Date   

Issue with exos pcm100 #tracking #EXOS2 #alignment #ExploreStars

jamescasey00@...
 

I am having issues with trying to track on the pcm100 I was wondering if anyone can help. I have a polar scope and I also tried using  explore stars app on the iPad and I still can’t track. Please help?


Re: introductions from Florida

Jeff Weiss
 


streaming the conjunction live


On Mon, Dec 21, 2020 at 5:38 PM Jeff Hogan <jhogan1@...> wrote:

We could see Jupiter with our eyes; but, I never could even get it in the viewfinder.  When I turned the red light/laser on it seemed to make it worse.

Nothing I did could get it to actually be visible in the viewfinder or the scope.

 

 

*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jeff Weiss via groups.io
Sent: Monday, December 21, 2020 8:35 PM
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] introductions from Florida

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 

Having your finder scope aligned with your telescope will help immensely. Try doing this in the daytime with a far away object.

 

On Mon, Dec 21, 2020 at 5:32 PM Jeff Hogan <jhogan1@...> wrote:

 

Unfortunately it was a bust for us tonight.  I blame my inexperience mostly.  I tried to manually get Jupiter and Saturn into the scope as all of my attempts to Polar Align over the past week had failed. 

When I got the Moon in the viewfinder earlier I got a false sense of confidence.  It was daylight and the Moon was so much bigger than the Jupiter/Saturn moment. 

I appreciate those that went out of there way to assist me and my next steps will be back to figuring out how to Polar Align this scope so it could have found Jupiter for us.

*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jeff Hogan via groups.io
Sent: Monday, December 21, 2020 5:34 PM
To: ESPMC-Eight@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] introductions from Florida

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 

They're all at least seven planes in the sky at 5:30 p.m. seeding the clouds  and the clouds are bright red over here in Central Florida.  

 

We were able to get a great view of the Moon a few moments ago so I'm able to get the telescope aligned on Target nicely but now I'm not fearing that the clouds that have just been created by all of those planes are going to obstruct our view.

 

 

 

On Dec 20, 2020 9:57 AM, Jeff Hogan <jhogan1@...> wrote:

Hi,

 

My name is Jeff and I am writing from a city in Florida named Apopka.  We bought the Explore Scientific Telescope (iexs-100) along with the PMC-Eight mount.

I have been trying for about four days to align it to Polaris without luck and I place 90% of the blame on me.  This is a pretty heavy system and it’s not one we can leave outside so I’m not quite understanding why this appears to be so complicated to setup to use.

98% of my issue is with getting it aligned to Polaris.   The other 90% of my issue is not even knowing accurately where Magnetic North is where I’m located.   I’ve downloaded about every app I can find and using my old army compass.  The digital apps (on the tablet and phone) north seems to move based on where I happen to stand. 

I also understand the handheld compass is going to find true north and not magnetic north which the mount appears to need. 

I’m just hoping to have someone educate me on how to accurately align my telescope (even on a cloudy night) to function.  We really want to see Jupiter and Saturn tomorrow night.

 

 

 

 


Re: introductions from Florida

Jeff Hogan
 

We could see Jupiter with our eyes; but, I never could even get it in the viewfinder.  When I turned the red light/laser on it seemed to make it worse.

Nothing I did could get it to actually be visible in the viewfinder or the scope.

 

 

*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jeff Weiss via groups.io
Sent: Monday, December 21, 2020 8:35 PM
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] introductions from Florida

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 

Having your finder scope aligned with your telescope will help immensely. Try doing this in the daytime with a far away object.

 

On Mon, Dec 21, 2020 at 5:32 PM Jeff Hogan <jhogan1@...> wrote:

 

Unfortunately it was a bust for us tonight.  I blame my inexperience mostly.  I tried to manually get Jupiter and Saturn into the scope as all of my attempts to Polar Align over the past week had failed. 

When I got the Moon in the viewfinder earlier I got a false sense of confidence.  It was daylight and the Moon was so much bigger than the Jupiter/Saturn moment. 

