set up mechanically it is time to turn on the pmc8 and the explorestars app.   Connect your tablet to the mount 

8.  For viewing the planets if you have the scope pointing at Polaris at turn on you are probably good to go.   Just tell explorestars to go to the planet.  It won’t hit it but it should put the planet in the finder field of view.  The. Use the left-right-up-down arrows on explorestars to center the planet in the finder and then using the low power eyepiece center it in the telescope.  Once centered press the sync button in explorestars and things should work for you.  Be sure the little triangle icon in explorestars is showing P for point mode.  You can change it from T to P by pressing it.

9.  To use the LRDU buttons you swill want to set the slew rate.  This is done by pressing one of the number buttons.  0 is very slow,9 is the fastest.  I use 3 or 4 to center.  Just touch a number which will be reflected in the center of the LRDU button cluster so you can see what rate you have

10.  Practice all this in daytime.  Don’t point to the sun.  Get used to it all before you need it Monday.  If you can get out tonight also after practicing today and getting your scope collimated with the finder you will be ahead of the game. 

11.  What scope do you have?  What mount ?  Your note is a bit confusing

12.  When you get centered up in an object you can go to higher power eyepieces, line maybe 18 or 14.  At some point the planets will look worse with high power than they do with lower power. 

When it’s over you can say you saw something that won’t happen again for 800 years.  Pretty cool. 

13.  If all else fails just plop the mint down approximately north.  Turn it on and tell explorestars to goto Jupiter.   release the clutches and swing the thing around until you. Center the planets.  Then lock the clutches and press the T button and the sync button. Then use the LRDU buttons to keep the planets about centered.  It’s that easy really.  The planets are away to see with the naked eye and thus easy to get into the scope field of view without a lot of accuracy.

Wes



--
Wes, Southport NC
EXos2-GT PMC-8, iExos 100
ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS+wedge, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90, 60mm no-name guide scope ~ 260mm FL
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG, ZWO 290MM, D5300 astro modified
Nina, Bootcamped Mac Mini control computer, RDP to iMAC
110 amp hour lead acid deep discharge battery for field power
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Re: introductions from Florida

Wes Mcdonald
 

👍👍👍🤞
--
Wes, Southport NC
EXos2-GT PMC-8, iExos 100
ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS+wedge, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90, 60mm no-name guide scope ~ 260mm FL
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG, ZWO 290MM, D5300 astro modified
Nina, Bootcamped Mac Mini control computer, RDP to iMAC
110 amp hour lead acid deep discharge battery for field power
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Re: Control the mount with a Joystick or Cellphone #iEXOS-100 #app

Luiz Sanches
 

Thank you Jerry, thats what I was looking for. I searshed for a tutorial in the forum and could use the Joystick. But, only works with the POTH? I prefer Device Hub. With it, the NESW dont worked, only with POTH. I configured the Preset Slew Rate in setup. Maybe I need a diferente preset expecific for Device Hub, or, simply dont work?

Yorksman and Wes, thank you. 


Re: introductions from Florida

Leigh Caldwell
 

Hi Jeff

Wes is absolutely the expert and you should do everything he says.

But from one beginner to another, my experience was: It took me a few nights to get the hang of even simple things like using ExploreStars and finding the right focus point for a new eyepiece (though I was pretty much new to telescopes as well as this mount - you may have more experience than I did). So if you don't get it worked out tonight, and given that you only have a couple of hours to see this tomorrow, consider going straight to Wes's point 13. In fact you can keep it even simpler like this:

Unlock the clutches (making sure to support the weight of the telescope), swing it round and point towards the two planets. You'll easily be able to point to them, and will probably be able to aim the finderscope with one hand (and eye!) while locking the clutches with the other. If the planets are in the center of the finderscope they will most likely be visible in your biggest eyepiece. Adjust until they're in the center and then switch in a shorter eyepiece if you want to. Jupiter is so bright that you'll easily be able to refocus even without tracking to keep them centered.

You can do all this no matter what way the mount is pointing, and potentially even without powering it up. Having said that, if you don't get it to track, you'll need to keep adjusting by hand, but that's much better than missing the whole thing while fiddling with technology.

