Limited Sky View


Wes Mcdonald
 

Richard:

One other trick you can do.  Complete a 2 star alignment.  Then park the mount.  Note the Alt, Az, RA, DEC.  Now reset alignment leaving the mount parked.  Note the new Alt, Az, RA, DEC.  The difference between the numbers with the alignment and without is the alignment error you had mechanically.  

You also asked if the three star would help with accuracy.  It depends.  If your camera/telescope boresight is parallel to the RA axis (zero cone error) you pretty much don't need the third star.  If you are using a vixen mount my guess is you will be ok, but it depends on your camera/telescope mounting.  Probably if a telescope you should be fine with 2.

You cannot just plop the mount down, find a star and get it to track.  You must be polar aligned for the scope to know how the star is moving relative to the mount axes of rotation.  This is done either with a very good mechanical polar alignment (difficult to achieve with the iEXOS100 without something like Sharpcap or a Polemaster or drift method -- but the first two require you to see polaris I think.

Also as for PSAlignPro, the bubble level gives you inclination also, as well as a compass heading (true) and tilt.  Really this should work ok.  If you are concerned about the heading being influenced by the mount metal (only ferrous metal will change things) you can place it on the ground or on a jig such as has been posted on the forum --by Gord I think.

Wes.




--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Wes Mcdonald
 

Richard

The scales on the sides of mounts are almost always off by too many degrees to be better than a rough ballpark.  Can't say what yours might be but it's best to not use them.

I bought a digital level called a hammerhead from Amazon.  It works very well.  Also I have found that inclination apps on the phone work well too...those apps being correct means the psalignpro alt should also be good. 

Wes

--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Richard Kirsch <Kirsch41@...>
 

Wes,

I’ve used that but mine seems to have an incorrect “Alt”.  I’ll check it again against the gradation on the side of the mount.

Thanks again,

Richard

Sent from my pocket. 

On Apr 25, 2019, at 12:41 PM, Wes Mcdonald <wesmcd6@...> wrote:

Richard:

Are you using the PSAlignPro screen as shown below?  Virtual cross hair.  I find it to be pretty good in altitude.

If you use a compass to align be sure to adjust for magnetic deviation, and get it in the correct direction!

Wes.


--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired
<psalignpro.jpg>


Wes Mcdonald
 

Richard:

Are you using the PSAlignPro screen as shown below?  Virtual cross hair.  I find it to be pretty good in altitude.

If you use a compass to align be sure to adjust for magnetic deviation, and get it in the correct direction!

Wes.


--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Richard Kirsch <Kirsch41@...>
 

Wes,

Thanks for this help.  Last night, for the first time I was “semi-successful”.  First, however, I tried a dry run during the day.  I used stars to align that were there but not visible.  Then I slewed to the Sun.  Obviously I kept all the lens caps on but did note that, for over 1/2 hour, the shadow of my scope held constant.

Next, I tried last night and, you are right, I cannot chose a star for alignment via the catalogue.  So, I just kept pressing “Next” until a star came up that I could see — Sirius.  Pressed the “Slew To” and it went to a reasonable proximity.  Was neither in the finder scope or eyepiece (25mm Plossl).  Moving the scope around a bit, I found it and pressed “Sync”, then went on to the next star, Betelgeuse.  This time it was in both the finder scope and eyepiece.  Centered it and played around some more.  I was not able to find any nebulae that I wanted to image but I finally found Regulus and got a fairly decent image of it.

I know it’s a learning curve.  I a bit happier now than I was yesterday.  One thing I discovered.  Using a compass on iPhone for Polar Align is not the best.  I use PS Align Pro.  It tells me one thing for the “Alt”.  My setting should be 43.04.  However, if I use this setting for PS Align it is way off.  I set the “Alt” with the gradient on the side of the mount for my “Sun test” and for my venture last night.  That seems to be far more accurate.  However, I don’t have anything else to go by for “Az” setting except the compass on my iPhone, part of PS Align Pro.  I also do not have any way to view Polaris.  I really don’t want to get into “Drift Alignment” if I don’t have to.

Would three star alignment help for better accuracy?  Is it possible for the to start our with a selection from the Catalogue and just slew to it, then press “Track”?  Still sticking with it, for now.  Last night helped a lot.  Thanks for the help and hints.

Richard

Sent from my pocket. 

