Date   

Re: Astrophotography Done with the iEXOS-100, EXOS 2, and G11 Post your Pictures and Details! Lets Show What These Mounts Can Do. #G11 #astrophotography #iEXOS-100 #EXOS2

Walter Vinci
 

Hi Paul,

That’s very nice! How often did you dither? I read you have to dither quite a bit to take advantage if drizzle. I am curious to see the difference with regular stacking too. 

Best,
Walter

On Mar 13, 2021, at 9:33 AM, Paul Meesters <p.h.meesters@...> wrote:


<M81-1.png>

My take on Bode's and the Cigar galaxies.
137 two minute exposures with the ED 102 on the EXOS-II. Captured with the ZWO ASI071MC Pro (OSC camera) and the AsiairPro controlling.
Stacked in SIRIL (with drizzle, took over 6 hours), postprocessing in Photoshop

--
Greetz,
Paul

Equipment: ES Exos-II PMC-Eight; Sky-Watcher Star Adventurer Pro; ED APO 102mm f/7 FCD-100 CF; William Optics Redcat 51; Bresser Messier 8x50 finderscope; Astro Essentials 32mm F/4 mini guide scope; ZWO ASI 120mm mini guidecamera
Software: PixInsight, Deep Sky Stacker; Siril; PHD2; SharpCap; Photoshop CC; Pipp; Registax 6; Autostakkert 3; ExploreStars; APT

--
———

Walter Vinci

ES EXOS2-GT PMC-Eight
ES ED80
Starfield 0.8 Field Flattener/Reducer.
ZWO ASI290mm-mini & Orion 50mm Guide Scope
Canon EOS Rebel SL1
SharpCap, APT, PHD2, SiriL, Stellarium


Astrophotography Done with the iEXOS-100, EXOS 2, and G11 Post your Pictures and Details! Lets Show What These Mounts Can Do. #G11 #astrophotography #iEXOS-100 #EXOS2

Paul Meesters
 


My take on Bode's and the Cigar galaxies.
137 two minute exposures with the ED 102 on the EXOS-II. Captured with the ZWO ASI071MC Pro (OSC camera) and the AsiairPro controlling.
Stacked in SIRIL (with drizzle, took over 6 hours), postprocessing in Photoshop

--
Greetz,
Paul

Equipment: ES Exos-II PMC-Eight; Sky-Watcher Star Adventurer Pro; ED APO 102mm f/7 FCD-100 CF; William Optics Redcat 51; Bresser Messier 8x50 finderscope; Astro Essentials 32mm F/4 mini guide scope; ZWO ASI 120mm mini guidecamera
Software: PixInsight, Deep Sky Stacker; Siril; PHD2; SharpCap; Photoshop CC; Pipp; Registax 6; Autostakkert 3; ExploreStars; APT


locked Re: Guiding questions

Mirko Gude
 

Hi Jaimie,

thanks a lot for your description and remarks. Indeed, the focus of the guiding scope could be better. I will take care about this next time. Sometimes I adjust the guiding scope during daylight, maybe I moved it out of focus and than I forget to focus again during the night. Balance could sometimes also a little bit better. Very often I change something and than I forget to rebalance the scope again.

Best,
Mirko

Am 13.03.2021 um 04:49 schrieb Jaimie Murdock <jaimie.murdock@...>:

Hi Mirko,

I'm also fairly new to astrophotography, but I am also using the same software setup as you with the ES PMC-8 iEXOS-100 and included a screenshot below. Your RMS numbers are very high.

The first thing I noticed with your screenshot is the focus on your guidecam - it is very out-of-focus. While the guidecam is more tolerant to being out-of-focus, a 2-second exposure should show pin-point stars.

I guide with Via set to "ES iEXOS-100 PMC-Eight". This uses the USB cable for pulse guiding. I have not tried to use the ST-4 cable at all. It is not a part of my setup.  

The five biggest factors for successful guiding, so far:
1. Balance - ensuring that the scope is balanced in both RA and Dec, using the instructions in the manual.
2. Guidecam Focus - Having pinpoint stars reduces variance between exposures, increases accuracy.
3. Box Size - 16 has worked really well for me
4. Star selection - A star that is bright and stretches to the box size is ideal.
5. Remove Guidescope Flexure - make sure the guidecam is mounted securely to the primary scope. Mine was a little loose, causing maddening issues when the slightest bit of wind hit the scope and wobbled the actual camera.