I appreciate those that went out of there way to assist me and my next steps will be back to figuring out how to Polar Align this scope so it could have found Jupiter for us.

*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jeff Hogan via groups.io
Sent: Monday, December 21, 2020 5:34 PM
To: ESPMC-Eight@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] introductions from Florida

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 

They're all at least seven planes in the sky at 5:30 p.m. seeding the clouds  and the clouds are bright red over here in Central Florida.  

 

We were able to get a great view of the Moon a few moments ago so I'm able to get the telescope aligned on Target nicely but now I'm not fearing that the clouds that have just been created by all of those planes are going to obstruct our view.

 

 

 

On Dec 20, 2020 9:57 AM, Jeff Hogan <jhogan1@...> wrote:

Hi,

 

My name is Jeff and I am writing from a city in Florida named Apopka.  We bought the Explore Scientific Telescope (iexs-100) along with the PMC-Eight mount.

I have been trying for about four days to align it to Polaris without luck and I place 90% of the blame on me.  This is a pretty heavy system and it’s not one we can leave outside so I’m not quite understanding why this appears to be so complicated to setup to use.

98% of my issue is with getting it aligned to Polaris.   The other 90% of my issue is not even knowing accurately where Magnetic North is where I’m located.   I’ve downloaded about every app I can find and using my old army compass.  The digital apps (on the tablet and phone) north seems to move based on where I happen to stand. 

I also understand the handheld compass is going to find true north and not magnetic north which the mount appears to need. 

I’m just hoping to have someone educate me on how to accurately align my telescope (even on a cloudy night) to function.  We really want to see Jupiter and Saturn tomorrow night.

 

 

 

 


Re: introductions from Florida

Jeff Weiss
 

Having your finder scope aligned with your telescope will help immensely. Try doing this in the daytime with a far away object.

On Mon, Dec 21, 2020 at 5:32 PM Jeff Hogan <jhogan1@...> wrote:

 

Unfortunately it was a bust for us tonight.  I blame my inexperience mostly.  I tried to manually get Jupiter and Saturn into the scope as all of my attempts to Polar Align over the past week had failed. 

When I got the Moon in the viewfinder earlier I got a false sense of confidence.  It was daylight and the Moon was so much bigger than the Jupiter/Saturn moment. 

I appreciate those that went out of there way to assist me and my next steps will be back to figuring out how to Polar Align this scope so it could have found Jupiter for us.


*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jeff Hogan via groups.io
Sent: Monday, December 21, 2020 5:34 PM
To: ESPMC-Eight@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] introductions from Florida

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 

They're all at least seven planes in the sky at 5:30 p.m. seeding the clouds  and the clouds are bright red over here in Central Florida.  

 

We were able to get a great view of the Moon a few moments ago so I'm able to get the telescope aligned on Target nicely but now I'm not fearing that the clouds that have just been created by all of those planes are going to obstruct our view.

 

 

 

On Dec 20, 2020 9:57 AM, Jeff Hogan <jhogan1@...> wrote:

Hi,

 

My name is Jeff and I am writing from a city in Florida named Apopka.  We bought the Explore Scientific Telescope (iexs-100) along with the PMC-Eight mount.

I have been trying for about four days to align it to Polaris without luck and I place 90% of the blame on me.  This is a pretty heavy system and it’s not one we can leave outside so I’m not quite understanding why this appears to be so complicated to setup to use.

98% of my issue is with getting it aligned to Polaris.   The other 90% of my issue is not even knowing accurately where Magnetic North is where I’m located.   I’ve downloaded about every app I can find and using my old army compass.  The digital apps (on the tablet and phone) north seems to move based on where I happen to stand. 

I also understand the handheld compass is going to find true north and not magnetic north which the mount appears to need. 

I’m just hoping to have someone educate me on how to accurately align my telescope (even on a cloudy night) to function.  We really want to see Jupiter and Saturn tomorrow night.