I saw them tonight - at about twice the separation they'll have tomorrow, I think - and they looked stunning in my 28mm eyepiece (1000mm focal length telescope - Skywatcher 200PDS). I did have my tracking working so I took some video footage which I'll try stacking tomorrow, but even if that doesn't come out well, I still feel I've seen an almost once in a lifetime sight.

Good luck tomorrow and hope your kid enjoys it! When they're 31 they'll be able to look up at the conjunction again, and remember this experience.


Re: introductions from Florida

Jeff Hogan
 

Thanks Wes.  I’ll respond below each item as it pertains.

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> On Behalf Of Wes Mcdonald via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, December 20, 2020 11:41 AM
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] introductions from Florida

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 

Jeff

 

Welcome to the group.

 

  1. The mount needs to be aligned with true north not magnetic.  

 

OK.  I had clearly gotten this wrong.

 

  1. Your iPhone compass can be set to display true rather than magnetic

I don’t have an iphone; but, have been using a Samsung Galaxy tablet…and it just seems unreliable.  My android cell phone does not have a true compass as it’s an inexpensive one that I got for about $40

 

 

  1. Google magnetic declination. Or maybe magnetic deviation and look up the error at your location.  Can’t speak to it there but mine is 10 degrees in NC.

Thanks.  I will.

 

 

  1. Put the mount down and level it as best you can.  Point the weight bar straight down and have the weight bar on the north of the mount

This is definitely user error.  My weight bar was at the south of the mount.

 

 

  1. Adjust the altitude bolt until the telescope tube is tilted up at the same angle as your latitude. 

 

This I managed.

 

  1. If you have a finder scope you can adjust the mechanical azimuth and altitude to center Polaris in the finder.   Before doing this be sure the telescope and finder are looking at the same object.  You can do this in daytime by pointing the scope at a distant object on earth line a cell tower, building top etc.  center the telescope on the thing and then adjust the finder scope to center it on the same thing.  This collimates two scopes.  At night then when you center something in the finder scope it will be in the mai. Scope field of view.  Use a low power eyepiece in the telescope when doing this.  Something like a 25 or 32 mm

 

Thanks. Have not tried this.

 

 

7.  When you get things pretty much set up mechanically it is time to turn on the pmc8 and the explorestars app.   Connect your tablet to the mount 

 

8.  For viewing the planets if you have the scope pointing at Polaris at turn on you are probably good to go.   Just tell explorestars to go to the planet.  It won’t hit it but it should put the planet in the finder field of view.  The. Use the left-right-up-down arrows on explorestars to center the planet in the finder and then using the low power eyepiece center it in the telescope.  Once centered press the sync button in explorestars and things should work for you.  Be sure the little triangle icon in explorestars is showing P for point mode.  You can change it from T to P by pressing it.

 

9.  To use the LRDU buttons you swill want to set the slew rate.  This is done by pressing one of the number buttons.  0 is very slow,9 is the fastest.  I use 3 or 4 to center.  Just touch a number which will be reflected in the center of the LRDU button cluster so you can see what rate you have

 

10.  Practice all this in daytime.  Don’t point to the sun.  Get used to it all before you need it Monday.  If you can get out tonight also after practicing today and getting your scope collimated with the finder you will be ahead of the game. 

 

11.  What scope do you have?  What mount ?  Your note is a bit confusing

 

 

All user ignorance here.  I don’t think I even realized I had 3 different systems.  I have the PMC-8 and the iexos-100 equatorial mount.  Along with that the Explore FirstLight 80mm Go-To-Tracker from Explore Stars.



 

12.  When you get centered up in an object you can go to higher power eyepieces, line maybe 18 or 14.  At some point the planets will look worse with high power than they do with lower power. 

 

When it’s over you can say you saw something that won’t happen again for 800 years.  Pretty cool. 

 

13.  If all else fails just plop the mint down approximately north.  Turn it on and tell explorestars to goto Jupiter.   release the clutches and swing the thing around until you. Center the planets.  Then lock the clutches and press the T button and the sync button. Then use the LRDU buttons to keep the planets about centered.  It’s that easy really.  The planets are away to see with the naked eye and thus easy to get into the scope field of view without a lot of accuracy.

