Limited Sky View


Richard Kirsch <Kirsch41@...>
 

I have a limited view of the sky. Mainly I can view some SW, mainly W, NW and not enough north to view Polaris. I have an iEXOS-100 and use ExploreStars on my iPad. Can I do a two star alignment? If I can, I understand I will have a limited number of stars from which to chose. Any hints or ideas would be appreciated.

Sent from my pocket.


brian skinner
 

Hi Richard, I have the same problem. If you look on the Explorestars App opening (home) page you will be able to turn autoslew off. When you select 2 star alignment select catalogue it will then invite you to select the first alignment star of your choice. The stars are named and show you their constellations. Select your star, slew to it and when happy hit sync. Repeat for the second star, then your good to go.
Thankyou, Brian 

On Sat, 6 Apr 2019 18:09 Richard Kirsch <Kirsch41@... wrote:
I have a limited view of the sky.  Mainly I can view some SW, mainly W, NW and not enough north to view Polaris.  I have an iEXOS-100 and use ExploreStars on my iPad.  Can I do a two star alignment?  If I can, I understand I will have a limited number of stars from which to chose.  Any hints or ideas would be appreciated.

Sent from my pocket.



Richard Kirsch <Kirsch41@...>
 

Thanks, Brian.  I’ll not be able to try this for about two weeks.  Traveling just now.  I will give this a try when I return.

Richard

Sent from my pocket. 

On Apr 7, 2019, at 4:24 AM, brian skinner <brianjimskinner@...> wrote:

Hi Richard, I have the same problem. If you look on the Explorestars App opening (home) page you will be able to turn autoslew off. When you select 2 star alignment select catalogue it will then invite you to select the first alignment star of your choice. The stars are named and show you their constellations. Select your star, slew to it and when happy hit sync. Repeat for the second star, then your good to go.
Thankyou, Brian 

On Sat, 6 Apr 2019 18:09 Richard Kirsch <Kirsch41@... wrote:
I have a limited view of the sky.  Mainly I can view some SW, mainly W, NW and not enough north to view Polaris.  I have an iEXOS-100 and use ExploreStars on my iPad.  Can I do a two star alignment?  If I can, I understand I will have a limited number of stars from which to chose.  Any hints or ideas would be appreciated.

Sent from my pocket.



Richard Kirsch <Kirsch41@...>
 

Brian — one more question.  I’m assuming that, when using a two or three star alignment, I will not need to be polar aligned.  Correct?

Richard

Sent from my pocket. 

On Apr 7, 2019, at 8:07 AM, Richard Kirsch via Groups.Io <Kirsch41@...> wrote:

Thanks, Brian.  I’ll not be able to try this for about two weeks.  Traveling just now.  I will give this a try when I return.

Richard

Sent from my pocket. 

On Apr 7, 2019, at 4:24 AM, brian skinner <brianjimskinner@...> wrote:

Hi Richard, I have the same problem. If you look on the Explorestars App opening (home) page you will be able to turn autoslew off. When you select 2 star alignment select catalogue it will then invite you to select the first alignment star of your choice. The stars are named and show you their constellations. Select your star, slew to it and when happy hit sync. Repeat for the second star, then your good to go.
Thankyou, Brian 

On Sat, 6 Apr 2019 18:09 Richard Kirsch <Kirsch41@... wrote:
I have a limited view of the sky.  Mainly I can view some SW, mainly W, NW and not enough north to view Polaris.  I have an iEXOS-100 and use ExploreStars on my iPad.  Can I do a two star alignment?  If I can, I understand I will have a limited number of stars from which to chose.  Any hints or ideas would be appreciated.

Sent from my pocket.



Wes Mcdonald
 

Richard:

That is correct.  The mount need not be polar aligned before a 2-3 star alignment.  Several points.
1.  It's probably best to make an approximate polar alignment.  Figure out where north is and set the mount pretty close.  Also set the angle of the RA axis using the alt adjustment to your latitude.
2.  After the alignment, the mount will know pretty much how to point to objects.  But this is a software adaptation that is continually made while pointing.  Thus the mount RA axis is not actually aligned with the earth's axis.  The result is you will still experience some star field rotation over time as you observe.  This is only problematic if you are doing astrophotography, and then it may not be severe enough to hamper your efforts depending on your F#.  Very long exposures will however be affected.  