 

 

 

 


Re: introductions from Florida

Jeff Hogan
 

 

Unfortunately it was a bust for us tonight.  I blame my inexperience mostly.  I tried to manually get Jupiter and Saturn into the scope as all of my attempts to Polar Align over the past week had failed. 

When I got the Moon in the viewfinder earlier I got a false sense of confidence.  It was daylight and the Moon was so much bigger than the Jupiter/Saturn moment. 

I appreciate those that went out of there way to assist me and my next steps will be back to figuring out how to Polar Align this scope so it could have found Jupiter for us.


*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jeff Hogan via groups.io
Sent: Monday, December 21, 2020 5:34 PM
To: ESPMC-Eight@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] introductions from Florida

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 

They're all at least seven planes in the sky at 5:30 p.m. seeding the clouds  and the clouds are bright red over here in Central Florida.  

 

We were able to get a great view of the Moon a few moments ago so I'm able to get the telescope aligned on Target nicely but now I'm not fearing that the clouds that have just been created by all of those planes are going to obstruct our view.

 

 

 

On Dec 20, 2020 9:57 AM, Jeff Hogan <jhogan1@...> wrote:

Hi,

 

My name is Jeff and I am writing from a city in Florida named Apopka.  We bought the Explore Scientific Telescope (iexs-100) along with the PMC-Eight mount.

I have been trying for about four days to align it to Polaris without luck and I place 90% of the blame on me.  This is a pretty heavy system and it’s not one we can leave outside so I’m not quite understanding why this appears to be so complicated to setup to use.

98% of my issue is with getting it aligned to Polaris.   The other 90% of my issue is not even knowing accurately where Magnetic North is where I’m located.   I’ve downloaded about every app I can find and using my old army compass.  The digital apps (on the tablet and phone) north seems to move based on where I happen to stand. 

I also understand the handheld compass is going to find true north and not magnetic north which the mount appears to need. 

I’m just hoping to have someone educate me on how to accurately align my telescope (even on a cloudy night) to function.  We really want to see Jupiter and Saturn tomorrow night.

 

 

 

 


Re: introductions from Florida

Frank Rich
 

Hello Jeff
I too am a newbie having trouble with polar alignment. I may be wrong but I believe you need to align with true North 
My setup routine will be to set the mount pointing North. Use an I phone app called polar align. But confirm everything using “Sharp Cap”. As soon as Santa brings my ZWO guide camera
Then again I have personally met and relied upon a vey knowledgeable member who lives near me

Good luck
Frank

On Mon, Dec 21, 2020 at 5:37 PM Jeff Hogan <jhogan1@...> wrote:

On Dec 20, 2020 9:57 AM, Jeff Hogan <jhogan1@...> wrote:

Hi,

 

My name is Jeff and I am writing from a city in Florida named Apopka.  We bought the Explore Scientific Telescope (iexs-100) along with the PMC-Eight mount.

I have been trying for about four days to align it to Polaris without luck and I place 90% of the blame on me.  This is a pretty heavy system and it’s not one we can leave outside so I’m not quite understanding why this appears to be so complicated to setup to use.

98% of my issue is with getting it aligned to Polaris.   The other 90% of my issue is not even knowing accurately where Magnetic North is where I’m located.   I’ve downloaded about every app I can find and using my old army compass.  The digital apps (on the tablet and phone) north seems to move based on where I happen to stand. 

I also understand the handheld compass is going to find true north and not magnetic north which the mount appears to need. 

I’m just hoping to have someone educate me on how to accurately align my telescope (even on a cloudy night) to function.  We really want to see Jupiter and Saturn tomorrow night.

 

 

 

 


Re: introductions from Florida

Jeff Hogan
 


On Dec 20, 2020 9:57 AM, Jeff Hogan <jhogan1@...> wrote:

Hi,

 

My name is Jeff and I am writing from a city in Florida named Apopka.  We bought the Explore Scientific Telescope (iexs-100) along with the PMC-Eight mount.