I hope this helps!

Best, 
Jaimie


<image.png>

On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 11:54 AM Mirko Gude <mgude@...> wrote:
Hi,

because I've made some progress in setting up my equipment, I'am now able to spend some time for guiding. At the beginning there was no time for this, there were so many other questions so solve :-)

In the past months I've made some attempts to use guiding to achieve longer exposures. I'am using Indi/EKOS with a Raspberry Pi and EKOS provides a guiding function. First, I had the idea, that guiding will compensate a rough polar alignment, but after some attempts, I think that a good polar alignment is also important for guiding :-)

Very often I get a message like this:
"Guide DEC: Scope count not reach the start point after 21 iterations
Possible mount or backlash problems"

How could I check, If I have a issue with the mount (iEXOS 100 in this case)?

There are also two options to use the guiding camera. EKOS offers "via Camera" or "via ES iXEOS 100" in a menu. I've chosen via ES iEXOS 100, because i was to lazy to search the cable. My second question is, If it makes an important difference If I use this way or If it is better to connect the guiding camera directly with the mount (from Autoguider (ST4) Port camera to Autoguider (ST4) Port mount) ?

Third question is about the guiding rate. EKOS has an option for this and the default ist 0,5. Should I change this? (s. screenshot, it shows also the setting for guiding via, but this is in german). I found in the PMC_Eight_ProgrammersReferenceManual that the sidereal rate is 48. So maybe I should adjust the value to 0.48?

I will also attach a second screenshot, in this case guiding was working for some time. Maybe somebody has a hint what I could improve? 

Thanks and best Regards,
Mirko
<Guiding.png><guiding2.png>
--

Mounts: ES PMC-8 IEXOS 100, ES EXOS2-GT 
Scopes: Skywatcher 80/600, TS Photoline 72/432mm-Apo
Cameras:  Nikon Z6, D7000, ZWO ASI385 Color, QHY 5L-II-mono
Lens: Sigma 150-600mm, Sigma Art 135mm/1,8, Nikon Z 50mm/1,8, Tamron 70-200mm
Msc: LRTimelapse Pro Timer 2.5, Raspberry Pi4, Polemaster, GPS Dongle, QHY miniGuideScope
Software: PixInsight, Kstars, Starry Night, Redshift



--
Mount: ES PMC-8 iEXOS-100
Scope: William Optics ZenithStar 61II w/ UniGuide 32mm
Cameras: Canon EOS 1100D (Rebel T3), QHY-5-III-462C
Software: KStars on Astroberry, DeepSkyStacker and Photoshop


--

Mounts: ES PMC-8 IEXOS 100, ES EXOS2-GT 
Scopes: Skywatcher 80/600, TS Photoline 72/432mm-Apo
Cameras:  Nikon Z6, D7000, ZWO ASI385 Color, QHY 5L-II-mono
Lens: Sigma 150-600mm, Sigma Art 135mm/1,8, Nikon Z 50mm/1,8, Tamron 70-200mm
Msc: LRTimelapse Pro Timer 2.5, Raspberry Pi4, Polemaster, GPS Dongle, QHY miniGuideScope
Software: PixInsight, Kstars, Starry Night, Redshift


Re: Android and Amazon Fire ExploreStars has been updated #ExploreStars #ExploreScientific

Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering
 

On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 10:19 AM, brian skinner wrote:
If necessary I would happily go back to using both previous versions of the app and data base if this was possible?
Hi Brian,

I think I stated previously (perhaps not) that there is no need to update the database when downloading the updated Android application and installing it on your tablet. The database has not changed, Only the application. There is no need to get wrapped around the axle trying to download the database again. 
 
--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


Re: Android and Amazon Fire ExploreStars has been updated #ExploreStars #ExploreScientific

Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering
 

On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 10:26 AM, Aaron Thompson wrote:

Hello Brian,  I am jumping in a little late in this conversation.  

Here is a download link for the Android Explore Stars page.  

https://explorescientificusa.com/pages/android-os-download

Here is a direct link to the Explore Stars Database files for the Android version of the app and contains the SQL database file needed for this version of the app. 

http://02d3287.netsolhost.com/pmc-eight/ES_Android_DB_Images.zip

Make sure an place the contents of the zip file on the SD card of your tablet.  