Wes.


--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Gord Farmer
 

While we are on the two,star alignment.
If I unlock the clutches and manually center the ota on a star of my choice hit sync and then lock the clutches after which I use the directional options to slew to the next star ( of my choice ) center and hit sync. Will this method suffice when using the catalogue?
Of course I would polar align first.



On Apr 7, 2019, at 10:00 AM, Wes Mcdonald <wesmcd6@...> wrote:

Richard:

That is correct.  The mount need not be polar aligned before a 2-3 star alignment.  Several points.
1.  It's probably best to make an approximate polar alignment.  Figure out where north is and set the mount pretty close.  Also set the angle of the RA axis using the alt adjustment to your latitude.
2.  After the alignment, the mount will know pretty much how to point to objects.  But this is a software adaptation that is continually made while pointing.  Thus the mount RA axis is not actually aligned with the earth's axis.  The result is you will still experience some star field rotation over time as you observe.  This is only problematic if you are doing astrophotography, and then it may not be severe enough to hamper your efforts depending on your F#.  Very long exposures will however be affected.  

Wes.


--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Wes Mcdonald
 

Give it a go and let us know.  Pretty sure each sync resets the motor counts so two syncs are not going to do it. Also if you release the clutches you are going to mess up the home position which will be reflected in all your go-to I believe....but maybe not.  Sync sets the present motor count to the Ra and Dec explorestars thinks it is at.  Note when the mount is parked it does not return to an RA/DEC rather it returns to motor count 0,0.  So on balance I don't know what will be the case.  I believe the home position will be different after your adjustment but the Ra Dec displayed in explorestars for the OTA will be 90 Dec and some sort of Ra which at the pole is important.  But don't know.

For grins I once tried to align the mount by going to a star and adjusting the az and alt bolts to center it.  Then did another go-to and used the Az alt bolt to refine.  Etc etc.  It never converged.  Tried lots of different star selection strategies.  I still think there is a pony in there somewhere but I haven't found it and probably won't try again for awhile.

If you are polar aligned there is no need to do anything else. In the local area around a sync the mount goto performance will be improved. For example say you wanted to see a dim deep space object. Pick a star nearby and go-to it.  Then center using the LRUD buttons and sync. Then go-to the nearby dim object.  Should be right on.  

Let us know what happens

Wes



--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


brian skinner
 

Hi Richard, as Wes has said as long as the mount is level and pointing magnetic North your good to go. I find the subsequent tracking for shortish exposure photos are fine. If you want to do serious deep space photography you will need an auto guider camera probably.
Kind regards, Brian 

On Sun, 7 Apr 2019 13:22 Richard Kirsch <Kirsch41@... wrote:
Brian — one more question.  I’m assuming that, when using a two or three star alignment, I will not need to be polar aligned.  Correct?

Richard

Sent from my pocket. 

On Apr 7, 2019, at 8:07 AM, Richard Kirsch via Groups.Io <Kirsch41@...> wrote:

Thanks, Brian.  I’ll not be able to try this for about two weeks.  Traveling just now.  I will give this a try when I return.

Richard

Sent from my pocket. 

On Apr 7, 2019, at 4:24 AM, brian skinner <brianjimskinner@...> wrote:

Hi Richard, I have the same problem. If you look on the Explorestars App opening (home) page you will be able to turn autoslew off. When you select 2 star alignment select catalogue it will then invite you to select the first alignment star of your choice. The stars are named and show you their constellations. Select your star, slew to it and when happy hit sync. Repeat for the second star, then your good to go.
Thankyou, Brian 

On Sat, 6 Apr 2019 18:09 Richard Kirsch <Kirsch41@... wrote:
I have a limited view of the sky.  Mainly I can view some SW, mainly W, NW and not enough north to view Polaris.  I have an iEXOS-100 and use ExploreStars on my iPad.  Can I do a two star alignment?  If I can, I understand I will have a limited number of stars from which to chose.  Any hints or ideas would be appreciated.