I have been trying for about four days to align it to Polaris without luck and I place 90% of the blame on me.  This is a pretty heavy system and it’s not one we can leave outside so I’m not quite understanding why this appears to be so complicated to setup to use.

98% of my issue is with getting it aligned to Polaris.   The other 90% of my issue is not even knowing accurately where Magnetic North is where I’m located.   I’ve downloaded about every app I can find and using my old army compass.  The digital apps (on the tablet and phone) north seems to move based on where I happen to stand. 

I also understand the handheld compass is going to find true north and not magnetic north which the mount appears to need. 

I’m just hoping to have someone educate me on how to accurately align my telescope (even on a cloudy night) to function.  We really want to see Jupiter and Saturn tomorrow night.

 

 

 

 


Re: introductions from Florida

Jeff Hogan
 

They're all at least seven planes in the sky at 5:30 p.m. seeding the clouds  and the clouds are bright red over here in Central Florida.  

We were able to get a great view of the Moon a few moments ago so I'm able to get the telescope aligned on Target nicely but now I'm not fearing that the clouds that have just been created by all of those planes are going to obstruct our view.



On Dec 20, 2020 9:57 AM, Jeff Hogan <jhogan1@...> wrote:

Hi,

 

My name is Jeff and I am writing from a city in Florida named Apopka.  We bought the Explore Scientific Telescope (iexs-100) along with the PMC-Eight mount.

I have been trying for about four days to align it to Polaris without luck and I place 90% of the blame on me.  This is a pretty heavy system and it’s not one we can leave outside so I’m not quite understanding why this appears to be so complicated to setup to use.

98% of my issue is with getting it aligned to Polaris.   The other 90% of my issue is not even knowing accurately where Magnetic North is where I’m located.   I’ve downloaded about every app I can find and using my old army compass.  The digital apps (on the tablet and phone) north seems to move based on where I happen to stand. 

I also understand the handheld compass is going to find true north and not magnetic north which the mount appears to need. 

I’m just hoping to have someone educate me on how to accurately align my telescope (even on a cloudy night) to function.  We really want to see Jupiter and Saturn tomorrow night.

 

 

 

 


Re: New EXOS2 PMC8 mount?

Patrick Maher
 

That's good to hear, Jerry. 

Do you have any idea when the EXOS2-GT PMC-8 will be back in stock?  The ES website indicates it will be back in stock in November.  I'm thinking that date has come and gone and ES isn't referring to November, 2021.  

Of course, I'm also interested in getting an idea of at least which quarter of 2021 we can hope to see the EXOS-200. 

Thanks Jerry.

Patrick
--
Explore Scientific iEXOS-100 and EXOS-2GT (non-PMC)
Explore Scientific ED 102mm Refractor


Re: Astrophotography Done with the iEXOS-100, EXOS 2, and G11 Post your Pictures and Details! Lets Show What These Mounts Can Do. #G11 #astrophotography #iEXOS-100 #EXOS2

Dave Cherry
 

Thanks Wes, Good luck with it. Its a devilishly tricky little blighter

You will need various exposures to get everything.

 

Cheers

Dave

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Wes Mcdonald
Sent: 21 December 2020 20:28
To: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Astrophotography Done with the iEXOS-100, EXOS 2, and G11 Post your Pictures and Details! Lets Show What These Mounts Can Do. #iexos-100 #EXOS2 #G11 #astrophotography

 

Looks pretty good to me!   Trying tonight with busted equipment but not pmc8.  Tomorrow I will have a go with the iexos I believe and an etx 90.  If I can figure out how to hook my camera to it and get it in focus.   

 

Wes

 

On Mon, Dec 21, 2020 at 3:25 PM Dave Cherry <andromedacity@...> wrote:

Whoops blank msg there, sorry

Hi Guys, Thought Id share the conjunction I got,  I packed away my 200pds newt so this was a skywatcher 72 ed with the very nice Luminos 2.5X Barlow
Got them both in the frame, so that's good.
Its Ok, but I'm not a planetary guy normally but im please I actually got something.
Not much for the PMC to do here, I just just did an eyeball polar align and it tracked flawlessly.
In fact,  I went inside for 20 mins, came out, the planets were still dead center!
How bout that mount!