 

The Windows version uses a different database package and can be found here. 

https://explorescientificusa.com/pages/microsoft-windows-10-explorestars-app-download

 

Does this help you get the app back into working order?

The easiest way to download and install the database for your Android tablet is to use the Configuration Manager. Manually downloading and copying the files, although very easy to do, can be challenging to some folks.
 
--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


Re: Android and Amazon Fire ExploreStars has been updated #ExploreStars #ExploreScientific

Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering
 

On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 08:26 PM, Patrick Maher wrote:
Deciding that there is no pressing need for updating the Windows version of ExploreStars is very disappointing to me.  I have no use for Android and I definitely have no use for iPad.  I already use Windows for the serial connection and astrophotography so I have been hoping for continued upgrades and support for the Windows platform for ExploreStars.  Maybe I am in the minority but since I use ASCOM with Windows, I use Windows for ExploreStars too.  

This comes as quite a surprise to me and gives me something to seriously think about for the direction to go in the future.

Hi Patrick,

I think you have mischaracterized the reasoning behind us not updating the Windows version of the ExploreStars application. We understand there may be a pressing need for some customers to have ExploreStars on Windows if they believe that there is no other "better" software available to control the mount, but our customers that think that have to also understand that we are a small company and we have to manage our resources to help out the most customer's. We are very gratified that the ExploreStars application has such a great following. The issue we face is that we have been very effective in developing the PMC-Eight system into a highly flexible system that affords our customers a large number of ways to use the PMC-Eight system. This results in us needing to provide tools for a very diverse set of customers and taxes our resources even more.

We are continuing to move further in that direction today which makes it even more difficult. As you know, our PMC-Eight system is available on on a mid to high range system (depending on your point of view) the G11, and also on the most inexpensive, full featured mount system, the iEXOS 100. There are challenges everywhere when doing this as we have customers who have never used an astronomical mount before to those who have several decades using these types of systems. As I said, we have to manage and prioritize our work to benefit the most customers and unfortunately the Windows ExploreStars application has not been the priority. Those are the facts. Rest assured that we still discuss the need to upgrade the Windows version of ExploreStars, but we are also moving forward to to try and improve the system so that we can make ExploreStars and it's predecessors available on all platforms, not just desktops, and tablets, but on other mobile devices such as the iPhone.

The bottom line is that is is more of a matter of priorities given the resource restrictions we are dealing with, it's not because we don't think it is important, we just think that there are more important tasks which we have to work on which help more of our customers. 

Thanks
 
--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


Astrophotography Done with the iEXOS-100, EXOS 2, and G11 Post your Pictures and Details! Lets Show What These Mounts Can Do. #G11 #astrophotography #iEXOS-100 #EXOS2

Paul Meesters
 



My take on the California Nebula.
50 minutes of 2 minute exposures with the ED 102 on the EXOS-II. Captured with the ZWO ASI071MC Pro (OSC camera) and the AsiairPro controlling the flow.
Stacked in PixInsight, entirely postprocessed in Photoshop.

Honest opinions please, and tips & tricks on improving this image.
--
Greetz,
Paul

Equipment: ES Exos-II PMC-Eight; Sky-Watcher Star Adventurer Pro; ED APO 102mm f/7 FCD-100 CF; William Optics Redcat 51; Bresser Messier 8x50 finderscope; Astro Essentials 32mm F/4 mini guide scope; ZWO ASI 120mm mini guidecamera
Software: PixInsight, Deep Sky Stacker; Siril; PHD2; SharpCap; Photoshop CC; Pipp; Registax 6; Autostakkert 3; ExploreStars; APT


locked Re: Guiding questions

Jaimie Murdock
 

Hi Mirko,

I'm also fairly new to astrophotography, but I am also using the same software setup as you with the ES PMC-8 iEXOS-100 and included a screenshot below. Your RMS numbers are very high.

The first thing I noticed with your screenshot is the focus on your guidecam - it is very out-of-focus. While the guidecam is more tolerant to being out-of-focus, a 2-second exposure should show pin-point stars.