Sent from my pocket.



brian skinner
 

Hi Gord, not sure about this perhaps Jerry can help?
Kind regards, Brian 

On Sun, 7 Apr 2019 16:06 Gord Farmer <gordfarmer@... wrote:
While we are on the two,star alignment.
If I unlock the clutches and manually center the ota on a star of my choice hit sync and then lock the clutches after which I use the directional options to slew to the next star ( of my choice ) center and hit sync. Will this method suffice when using the catalogue?
Of course I would polar align first.



On Apr 7, 2019, at 10:00 AM, Wes Mcdonald <wesmcd6@...> wrote:

Richard:

That is correct.  The mount need not be polar aligned before a 2-3 star alignment.  Several points.
1.  It's probably best to make an approximate polar alignment.  Figure out where north is and set the mount pretty close.  Also set the angle of the RA axis using the alt adjustment to your latitude.
2.  After the alignment, the mount will know pretty much how to point to objects.  But this is a software adaptation that is continually made while pointing.  Thus the mount RA axis is not actually aligned with the earth's axis.  The result is you will still experience some star field rotation over time as you observe.  This is only problematic if you are doing astrophotography, and then it may not be severe enough to hamper your efforts depending on your F#.  Very long exposures will however be affected.  

Wes.


--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Wes Mcdonald
 

Richard:

I would only amend Brian's remark as follows.  One should try to point at TRUE north.  This will be deviated from magnetic north by some number of degrees.  Around here it is 10 degrees.  Ordinarily your phone compass will have a setting for True or Magnetic.  Just set it to True.  The app knows your location and the deviation and will correct things for you.

There are two apps I would suggest you get for your phone.  One is PSAlign.  This thing is a swiss army knife.  But the best thing is it has an alignment aid.  It provides a cross-hair which you center a spot indicative of the north celestial pole.  The phone needs to be placed flat on the top of the telescope tube and when you have the az-alt just right the spot will be centered on the cross-hair (place tube in home position).  You will be danged near polar aligned...and no need to see Polaris.  You can do this in the daytime.  

The other app is SkySafari.  It is a fantastic planetarium program that has a virtual reality feature.  It shows you the sky as you hold it in front of you and turn around.  This is the high tech version of a planisphere.  It will show you basically every star and nebula and deep sky object you can and can't see.  Get it.  It will help you plan your  viewing and especially the alignment stars you are going to be able to use.

Wes.
 

--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Richard Kirsch <Kirsch41@...>
 

Wes,

Thank you for the reply.  I have SkySafari 6 Pro and love it.  Do you know if there are any plans to ever have PMC-8, iEXOS-100 to wirelessly connect with it?  That would be absolutely fantastic.  I will definitely look into PSAlign, especially if it will give a virtual polar alignment.  That would be perfect for my limited sky view situation.  I’ll be traveling for another week and one half but will give this a try when I get home some time after the 17th.

Richard

Sent from my pocket. 

On Apr 8, 2019, at 9:19 AM, Wes Mcdonald <wesmcd6@...> wrote:

Richard:

I would only amend Brian's remark as follows.  One should try to point at TRUE north.  This will be deviated from magnetic north by some number of degrees.  Around here it is 10 degrees.  Ordinarily your phone compass will have a setting for True or Magnetic.  Just set it to True.  The app knows your location and the deviation and will correct things for you.

There are two apps I would suggest you get for your phone.  One is PSAlign.  This thing is a swiss army knife.  But the best thing is it has an alignment aid.  It provides a cross-hair which you center a spot indicative of the north celestial pole.  The phone needs to be placed flat on the top of the telescope tube and when you have the az-alt just right the spot will be centered on the cross-hair (place tube in home position).  You will be danged near polar aligned...and no need to see Polaris.  You can do this in the daytime.  

The other app is SkySafari.  It is a fantastic planetarium program that has a virtual reality feature.  It shows you the sky as you hold it in front of you and turn around.  This is the high tech version of a planisphere.  It will show you basically every star and nebula and deep sky object you can and can't see.  Get it.  It will help you plan your  viewing and especially the alignment stars you are going to be able to use.

Wes.
 