Cheers
Dave

--
Scopes: Sky Watcher 200PDS, Skywatcher 72ED
Mount: Explore Scientific PMC8 EXO2
Cameras: ASI 294MCPRO Coooled, Altair guide cam + 50mm scope
Software: Sharpcap Pro ,PH2, Stelarium Startools


--
Wes, Southport NC
EXos2-GT PMC-8, iExos 100
ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS+wedge, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90, 60mm no-name guide scope ~ 260mm FL
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG, ZWO 290MM, D5300 astro modified
Nina, Bootcamped Mac Mini control computer, RDP to iMAC
110 amp hour lead acid deep discharge battery for field power
Electrical Engineer, Retired

 


--
Scopes: Sky Watcher 200PDS, Skywatcher 72ED
Mount: Explore Scientific PMC8 EXO2
Cameras: ASI 294MCPRO Coooled, Altair guide cam + 50mm scope
Software: Sharpcap Pro ,PH2, Stelarium Startools


Re: Astrophotography Done with the iEXOS-100, EXOS 2, and G11 Post your Pictures and Details! Lets Show What These Mounts Can Do. #G11 #astrophotography #iEXOS-100 #EXOS2

Wes Mcdonald
 

Looks pretty good to me!   Trying tonight with busted equipment but not pmc8.  Tomorrow I will have a go with the iexos I believe and an etx 90.  If I can figure out how to hook my camera to it and get it in focus.   

Wes

On Mon, Dec 21, 2020 at 3:25 PM Dave Cherry <andromedacity@...> wrote:
Whoops blank msg there, sorry

Hi Guys, Thought Id share the conjunction I got,  I packed away my 200pds newt so this was a skywatcher 72 ed with the very nice Luminos 2.5X Barlow
Got them both in the frame, so that's good.
Its Ok, but I'm not a planetary guy normally but im please I actually got something.
Not much for the PMC to do here, I just just did an eyeball polar align and it tracked flawlessly.
In fact,  I went inside for 20 mins, came out, the planets were still dead center!
How bout that mount!

Cheers
Dave

--
Scopes: Sky Watcher 200PDS, Skywatcher 72ED
Mount: Explore Scientific PMC8 EXO2
Cameras: ASI 294MCPRO Coooled, Altair guide cam + 50mm scope
Software: Sharpcap Pro ,PH2, Stelarium Startools


--
Wes, Southport NC
EXos2-GT PMC-8, iExos 100
ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS+wedge, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90, 60mm no-name guide scope ~ 260mm FL
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG, ZWO 290MM, D5300 astro modified
Nina, Bootcamped Mac Mini control computer, RDP to iMAC
110 amp hour lead acid deep discharge battery for field power
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Re: Astrophotography Done with the iEXOS-100, EXOS 2, and G11 Post your Pictures and Details! Lets Show What These Mounts Can Do. #G11 #astrophotography #iEXOS-100 #EXOS2

Dave Cherry
 

Whoops blank msg there, sorry

Hi Guys, Thought Id share the conjunction I got,  I packed away my 200pds newt so this was a skywatcher 72 ed with the very nice Luminos 2.5X Barlow
Got them both in the frame, so that's good.
Its Ok, but I'm not a planetary guy normally but im please I actually got something.
Not much for the PMC to do here, I just just did an eyeball polar align and it tracked flawlessly.
In fact,  I went inside for 20 mins, came out, the planets were still dead center!
How bout that mount!