 

Wes

 

 

Thanks Wes.  I’m hoping we are successful.  My 11 year old is very excited.

 


--
Wes, Southport NC
EXos2-GT PMC-8, iExos 100
ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS+wedge, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90, 60mm no-name guide scope ~ 260mm FL
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG, ZWO 290MM, D5300 astro modified
Nina, Bootcamped Mac Mini control computer, RDP to iMAC
110 amp hour lead acid deep discharge battery for field power
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Re: introductions from Florida

Wes Mcdonald
 

Jeff

Welcome to the group.

1.  The mount needs to be aligned with true north not magnetic.  

2.  Your iPhone compass can be set to display true rather than magnetic

3.  Google magnetic declination. Or maybe magnetic deviation and look up the error at your location.  Can’t speak to it there but mine is 10 degrees in NC.

4.   Put the mount down and level it as best you can.  Point the weight bar straight down and have the weight bar on the north of the mount

5.  Adjust the altitude bolt until the telescope tube is tilted up at the same angle as your latitude. 

6.  If you have a finder scope you can adjust the mechanical azimuth and altitude to center Polaris in the finder.   Before doing this be sure the telescope and finder are looking at the same object.  You can do this in daytime by pointing the scope at a distant object on earth line a cell tower, building top etc.  center the telescope on the thing and then adjust the finder scope to center it on the same thing.  This collimates two scopes.  At night then when you center something in the finder scope it will be in the mai. Scope field of view.  Use a low power eyepiece in the telescope when doing this.  Something like a 25 or 32 mm

7.  When you get things pretty much set up mechanically it is time to turn on the pmc8 and the explorestars app.   Connect your tablet to the mount 

8.  For viewing the planets if you have the scope pointing at Polaris at turn on you are probably good to go.   Just tell explorestars to go to the planet.  It won’t hit it but it should put the planet in the finder field of view.  The. Use the left-right-up-down arrows on explorestars to center the planet in the finder and then using the low power eyepiece center it in the telescope.  Once centered press the sync button in explorestars and things should work for you.  Be sure the little triangle icon in explorestars is showing P for point mode.  You can change it from T to P by pressing it.

9.  To use the LRDU buttons you swill want to set the slew rate.  This is done by pressing one of the number buttons.  0 is very slow,9 is the fastest.  I use 3 or 4 to center.  Just touch a number which will be reflected in the center of the LRDU button cluster so you can see what rate you have

10.  Practice all this in daytime.  Don’t point to the sun.  Get used to it all before you need it Monday.  If you can get out tonight also after practicing today and getting your scope collimated with the finder you will be ahead of the game. 

11.  What scope do you have?  What mount ?  Your note is a bit confusing

12.  When you get centered up in an object you can go to higher power eyepieces, line maybe 18 or 14.  At some point the planets will look worse with high power than they do with lower power. 

When it’s over you can say you saw something that won’t happen again for 800 years.  Pretty cool. 

13.  If all else fails just plop the mint down approximately north.  Turn it on and tell explorestars to goto Jupiter.   release the clutches and swing the thing around until you. Center the planets.  Then lock the clutches and press the T button and the sync button. Then use the LRDU buttons to keep the planets about centered.  It’s that easy really.  The planets are away to see with the naked eye and thus easy to get into the scope field of view without a lot of accuracy.

Wes



--
Wes, Southport NC
EXos2-GT PMC-8, iExos 100
ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS+wedge, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90, 60mm no-name guide scope ~ 260mm FL
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG, ZWO 290MM, D5300 astro modified
Nina, Bootcamped Mac Mini control computer, RDP to iMAC
110 amp hour lead acid deep discharge battery for field power
Electrical Engineer, Retired


introductions from Florida

Jeff Hogan
 

Hi,

 

My name is Jeff and I am writing from a city in Florida named Apopka.  We bought the Explore Scientific Telescope (iexs-100) along with the PMC-Eight mount.