--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Gord Farmer
 

Hi guys
 Just a question 
Would it be possible to have a way to attach a hand box to the PMC eight
Just as a back up



On Apr 8, 2019, at 6:08 PM, Richard Kirsch <Kirsch41@...> wrote:

Wes,

Thank you for the reply.  I have SkySafari 6 Pro and love it.  Do you know if there are any plans to ever have PMC-8, iEXOS-100 to wirelessly connect with it?  That would be absolutely fantastic.  I will definitely look into PSAlign, especially if it will give a virtual polar alignment.  That would be perfect for my limited sky view situation.  I’ll be traveling for another week and one half but will give this a try when I get home some time after the 17th.

Richard

Sent from my pocket. 

On Apr 8, 2019, at 9:19 AM, Wes Mcdonald <wesmcd6@...> wrote:

Richard:

I would only amend Brian's remark as follows.  One should try to point at TRUE north.  This will be deviated from magnetic north by some number of degrees.  Around here it is 10 degrees.  Ordinarily your phone compass will have a setting for True or Magnetic.  Just set it to True.  The app knows your location and the deviation and will correct things for you.

There are two apps I would suggest you get for your phone.  One is PSAlign.  This thing is a swiss army knife.  But the best thing is it has an alignment aid.  It provides a cross-hair which you center a spot indicative of the north celestial pole.  The phone needs to be placed flat on the top of the telescope tube and when you have the az-alt just right the spot will be centered on the cross-hair (place tube in home position).  You will be danged near polar aligned...and no need to see Polaris.  You can do this in the daytime.  

The other app is SkySafari.  It is a fantastic planetarium program that has a virtual reality feature.  It shows you the sky as you hold it in front of you and turn around.  This is the high tech version of a planisphere.  It will show you basically every star and nebula and deep sky object you can and can't see.  Get it.  It will help you plan your  viewing and especially the alignment stars you are going to be able to use.

Wes.
 

--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Wes Mcdonald
 

Richard:

I am working as we speak to see if the app called WiFiScope can successfully intermediate between SkySafari and the ASCOM driver via POTH.  For various reasons this would have to be a wired connection between a tablet running ascom etc to the PMC8 but a wireless connection between your phone (and SkySafari) and your mount.  So far works great with the POTH mount simulator but have hit a snag with the ASCOM driver I think.  Will let you know when/if this all gets sorted.

I have a few other ideas also that would make everything wireless...if that's an advantage, not sure it is.

Having way to much "fun" with this stuff...

Wes

--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Kent Marts- Explore Scientific Customer Service
 

There is no way to do it, nor are there any plans to do it.

 

The systems us completely different methods of communications and operations. They are incompatible.

 

Kent Marts

Customer Service

Explore Scientific

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gord Farmer via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, April 8, 2019 5:14 PM
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Limited Sky View

 

Hi guys

 Just a question 

Would it be possible to have a way to attach a hand box to the PMC eight

Just as a back up

 


On Apr 8, 2019, at 6:08 PM, Richard Kirsch <Kirsch41@...> wrote:

Wes,

 

Thank you for the reply.  I have SkySafari 6 Pro and love it.  Do you know if there are any plans to ever have PMC-8, iEXOS-100 to wirelessly connect with it?  That would be absolutely fantastic.  I will definitely look into PSAlign, especially if it will give a virtual polar alignment.  That would be perfect for my limited sky view situation.  I’ll be traveling for another week and one half but will give this a try when I get home some time after the 17th.

 

Richard

Sent from my pocket. 


On Apr 8, 2019, at 9:19 AM, Wes Mcdonald <wesmcd6@...> wrote:

Richard:

 

I would only amend Brian's remark as follows.  One should try to point at TRUE north.  This will be deviated from magnetic north by some number of degrees.  Around here it is 10 degrees.  Ordinarily your phone compass will have a setting for True or Magnetic.  Just set it to True.  The app knows your location and the deviation and will correct things for you.

 

There are two apps I would suggest you get for your phone.  One is PSAlign.  This thing is a swiss army knife.  But the best thing is it has an alignment aid.  It provides a cross-hair which you center a spot indicative of the north celestial pole.  The phone needs to be placed flat on the top of the telescope tube and when you have the az-alt just right the spot will be centered on the cross-hair (place tube in home position).  You will be danged near polar aligned...and no need to see Polaris.  You can do this in the daytime.  