Cheers
Dave

--
Scopes: Sky Watcher 200PDS, Skywatcher 72ED
Mount: Explore Scientific PMC8 EXO2
Cameras: ASI 294MCPRO Coooled, Altair guide cam + 50mm scope
Software: Sharpcap Pro ,PH2, Stelarium Startools


Re: Astrophotography Done with the iEXOS-100, EXOS 2, and G11 Post your Pictures and Details! Lets Show What These Mounts Can Do. #G11 #astrophotography #iEXOS-100 #EXOS2

Dave Cherry
 


--
Scopes: Sky Watcher 200PDS, Skywatcher 72ED
Mount: Explore Scientific PMC8 EXO2
Cameras: ASI 294MCPRO Coooled, Altair guide cam + 50mm scope
Software: Sharpcap Pro ,PH2, Stelarium Startools


Re: New EXOS2 PMC8 mount?

 

Hi Jerry. 
             When will the juicy details and price be known. 


On 21 Dec 2020, at 19:29, Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering <jrh@...> wrote:

Hi David,

Welcome to the forum.  

I don't believe I ever said the EXOS 2 PMC-Eight was going to be phased out, in fact we have plans to continue to sell that model. We are planning to release a new mount called the iEXOS 200 that will improve upon the performance of the EXOS 2 PMC-Eight. It will be priced competitively against higher performing mounts that are better than the EXOS 2. The new iEXOS 200 will be released next year, stay tuned!
--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


--
Michael Whitaker
Wakefield, UK. 
MOUNTS. Exos-2 PMC Eight..
SCOPE: RVO Horizon 72ed. 
CAMERA: Not Applicable. 
SOFTWARE: Just iPad at moment. 


Re: New EXOS2 PMC8 mount?

Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering
 

Hi David,

Welcome to the forum.  

I don't believe I ever said the EXOS 2 PMC-Eight was going to be phased out, in fact we have plans to continue to sell that model. We are planning to release a new mount called the iEXOS 200 that will improve upon the performance of the EXOS 2 PMC-Eight. It will be priced competitively against higher performing mounts that are better than the EXOS 2. The new iEXOS 200 will be released next year, stay tuned!
--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


Re: introductions from Florida

Yorksman
 

If in a hurry, I use my 1exos-100 as a manual EQ mount. It's fine for things like the moon when there is a gap in the clouds. Like you say, a bit heavy but it does work almost as a run and go mount. Polar aligning is frustrating at first but I can do it now quite easily with the polar finder scope. The big step forward for me was to mount it on the opposite side, so the rhs rather than the lhs. Seemed easier for me to get my eye under it. It's taken me a few months, mostly because of the weather, but I am getting shots of more distant targets. Have to concentrate on getting better focus now. To get the most out of it requires practice and learning but, for a quick photo of the planets, you'll manage well with just manual.


New EXOS2 PMC8 mount?

David Aucoin
 

I read in another post that Jerry Hubbell stated that the EXOS2 PMC8 was going to be phased out at the end of the year and a new mount was in the works, by the end of the year. Has that new mount been established? When will it be coming out? Are there any specs on the new design? Will it replace the EXOS2 PMC8 mount? Is it in the same price range?

I am looking to buy the EXOS2 PMC8 mount, but if a newer mount is coming out, I would want to wait for that.

What information can you give me?

Thanks,
Dave Aucoin


Re: introductions from Florida

Wes Mcdonald
 

The clutches hold the mount axes tight to the rotating parts driven by the motors.  In the iexos these are the silver knobs one at the back of the mount head along the ra axis and one at the top of the weight bar.  When these are tight the mount won’t move except for the motors moving them.  When you loosen them you can swing the mint around by hand.  

One you are aligned you must never release the clutches when using the pmc8.  If you do the computer  will not j ow where the mount is.

Start the pmc8 with the mount pointing at the north celestial pole.  This is polar home. Before starting make sure the clutches are tight.  The. Use explorestars to move the mount.  Never release the clutches until you are done or ready to start over from a new cold boot.