I guide with Via set to "ES iEXOS-100 PMC-Eight". This uses the USB cable for pulse guiding. I have not tried to use the ST-4 cable at all. It is not a part of my setup.  

The five biggest factors for successful guiding, so far:
1. Balance - ensuring that the scope is balanced in both RA and Dec, using the instructions in the manual.
2. Guidecam Focus - Having pinpoint stars reduces variance between exposures, increases accuracy.
3. Box Size - 16 has worked really well for me
4. Star selection - A star that is bright and stretches to the box size is ideal.
5. Remove Guidescope Flexure - make sure the guidecam is mounted securely to the primary scope. Mine was a little loose, causing maddening issues when the slightest bit of wind hit the scope and wobbled the actual camera.

I hope this helps!

Best, 
Jaimie


image.png


On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 11:54 AM Mirko Gude <mgude@...> wrote:
Hi,

because I've made some progress in setting up my equipment, I'am now able to spend some time for guiding. At the beginning there was no time for this, there were so many other questions so solve :-)

In the past months I've made some attempts to use guiding to achieve longer exposures. I'am using Indi/EKOS with a Raspberry Pi and EKOS provides a guiding function. First, I had the idea, that guiding will compensate a rough polar alignment, but after some attempts, I think that a good polar alignment is also important for guiding :-)

Very often I get a message like this:
"Guide DEC: Scope count not reach the start point after 21 iterations
Possible mount or backlash problems"

How could I check, If I have a issue with the mount (iEXOS 100 in this case)?

There are also two options to use the guiding camera. EKOS offers "via Camera" or "via ES iXEOS 100" in a menu. I've chosen via ES iEXOS 100, because i was to lazy to search the cable. My second question is, If it makes an important difference If I use this way or If it is better to connect the guiding camera directly with the mount (from Autoguider (ST4) Port camera to Autoguider (ST4) Port mount) ?

Third question is about the guiding rate. EKOS has an option for this and the default ist 0,5. Should I change this? (s. screenshot, it shows also the setting for guiding via, but this is in german). I found in the PMC_Eight_ProgrammersReferenceManual that the sidereal rate is 48. So maybe I should adjust the value to 0.48?

I will also attach a second screenshot, in this case guiding was working for some time. Maybe somebody has a hint what I could improve? 

Thanks and best Regards,
Mirko

--

Mounts: ES PMC-8 IEXOS 100, ES EXOS2-GT 
Scopes: Skywatcher 80/600, TS Photoline 72/432mm-Apo
Cameras:  Nikon Z6, D7000, ZWO ASI385 Color, QHY 5L-II-mono
Lens: Sigma 150-600mm, Sigma Art 135mm/1,8, Nikon Z 50mm/1,8, Tamron 70-200mm
Msc: LRTimelapse Pro Timer 2.5, Raspberry Pi4, Polemaster, GPS Dongle, QHY miniGuideScope
Software: PixInsight, Kstars, Starry Night, Redshift


--
Mount: ES PMC-8 iEXOS-100
Scope: William Optics ZenithStar 61II w/ UniGuide 32mm
Cameras: Canon EOS 1100D (Rebel T3), QHY-5-III-462C
Software: KStars on Astroberry, DeepSkyStacker and Photoshop


Re: Android and Amazon Fire ExploreStars has been updated #ExploreStars #ExploreScientific

Patrick Maher
 

Deciding that there is no pressing need for updating the Windows version of ExploreStars is very disappointing to me.  I have no use for Android and I definitely have no use for iPad.  I already use Windows for the serial connection and astrophotography so I have been hoping for continued upgrades and support for the Windows platform for ExploreStars.  Maybe I am in the minority but since I use ASCOM with Windows, I use Windows for ExploreStars too.  

This comes as quite a surprise to me and gives me something to seriously think about for the direction to go in the future.

Patrick
--
Explore Scientific iEXOS-100 and EXOS-2GT (non-PMC)
Explore Scientific ED 102mm Refractor


locked Guiding questions

Mirko Gude
 

Hi,

because I've made some progress in setting up my equipment, I'am now able to spend some time for guiding. At the beginning there was no time for this, there were so many other questions so solve :-)

In the past months I've made some attempts to use guiding to achieve longer exposures. I'am using Indi/EKOS with a Raspberry Pi and EKOS provides a guiding function. First, I had the idea, that guiding will compensate a rough polar alignment, but after some attempts, I think that a good polar alignment is also important for guiding :-)

Very often I get a message like this:
"Guide DEC: Scope count not reach the start point after 21 iterations
Possible mount or backlash problems"

How could I check, If I have a issue with the mount (iEXOS 100 in this case)?