 

The other app is SkySafari.  It is a fantastic planetarium program that has a virtual reality feature.  It shows you the sky as you hold it in front of you and turn around.  This is the high tech version of a planisphere.  It will show you basically every star and nebula and deep sky object you can and can't see.  Get it.  It will help you plan your  viewing and especially the alignment stars you are going to be able to use.

 

Wes.

 


--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Richard Kirsch <Kirsch41@...>
 

Wes,

Thanks again for the response.  I look forward to something that will work with iOS.  I purchased the iEXOS-100 specifically because I could control it wirelessly using my iPad.  I’ll keep watching progress.

Richard

Sent from my pocket. 

On Apr 8, 2019, at 6:13 PM, Wes Mcdonald <wesmcd6@...> wrote:

Richard:

I am working as we speak to see if the app called WiFiScope can successfully intermediate between SkySafari and the ASCOM driver via POTH.  For various reasons this would have to be a wired connection between a tablet running ascom etc to the PMC8 but a wireless connection between your phone (and SkySafari) and your mount.  So far works great with the POTH mount simulator but have hit a snag with the ASCOM driver I think.  Will let you know when/if this all gets sorted.

I have a few other ideas also that would make everything wireless...if that's an advantage, not sure it is.

Having way to much "fun" with this stuff...

Wes

--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


brian skinner
 

Hi chaps, true north is almost at magnetic North here so sorry to miss lead....
Kind regards, Brian 

On Mon, 8 Apr 2019 14:19 Wes Mcdonald <wesmcd6@... wrote:
Richard:

I would only amend Brian's remark as follows.  One should try to point at TRUE north.  This will be deviated from magnetic north by some number of degrees.  Around here it is 10 degrees.  Ordinarily your phone compass will have a setting for True or Magnetic.  Just set it to True.  The app knows your location and the deviation and will correct things for you.

There are two apps I would suggest you get for your phone.  One is PSAlign.  This thing is a swiss army knife.  But the best thing is it has an alignment aid.  It provides a cross-hair which you center a spot indicative of the north celestial pole.  The phone needs to be placed flat on the top of the telescope tube and when you have the az-alt just right the spot will be centered on the cross-hair (place tube in home position).  You will be danged near polar aligned...and no need to see Polaris.  You can do this in the daytime.  

The other app is SkySafari.  It is a fantastic planetarium program that has a virtual reality feature.  It shows you the sky as you hold it in front of you and turn around.  This is the high tech version of a planisphere.  It will show you basically every star and nebula and deep sky object you can and can't see.  Get it.  It will help you plan your  viewing and especially the alignment stars you are going to be able to use.

Wes.
 

--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


jrichard333 <jrichard333@hotmail.com>
 

Hello Richard and all,

I too have a very limited view of the sky towards the North and trees blocking my view towards the North West.  I am currently using the iEXOS-100 mount to do planetary imaging.  I setup around 3:30AM and start imaging around 4:15AM.  The stars I have selected for alignment are blocked by trees.  When planets start rising earlier, I will be able to do a 2 or 3-star alignment.

The most critical thing I have discovered is accurately having your mount pointed North. 

Might I suggest the following android apps:
1.  SkySafari- detailed  information on stars including visibility
2.  Star Odysey- being able to sort stars by magnitude or distance.

You can use those apps to collect star data.  You can also create an excel spreadsheet to document the stars in your area and availability.


brian skinner
 

Hi chaps, with my limited sky view I am finding that my OTA ends up consistently slewing to around 15 degrees to the right of my selected alignment stars. The end of slew position means my target stars are outside the field of view of my finderscope. This results in a fair amount of final adjustment in order to centre the stars.
My mount when parked is pointing true north, level and so on and tracks fine. I am wondering whether it would help to start alignment with Polaris centred in my finder scope and not be quite so worried whether the mount is pointing North? In other words does the park position assume the OTA/mount is pointing north or at Polaris???
Your expert thoughts as always would be very much appreciated.
Kind regards, Brian 