Wes 

--
Wes, Southport NC
EXos2-GT PMC-8, iExos 100
ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS+wedge, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90, 60mm no-name guide scope ~ 260mm FL
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG, ZWO 290MM, D5300 astro modified
Nina, Bootcamped Mac Mini control computer, RDP to iMAC
110 amp hour lead acid deep discharge battery for field power
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Re: introductions from Florida

Jeff Hogan
 

Thanks.    What does release the clutches mean?

On Dec 20, 2020 11:45 AM, "Wes Mcdonald via groups.io" <wesmcd6@...> wrote:
EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

Jeff

Welcome to the group.

1.  The mount needs to be aligned with true north not magnetic.  

2.  Your iPhone compass can be set to display true rather than magnetic

3.  Google magnetic declination. Or maybe magnetic deviation and look up the error at your location.  Can’t speak to it there but mine is 10 degrees in NC.

4.   Put the mount down and level it as best you can.  Point the weight bar straight down and have the weight bar on the north of the mount

5.  Adjust the altitude bolt until the telescope tube is tilted up at the same angle as your latitude. 

6.  If you have a finder scope you can adjust the mechanical azimuth and altitude to center Polaris in the finder.   Before doing this be sure the telescope and finder are looking at the same object.  You can do this in daytime by pointing the scope at a distant object on earth line a cell tower, building top etc.  center the telescope on the thing and then adjust the finder scope to center it on the same thing.  This collimates two scopes.  At night then when you center something in the finder scope it will be in the mai. Scope field of view.  Use a low power eyepiece in the telescope when doing this.  Something like a 25 or 32 mm

7.  When you get things pretty much set up mechanically it is time to turn on the pmc8 and the explorestars app.   Connect your tablet to the mount 

8.  For viewing the planets if you have the scope pointing at Polaris at turn on you are probably good to go.   Just tell explorestars to go to the planet.  It won’t hit it but it should put the planet in the finder field of view.  The. Use the left-right-up-down arrows on explorestars to center the planet in the finder and then using the low power eyepiece center it in the telescope.  Once centered press the sync button in explorestars and things should work for you.  Be sure the little triangle icon in explorestars is showing P for point mode.  You can change it from T to P by pressing it.

9.  To use the LRDU buttons you swill want to set the slew rate.  This is done by pressing one of the number buttons.  0 is very slow,9 is the fastest.  I use 3 or 4 to center.  Just touch a number which will be reflected in the center of the LRDU button cluster so you can see what rate you have

10.  Practice all this in daytime.  Don’t point to the sun.  Get used to it all before you need it Monday.  If you can get out tonight also after practicing today and getting your scope collimated with the finder you will be ahead of the game. 

11.  What scope do you have?  What mount ?  Your note is a bit confusing

12.  When you get centered up in an object you can go to higher power eyepieces, line maybe 18 or 14.  At some point the planets will look worse with high power than they do with lower power. 

When it’s over you can say you saw something that won’t happen again for 800 years.  Pretty cool. 

13.  If all else fails just plop the mint down approximately north.  Turn it on and tell explorestars to goto Jupiter.   release the clutches and swing the thing around until you. Center the planets.  Then lock the clutches and press the T button and the sync button. Then use the LRDU buttons to keep the planets about centered.  It’s that easy really.  The planets are away to see with the naked eye and thus easy to get into the scope field of view without a lot of accuracy.

Wes



--
Wes, Southport NC
EXos2-GT PMC-8, iExos 100
ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS+wedge, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90, 60mm no-name guide scope ~ 260mm FL
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG, ZWO 290MM, D5300 astro modified
Nina, Bootcamped Mac Mini control computer, RDP to iMAC
110 amp hour lead acid deep discharge battery for field power
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Re: introductions from Florida

Wes Mcdonald
 

👍👍👍🤞
--
Wes, Southport NC
EXos2-GT PMC-8, iExos 100
ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS+wedge, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90, 60mm no-name guide scope ~ 260mm FL
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG, ZWO 290MM, D5300 astro modified
Nina, Bootcamped Mac Mini control computer, RDP to iMAC
110 amp hour lead acid deep discharge battery for field power
Electrical Engineer, Retired

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