There are also two options to use the guiding camera. EKOS offers "via Camera" or "via ES iXEOS 100" in a menu. I've chosen via ES iEXOS 100, because i was to lazy to search the cable. My second question is, If it makes an important difference If I use this way or If it is better to connect the guiding camera directly with the mount (from Autoguider (ST4) Port camera to Autoguider (ST4) Port mount) ?

Third question is about the guiding rate. EKOS has an option for this and the default ist 0,5. Should I change this? (s. screenshot, it shows also the setting for guiding via, but this is in german). I found in the PMC_Eight_ProgrammersReferenceManual that the sidereal rate is 48. So maybe I should adjust the value to 0.48?

I will also attach a second screenshot, in this case guiding was working for some time. Maybe somebody has a hint what I could improve? 

Thanks and best Regards,
Mirko

--

Mounts: ES PMC-8 IEXOS 100, ES EXOS2-GT 
Scopes: Skywatcher 80/600, TS Photoline 72/432mm-Apo
Cameras:  Nikon Z6, D7000, ZWO ASI385 Color, QHY 5L-II-mono
Lens: Sigma 150-600mm, Sigma Art 135mm/1,8, Nikon Z 50mm/1,8, Tamron 70-200mm
Msc: LRTimelapse Pro Timer 2.5, Raspberry Pi4, Polemaster, GPS Dongle, QHY miniGuideScope
Software: PixInsight, Kstars, Starry Night, Redshift


Re: Android and Amazon Fire ExploreStars has been updated #ExploreStars #ExploreScientific

Aaron Thompson
 

Hello Brian,  I am jumping in a little late in this conversation.  

Here is a download link for the Android Explore Stars page.  

https://explorescientificusa.com/pages/android-os-download

Here is a direct link to the Explore Stars Database files for the Android version of the app and contains the SQL database file needed for this version of the app. 

http://02d3287.netsolhost.com/pmc-eight/ES_Android_DB_Images.zip

Make sure an place the contents of the zip file on the SD card of your tablet.  

 

The Windows version uses a different database package and can be found here. 

https://explorescientificusa.com/pages/microsoft-windows-10-explorestars-app-download

 

Does this help you get the app back into working order?

 

Cheers

Aaron


Re: Android and Amazon Fire ExploreStars has been updated #ExploreStars #ExploreScientific

brian skinner
 

Hi chaps, I fully appreciate the efforts ES go to to try and solve issues that are thrown up by customers who on occasions do struggle with this very absorbing hobby. However, I would appreciate it if somebody could explain why I am having problems with this latest versions of the ES App and or  the database. I have been using older versions of both with no difficulty for a few years now. In particular I would like to understand why the latest sqlite file is not included in the database zip file, as my feeling is that is the cause of my problem.
If necessary I would happily go back to using both previous versions of the app and data base if this was possible?
Many thanks as always,
Brian Skinner
iEXOS100
Canon 1300d dslr
Various lenses
ES Polar scope
Sequator image stacker
PIXR image editor


Re: Newbies request for help again

Ian Morison
 

Hi Jeff,
   you can find when the Sun is due south using Stellarium.  Include the meridian line - under the Markings page accessed from the left hand vertical panel -  and expand the region around the Sun so that, by adjusting the time, you can see when the meridian line cuts across the Sun and the time will be when the Sun is due south.  At this time a shadow will point exactly true north.
Stellarium showed that today, the Sun will be due south at 17:35 UT.
Cheers,
Ian


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Android and Amazon Fire ExploreStars has been updated #ExploreStars #ExploreScientific

Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering
 

On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 02:14 PM, Jeff Hogan wrote:
I couldn’t understand why it couldn’t just be downloaded off of your servers and why it had to be tied to a Windows Store.