I have been trying for about four days to align it to Polaris without luck and I place 90% of the blame on me.  This is a pretty heavy system and it’s not one we can leave outside so I’m not quite understanding why this appears to be so complicated to setup to use.

98% of my issue is with getting it aligned to Polaris.   The other 90% of my issue is not even knowing accurately where Magnetic North is where I’m located.   I’ve downloaded about every app I can find and using my old army compass.  The digital apps (on the tablet and phone) north seems to move based on where I happen to stand. 

I also understand the handheld compass is going to find true north and not magnetic north which the mount appears to need. 

I’m just hoping to have someone educate me on how to accurately align my telescope (even on a cloudy night) to function.  We really want to see Jupiter and Saturn tomorrow night.

 

 

 

 


Re: Control the mount with a Joystick or Cellphone #iEXOS-100 #app

Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering
 

If you want to use a gamepad with the ASCOM driver, use ASCOMPAD. People get confused because this is an EQMOD project but ASCOMPAD works with any ASCOM mount. If you search this forum for ASCOMPAD you should find several messages about it and other members that use ASCOMPAD with their gamepad controller will chime in also.
--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


iExos 100 Wired connection issues #ASCOM #iEXOS-100 #pmc-eight #TECHNICAL

nishthakaushal@...
 

Dear reader, 

I apologize in advance for the big explanation however, I am just trying to provide every detail so someone is able to help. 

Ever since I got the iExos 100 I have not been able to use it to its full potential. At first I experienced alignment issues, then I had to deal with Explore Stars software for windows crashing every couple minutes. 

I thought the only way to fix this issue would be by having a serial wired connection. I got a mini usb to serial cable and plugged it into my laptop. I followed ESAN002_rev02.pdf (netsolhost.com) guide to switch the network from wifi to serial, however Putty would not find the IP address even though I was wirelessly connected to the mount. Then I thought that the issue might have occured because the mount does not have the most updated firmware, so I went on PMC8 Configuration manager. The mount showed as connected however, it also requires a serial connection to update, so I went under advanced clicked on serial.

This is when things got even trickier. Clearly, the mount had received the command, since I heard the motor sound change however, the configuration manager could not detect the mount. I went under connection made sure it was set to iExos100 and clicked "find". However, the mount was not found. I went back into advanced and tried switching back to wireless (udp) to no avail. Then I thought maybe it would now show up on putty, so I tried connecting with TELNET and putty was unable to communicate with the mount. BTW, the mount is wireless connected via wifi and connected via serial cable aswell throuout all fo this. Finally, I decide to check under ascom diagnostic tools and what I see there is an option to switch to serial connection. I click that. Try to connect via Ascom and nothing hapens. So, i go back to Ascom and switch it back to wireless. Again I try to connect and while I was not able to connect, the diagnostic tool did show this info:
           <Default>                 ES_PMC8 Telescope
                    COM Port                  <Empty>
                    COM Speed                 115200
                    DEC Park Position         0
                    DEC Sidereal Rate Fraction 0.4
                    IP Address                192.168.47.1
                    IP Port                   54372
                    Minimum Pulse Time        100
                    Mount Rate                Sidereal
                    Mount Type                Explore Scientific iEXOS-100
                    RA Park Position          0
                    RA Sidereal Rate Fraction 0.4
                    Rate Offset arc-sec/sec   0
                    RefractionApplied         False
                    Site Ambient Temperature  59
                    Site Elevation meters     403
                    Site Latitude            erased
                    Site Location             Explore Scientific HQ
                    Site Longitude           erased

                    Telescope Aperture Area   0.00292
                    Telescope Aperture Diameter 0.061
                    Telescope Focal Length    0.36
                    Total DEC Counts          4147200
                    Total RA Counts           4147200
                    Trace Level               False
                    WIFI Module ID            ESP-WROOM-02
                    Wireless Enabled          True
                    Wireless Protocol         TCP
I manually erased the location for obvious reasons. Anyway, since it showed that the wireless protocol is TCP, I went back into configuration manager and switched to TCP instead of UDP for wireless connection. I tried to connect, find etc.. No results. I have tried restarting my PC, the mount, I did install the Parallax Serial Interface (but it does not show the port).My PC does detect the cable but does not recognize it. The mount is still showing up in the wifi section and I can still connect but I cant actually use the mount. 