On Tue, 9 Apr 2019 08:33 brian skinner via Groups.Io <brianjimskinner=gmail.com@groups.io wrote:
Hi chaps, true north is almost at magnetic North here so sorry to miss lead....
Kind regards, Brian 

On Mon, 8 Apr 2019 14:19 Wes Mcdonald <wesmcd6@... wrote:
Richard:

I would only amend Brian's remark as follows.  One should try to point at TRUE north.  This will be deviated from magnetic north by some number of degrees.  Around here it is 10 degrees.  Ordinarily your phone compass will have a setting for True or Magnetic.  Just set it to True.  The app knows your location and the deviation and will correct things for you.

There are two apps I would suggest you get for your phone.  One is PSAlign.  This thing is a swiss army knife.  But the best thing is it has an alignment aid.  It provides a cross-hair which you center a spot indicative of the north celestial pole.  The phone needs to be placed flat on the top of the telescope tube and when you have the az-alt just right the spot will be centered on the cross-hair (place tube in home position).  You will be danged near polar aligned...and no need to see Polaris.  You can do this in the daytime.  

The other app is SkySafari.  It is a fantastic planetarium program that has a virtual reality feature.  It shows you the sky as you hold it in front of you and turn around.  This is the high tech version of a planisphere.  It will show you basically every star and nebula and deep sky object you can and can't see.  Get it.  It will help you plan your  viewing and especially the alignment stars you are going to be able to use.

Wes.
 

--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Wes Mcdonald
 

Brian:

The software assumes you have the scope sitting at the North Celestial Pole (NCP), that is true north when you start the PMC8.  PArk is thus at the NCP.  

If you are 15 degrees off, that is a lot of error.  If you can see polaris and setup to point to it when in park you should not be that very far away with gotos.  The error you have suggests you are not very well polar aligned, you are terribly out of level, or perhaps the wrong mount is selected in Explorestars.  If you were running it as a G11, then the motor counts would be wacked by 11%.. this could be about 15 degrees depending upon where you were looking.  My explorestars cam by default set as a G11.  Maybe yours is too?

Other issues come to mind but given that the mount returns to park those don't stand up to inspection.  

Check and make sure your mount type i correct.

Wes.


--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Robert Parks
 

Brian:

I had that problem as well at first; then I realized that my dovetail mounting plate affixed to my telescope needed adjusting so that the telescope was aligned with the axis of the mount.  Went out to a place where I had a good view of a tall radio tower (during daylight hours), set the mount axes in their parked positions and locked them, and used the latitude and longitude adjustments on the mount to get the polar finder crosshair centered on the light on top of the tower.  A crosshair eyepiece REALLY helps this process - it was suprising how misaligned my telescope was with the mount.  By adjusting the mounting plate, I got it where the scope and mount were pointing at the same place and voila!

Scott

On Fri, Apr 12, 2019 at 8:22 AM Wes Mcdonald <wesmcd6@...> wrote:
Brian:

The software assumes you have the scope sitting at the North Celestial Pole (NCP), that is true north when you start the PMC8.  PArk is thus at the NCP.  

If you are 15 degrees off, that is a lot of error.  If you can see polaris and setup to point to it when in park you should not be that very far away with gotos.  The error you have suggests you are not very well polar aligned, you are terribly out of level, or perhaps the wrong mount is selected in Explorestars.  If you were running it as a G11, then the motor counts would be wacked by 11%.. this could be about 15 degrees depending upon where you were looking.  My explorestars cam by default set as a G11.  Maybe yours is too?

Other issues come to mind but given that the mount returns to park those don't stand up to inspection.  

Check and make sure your mount type i correct.

Wes.


--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


--
Robert Scott Parks - Northwest Arkansas, USA

Mount: Explore Scientific EXOS II GT WITH PMC-8
Polar Finder: EXOS II integrated with illuminated reticle
Telescope: Explore Scientific 127mm f/7.5 FCD1 Air-Spaced Triplet ED APO Refractor
Finder: Telrad
Hardware: Samsung Galaxy Tab A 7"
Steering Software: ExploreStars App