This is the only program I have ever had to use the Windows Store to get.
HI Jeff, 

I can understand you not understanding because you don't know the development history of the ExploreStars application. ExploreStars was originally developed in 2013 in the heyday of Windows 8. WIndows 8 was an atrocious version of windows where they tried to force the desktop operating system to work like a phone application. These were very restricted applications (security wise, and other ways) called Metro apps that did not give you any direct access to the hardware on your desktop and forced you to only be able to download and install applications from the Windows Store. This is still where we are with the Windows version of ExploreStars and this is why you have to go there to get it.

Why we have not released a better  version of the Windows app for the windows tablet is because there isn't any real demand for it and we concentrated our resources (which are fewer than most of our customers realize) on the Android and iPad platforms.
 
--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


Re: Android and Amazon Fire ExploreStars has been updated #ExploreStars #ExploreScientific

Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering
 

Hi Luke,

Of course we would be doing that if it was possible, but both the Windows app store and the Google Play store set requirements for user experience downloading and installing applications that require the app to install quickly. This means that the amount of data that can be installed with the application is very limited. That is why we have to separate the very large object database we have from the application. 

We always try and do things that make it easy for our customers. If the platform we are working with restrict us in certain ways we have to make an engineering decision on how to bring the features we want our customers to enjoy via a work around that may not be the most convenient for our customers. We think the greater good of bringing the feature to our customer is outweighed by the temporary inconvenience that the work around causes. Different people will have different opinions about weighing one against the other, but as the manufacturer we make the decision which way to go and we deal with the consequences of our decisions.

Thanks.
--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


Re: Newbies request for help again

James Ball
 

"I have no issue with everything talking to each other if I tell the telescope that point to Polaris it starts moving and whirring but sometimes it's points straight up in the air."

The scope needs to be pointed towards Polaris before you power on the mount, that is how it knows where it is.  By default the mount thinks it is pointed at Polaris when it boots up, and when the Explorestars App is turned on it will begin at Polaris.  Then you look through the scope and physically adjust the right left and up down to center Polaris in your scope.  (Polaris is not dead center of true north but it is close for beginning)

This is a screenshot of Stellarium showing Polaris (white dot near center) with the Celestial Pole at the center of the blue lines, that would be the exact point of Polar Alignment, you can use Stellarium to see where it is exactly in your location and current time.  Polaris will move around the Pole through the year from our point of view so using Polaris to align the scope you have to know where it is in relation to the Pole for each day and time.



Once you have it close, then you can do the two or three star alignment which will correct for any error you still have.  For best results pickup an eyepiece with an illuminated crosshair when doing the alignments.

As mentioned, Sharpcap Pro will do an even better job of getting the alignment correct but you will need an astro camera inserted in place of the eyepiece, or in a guide scope, I don't think that would work if using a smartphone.

I really enjoy my iEXOS-100 but it took me a lot of reading to figure out just how to set it up.  Good luck and keep asking questions, it is the best way to learn.
--
James Ball
Dawson Springs, Ky
Mounts: iEXOS-100
Scopes: Meade ETX90RA(deforked now) Sky Watcher 150MCT
Camera: ZWO ASI 120MC-S
Software: Explore Stars Android, ASCOM, Stellarium Scope, Stellarium, AS!3, SharpCap, RegiStax6.


Re: Newbies request for help again

 

Jeff,

This picture is a bit fuzzy, but it looks to me like "Scope Type"  says "G11".    I don't use Explorestars, but if you have an iExos-100, I think it should be set to that - the mounts have different motor counts and gearing...

[Jerry - maybe change that label from "Scope Type" to "Mount Type" ?]


On Wed, Mar 10, 2021, at 18:29, Jeff Hogan wrote:

Thanks Ian,

 

Yes, I do have my latitude and longitude programmed into ExploreStars

 

 


 

 

The above is a screenshot (though it’s not connected at the moment).  When you are recommending that I adjust things are you meaning through the app or manually.

 

 

 

 

*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ian Morison via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 1:20 PM
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Newbies request for help again

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 

Hi Harry,

              Do you know your latitude and longitude?  If not, can you send your town and city so I can work out how much you need to offset from magnetic north.

 

There is a way  to set it up when you can next see the Moon at night.