After all this frustration I have decided to make my first post on this platform. Hopefully one of the engineers from the company can help. I really don't want this mount to become a $700 piece of metal. 

I am even willing to give remote access to my laptop to a verified engineer/technician from the company if all else fails. 


Re: Astrophotography Done with the iEXOS-100, EXOS 2, and G11 Post your Pictures and Details! Lets Show What These Mounts Can Do. #G11 #astrophotography #iEXOS-100 #EXOS2

Wes Mcdonald
 

Darrell:

There you go, nice.  Now get you a horse head and flame nebula.  

Wes.


--
Wes, Southport NC
EXos2-GT PMC-8, iExos 100
ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS+wedge, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90, 60mm no-name guide scope ~ 260mm FL
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG, ZWO 290MM, D5300 astro modified
Nina, Bootcamped Mac Mini control computer, RDP to iMAC
110 amp hour lead acid deep discharge battery for field power
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Re: Control the mount with a Joystick or Cellphone #iEXOS-100 #app

Wes Mcdonald
 

Yorksman

If you use a PC you can use SkySafari on your phone.

But there is another option.  ASCOMPAD is an application that allows you to use a hand controller.  You can search the forum for messages about it.  It works pretty well.  I got it going but don't use it in favor of skysafari on the phone.  Many others have, complete with bluetooth version of the controller I believe.  Perhaps they can chime in to help you get setup.

Wes.


--
Wes, Southport NC
EXos2-GT PMC-8, iExos 100
ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS+wedge, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90, 60mm no-name guide scope ~ 260mm FL
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG, ZWO 290MM, D5300 astro modified
Nina, Bootcamped Mac Mini control computer, RDP to iMAC
110 amp hour lead acid deep discharge battery for field power
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Re: Control the mount with a Joystick or Cellphone #iEXOS-100 #app

Wes Mcdonald
 

Luiz

Eqmod won’t work.

If you are running ascom on a pc you can control the mount with your cell phone using sky safari pro.  If you search the forum for my posts on sky safari you can find how.  Also I gave a video presentation on the open goto web cast on week 10-20 or somewhere around there.

You load WiFiScope which is an app you can google, onto your PC.  Load SkySafari Pro on your phone.  The instructions for WiFiScope tell you how to connect everything.  What happens is the phone connected to your home wifi.  The PC connects to your home wifi.  The PC is connected to the PMC8 via serial/ascom.  Skysafari is set up to send data to wifiscope over the home internet.  Wifiscope catches commands sent from Skysafari and forwards them to the ascom hub.  The trick is to set SkySafari to the Meade Classic as a scope.  It sends Meade commands to wifiscope which translates them into Ascom calls to poth.

This all works great.  Skysafari can then be used as a hand controller.  It has Up, down, left, right buttons.  It also has a planetarium and goto buttons.  it has a scope position display, and it can overlay your camera field of view.

It's great.

Now if you are in the field you need to have a wifi network router to make this work.  I use an old wifi router I had laying around.  It puts up a little network to which all my stuff joins.  Whole thing runs on battery.  No sweat.

Wes.






--
Wes, Southport NC
EXos2-GT PMC-8, iExos 100
ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS+wedge, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90, 60mm no-name guide scope ~ 260mm FL
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG, ZWO 290MM, D5300 astro modified
Nina, Bootcamped Mac Mini control computer, RDP to iMAC
110 amp hour lead acid deep discharge battery for field power
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Re: Control the mount with a Joystick or Cellphone #iEXOS-100 #app

Yorksman
 

It is possible to connect to the iexos-100 with serial cable and ascom and use the ascom device hub and then configure cartes du ciel to work with the ascom device hub. I am told that if ascom is on a laptop, most games controllers and some joysticks can be used rather than using the device hub control in ascom. I am expecting delivery of one and will be happy to report if it works. It does seem to be more comfortable if you can look through the scope whilst holding a controlling device and with keys, one doesn't have to take one's eyes away from the finderscope for fine adjustment.