 

Assuming that the mount is level and that the polar axis is set to your latitude,  slew to the Moon - probably nowhere near.  Now adjust the mount in Azimuth, that is rotate the equatorial head round to bring the Moon as near as you can using your lowest power eyepiece.  If you then look up along the polar axis, you may be able to spot Polaris.  Anyway restart the mount and slew to the Moon again.  It should be much closer. Again adjust the mount's position  (by rotation mostly, but perhaps some latitude adjustment) bring to bring the Moon closer still.  Try again and hopefully it will be in the field of view.  Now make sure that have something that is true north visible nearby from your mount's position - I have a mark on a fence -  but now it should be pretty obvious which star is Polaris for future setting up.

 

More help if needed.

Its a great little mount!

 

Cheers,

Ian

 

 


On Wednesday, March 10, 2021, Harry via groups.io <flykai1=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hi Jeff,

Welcome!! A little more info would be great and helpful. What telescope or camera are you using? How are you controlling or connecting to the iExos100 mount? Are you using the ExploreStars app and if so with what kind of device? IPad, Android, Windows? What kind of power source? Battery, portable power supply, house 110?

There are lots of great people here to get you going!

Harry
--
Harry
Vero Beach, FL

Mounts: ES iExos 100-PMC Eight
Scopes: ES  ED80CF, ES AR102,  Meade ETX 90 EC (Deforked)
Guide: ZWO 30mm Mini, ZWO ASI120MM-Mini
Software: ASIair Pro, iPad Pro, MacOS, Affinity Photo, SkySafari Plus
Cameras: Nikon D600, D5500 (UV/IR Mod)
Misc: ES USB Power Bank

Filters:  Optolong L-Pro, L-eNhance





Attachments:
  • image002.jpg


--
Mounts: ES PMC-8 EXOS2
Scopes: SV 102EDT, ZWO 60/280 Guide
Cameras:  Nikon D5300, Altair GPCAM2 290M
Software: ASCOM, CdC, AstroTortilla, BYN Pro, Sharpcap, PHD2
Computer:  Thinkpad x230, Win7Pro/64


Re: Newbies request for help again

Frank Rich
 

I believe the gentleman is referring to polar scope align. You need the pro version to do daytime alignment 

Frank

On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 4:30 PM shredderf16 <Shredderf16@...> wrote:

Sky and Telescope had an article 2 months ago about using a plumb bob and string to make a sundial. At local noon the shadow points true north. Then use an angle finder app to transfer angle to mount. I couldn't find "Solar Polar Align" in the Google play store.
Jerry Barth



On March 11, 2021, at 2:49 PM, Andrew Houseman <andrew.e.houseman@...> wrote:


You can get well within 1/2 degree during the day with a little app called 'Solar Polar Align'  and a cheap digital angle finder.

With no scope, set alt adjustment at 0, so the dovetail saddle is flat and put the phone on it where the scope would normally go. Solar Polar Align' computes the shadow angle of a vertical object, so you adjust the Az to make the shadow and line on phone match. It is much, much more accurate than a compass.

Then put the angle finder in the saddle and set the Alt to exactly where the angle finder matches your latitude. Now attach the scope.

Come nightfall, fine tune with SharpCap, but at least you will be starting out extremely close to true north.

Keep in minds, polaris is not exactly at the pole and there will be some cone error with the scope, so you may not actually see polaris through it, but the important thing is to align the mount to true north.

On Thu, Mar 11, 2021, 8:36 AM Jeff Hogan <jhogan1@...> wrote:

Thanks Ian

 

I’ll see if I can follow this.

 

*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ian Morison via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 2:55 AM
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Newbies request for help again

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 

Hi Jeff,

     The latitude is to adjust the tilt of the polar axis.   Adjust to bring the pointer on the side (above the squiggly orange symbol) to the angle of your latitude  28 degrees.

I guess that you live off Paulette Street.   The attached image shows the difference between magnetic north and true north which will be 6.5 degrees to the right in angle to the direction given by your compass.   Put some tape down to the north of your mount along true north (ie just to the right of your compass direction) and then align the polar axis along this line.

Then, at night, you should be able to spot Polaris if you squint along the polar axis -  and may even be able to see it through the sighting hole.  If you can, you are well aligned for most things.  After dark slew to M42, the Orion nebula, it lies in the sword of Orion as seen in my pic.  I also append the Stellarium view towards the south southwest from your location after dark tonight.  This program is free so do download it!

If this doesn't work, the Moon will be around again soon.

 

I do hope this helps.

Cheers,

Ian


Re: Newbies request for help again

shredderf16
 

Sky and Telescope had an article 2 months ago about using a plumb bob and string to make a sundial. At local noon the shadow points true north. Then use an angle finder app to transfer angle to mount. I couldn't find "Solar Polar Align" in the Google play store.
Jerry Barth



On March 11, 2021, at 2:49 PM, Andrew Houseman <andrew.e.houseman@...> wrote:


You can get well within 1/2 degree during the day with a little app called 'Solar Polar Align'  and a cheap digital angle finder.

With no scope, set alt adjustment at 0, so the dovetail saddle is flat and put the phone on it where the scope would normally go. Solar Polar Align' computes the shadow angle of a vertical object, so you adjust the Az to make the shadow and line on phone match. It is much, much more accurate than a compass.

Then put the angle finder in the saddle and set the Alt to exactly where the angle finder matches your latitude. Now attach the scope.

Come nightfall, fine tune with SharpCap, but at least you will be starting out extremely close to true north.

Keep in minds, polaris is not exactly at the pole and there will be some cone error with the scope, so you may not actually see polaris through it, but the important thing is to align the mount to true north.

On Thu, Mar 11, 2021, 8:36 AM Jeff Hogan <jhogan1@...> wrote:

Thanks Ian

 

I’ll see if I can follow this.

 

*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ian Morison via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 2:55 AM
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Newbies request for help again

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 

Hi Jeff,

     The latitude is to adjust the tilt of the polar axis.   Adjust to bring the pointer on the side (above the squiggly orange symbol) to the angle of your latitude  28 degrees.

I guess that you live off Paulette Street.   The attached image shows the difference between magnetic north and true north which will be 6.5 degrees to the right in angle to the direction given by your compass.   Put some tape down to the north of your mount along true north (ie just to the right of your compass direction) and then align the polar axis along this line.

Then, at night, you should be able to spot Polaris if you squint along the polar axis -  and may even be able to see it through the sighting hole.  If you can, you are well aligned for most things.  After dark slew to M42, the Orion nebula, it lies in the sword of Orion as seen in my pic.  I also append the Stellarium view towards the south southwest from your location after dark tonight.  This program is free so do download it!

If this doesn't work, the Moon will be around again soon.

 

I do hope this helps.

Cheers,

Ian


Re: Newbies request for help again

Andrew Houseman
 

You can get well within 1/2 degree during the day with a little app called 'Solar Polar Align'  and a cheap digital angle finder.

With no scope, set alt adjustment at 0, so the dovetail saddle is flat and put the phone on it where the scope would normally go. Solar Polar Align' computes the shadow angle of a vertical object, so you adjust the Az to make the shadow and line on phone match. It is much, much more accurate than a compass.

Then put the angle finder in the saddle and set the Alt to exactly where the angle finder matches your latitude. Now attach the scope.

Come nightfall, fine tune with SharpCap, but at least you will be starting out extremely close to true north.

Keep in minds, polaris is not exactly at the pole and there will be some cone error with the scope, so you may not actually see polaris through it, but the important thing is to align the mount to true north.

On Thu, Mar 11, 2021, 8:36 AM Jeff Hogan <jhogan1@...> wrote:

Thanks Ian

 

I’ll see if I can follow this.

 

*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ian Morison via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 2:55 AM
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Newbies request for help again

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 

Hi Jeff,

     The latitude is to adjust the tilt of the polar axis.   Adjust to bring the pointer on the side (above the squiggly orange symbol) to the angle of your latitude  28 degrees.

I guess that you live off Paulette Street.   The attached image shows the difference between magnetic north and true north which will be 6.5 degrees to the right in angle to the direction given by your compass.   Put some tape down to the north of your mount along true north (ie just to the right of your compass direction) and then align the polar axis along this line.

Then, at night, you should be able to spot Polaris if you squint along the polar axis -  and may even be able to see it through the sighting hole.  If you can, you are well aligned for most things.  After dark slew to M42, the Orion nebula, it lies in the sword of Orion as seen in my pic.  I also append the Stellarium view towards the south southwest from your location after dark tonight.  This program is free so do download it!

If this doesn't work, the Moon will be around again soon.

 

I do hope this helps.

Cheers,

Ian

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