Otherise, I have used explorstars and a 10" tablet but, whilst initially thinking this was awkward, I started to use a high pedestal table immediately next to the mount on which I could place the tablet. It has to be high enough for you not to have stoop to see it and close enough for you not to have to walk away from the mount. I think a games controller will be better, but if not, a high pedestal table is very comfortable.


Control the mount with a Joystick or Cellphone #iEXOS-100 #app

Luiz Sanches
 

Hello
I want to control the mount iExus 100 with a controler, that can be a Joystick or Cellphone.
I dont want to use the Explore Stars on Cellphone, because I want to Slew to a target with other aplication using TCP or Serial on computer, and after that make a fine ajustments with the joystick or the cellphone. With the computer, I can make the fine ajustments, but I want to make this ajustments with a cellphone or Joystick when I am looking on the finder. Do you know other aplication on Cellphone? 

I saw that I can use joystick with Kstars, but I am not using Indi drivers (windows is working better). Or I can use EQMod, but I dont know how to connect the mount in the EQMod. I caught Tutorial learning how to connect, but the Ascom driver of the mount don't appear. Look the images of the configuration of EQMod:


Thank you for the help!


Re: Astrophotography Done with the iEXOS-100, EXOS 2, and G11 Post your Pictures and Details! Lets Show What These Mounts Can Do. #G11 #astrophotography #iEXOS-100 #EXOS2

Derrell Oliver
 

Hey Guys,
Here is my attempt at M42 & M43 with the running man nebula, using my
AT80ED, iEXOS-100 PMC-Eight & Canon XSi 450D.
26 x 120 sec @ iso800 with Astromania Moon & Skyglow filter.
15 x 180 sec @ iso800 with Svbony UHC filter.
Total of 97 minutes of exposure time, now I need to work on taming the core.
Not as good as Vince’s but I’m making progress !
Cheers !
--
Derrell Oliver

ES iEXOS-100 PMC-Eight with ES Heavy Duty ST3 tripod & Azimuth Adjuster
ES USB Power Bank
Astro-Tech AT80ED.
Astro-Tech 0.80 Field Flattener/Reducer.
Meade Infinity ST80 with Lunt Solar dual speed crayford focuser.
Meade Polaris 90 with GSO dual speed crayford focuser.
Meade Polaris 130 with ScopeStuff 1.25 crayford focuser.
ZWO ASI120mc-s, Canon XSi 450d.
ZWO ASI120mm-mini & ZWO 30mm f/4 Mini Guide Scope
EQ2 Mount with Orion EQ-2M RA Drive.
AZ3 Alt-Azimuth Mount.


Re: Is FT_PROG inversion needed for Stellarmate #iEXOS-100

bill rowe
 

ok good - thanks for answering.


Re: Is FT_PROG inversion needed for Stellarmate #iEXOS-100

Alex Z.
 

I also have an iEXOS-100. Per Jerry's past answer, I Inverted mine. Worked great. I use Astroberry (similar to Stellarmate).

Alex Z.




From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> on behalf of bill rowe <bill_rowe_ottawa@...>
Sent: Thursday, December 17, 2020 9:42 PM
To: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io>
Subject: [ESPMC-Eight] Is FT_PROG inversion needed for Stellarmate #iEXOS-100
 
My mount has a mini-usb connector.

Thanks


Is FT_PROG inversion needed for Stellarmate #iEXOS-100

bill rowe
 

My mount has a mini-usb connector.

Thanks


Re: iExos 100 disconecting from wifi #iEXOS-100

Wes Mcdonald
 

Luiz

Yes.  The pmc8 uses 12v power.  I have a power box I built with the battery, wiring, metering, charging port etc.   especially important to use fuses.  Permanent wiring also prevents reverse voltages etc. it’s well worth the time to build one of these things.





--
Wes, Southport NC
EXos2-GT PMC-8, iExos 100
ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS+wedge, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90, 60mm no-name guide scope ~ 260mm FL
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG, ZWO 290MM, D5300 astro modified
Nina, Bootcamped Mac Mini control computer, RDP to iMAC
110 amp hour lead acid deep discharge battery for field power
Electrical Engineer, Retired

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