On Apr 25, 2019, at 7:41 AM, Wes Mcdonald <wesmcd6@...> wrote:

Richard:

The app allows you and wants you to do a 2 star alignment, especially if you cannot do a good Polar Alignment visually.  

I just ran an alignment on my Ipad.  What I found to my surprise is, at least for my version of the app, I cannot select a star for alignment via the catalog.  Rather I must use the NEXT and PREVIOUS buttons under the main screen star field image during 2 star alignment.  So what you would do is begin the alignment procedure with pre knowledge of what constellations you can see.  Then press NEXT until a star comes up as a selection that is visible to you, then press GOTO to go to it.  When the mount slews to it, center the star and press sync.  Then pick the second star using the same procedure as the first.

Perhaps this will get you going.  Try this inside to see how it works and to get acquainted with it all.

Wes.


Wes.

--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Wes Mcdonald
 

Richard:

The app allows you and wants you to do a 2 star alignment, especially if you cannot do a good Polar Alignment visually.  

I just ran an alignment on my Ipad.  What I found to my surprise is, at least for my version of the app, I cannot select a star for alignment via the catalog.  Rather I must use the NEXT and PREVIOUS buttons under the main screen star field image during 2 star alignment.  So what you would do is begin the alignment procedure with pre knowledge of what constellations you can see.  Then press NEXT until a star comes up as a selection that is visible to you, then press GOTO to go to it.  When the mount slews to it, center the star and press sync.  Then pick the second star using the same procedure as the first.

Perhaps this will get you going.  Try this inside to see how it works and to get acquainted with it all.

Wes.


Wes.

--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


brian skinner
 

Many thanks Jerry. It's rather pleasing (to I guess both of us) that, on this occasion at least, it is not something us new comers are doing!!!
Kind regards, Brian 

On Mon, 15 Apr 2019 16:17 Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific <jrh@... wrote:
On Mon, Apr 15, 2019 at 10:07 AM, brian skinner wrote:
The only problem now is that soon as I touch the paddle for again minor adjustment the sync button disappears so I am unable to accurately sync to this second star.
Hi Brian, Lloyd,

We have previously identified this issue and am working on an updated release. I will post a message when it is available.
 
--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


Lloyd Simons <simonsl23@...>
 

Thanks for the quick response Jerry.
Lloyd


Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering
 

On Mon, Apr 15, 2019 at 10:07 AM, brian skinner wrote:
The only problem now is that soon as I touch the paddle for again minor adjustment the sync button disappears so I am unable to accurately sync to this second star.
Hi Brian, Lloyd,

We have previously identified this issue and am working on an updated release. I will post a message when it is available.
 
--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


simonsl23@...
 

Thanks for posting this Brian. I observed the same behavior over the weekend. The 2 objects were off center by ~4-5 degrees (still working on my initial leveling/polar alignment. I am a GEM noob.). The first one would sync after manual adjustment but after adjusting to the second object the sync button would disappear.

Lloyd


From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> on behalf of brian skinner <brianjimskinner@...>
Sent: Monday, April 15, 2019 10:07 AM
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Limited Sky View
 
Hi chaps, another question if I may. Because of my limited sky view I disable auto slew. I manually select my first alignment star from the catalogue (after first selecting 2 star alignment). The mount slews to this first star and after some minor adjustments using the paddle I sync to this star, no problem so so far so good. When I then go back to the catalogue page and select my second star for alignment the mount slews fine. The only problem now is that soon as I touch the paddle for again minor adjustment the sync button disappears so I am unable to accurately sync to this second star. The sync button only stays on to when the slewing finishes unless I hit the paddle (or left right up and down buttons). I am therefore unable to accurately sync to my second star.....
I presume this something I am not doing correctly (as is usually the case!) so some advise here would be very welcome, as always.
Kind regards, Brian 

On Sun, 14 Apr 2019 00:55 shredderf16 <Shredderf16@... wrote:
Brian,
Could be your compass, but there are also areas of localized magnetic anomalies. In the US there are quite a few in Alaska and some of the Western states. One way to figure it out is that they are annotated on large scale aviation charts. You're right your mag var is supposed to be almost nil. Do you live next to an iron mine? Glad you figured it out.
Jerry Barth



Sent from my Sprint Samsung Galaxy S7.

-------- Original message --------
From: brian skinner <brianjimskinner@...>
Date: 4/13/19 4:38 PM (GMT-05:00)
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Limited Sky View

Wes, many thanks again. I think my time settings are fine but worth going through the subject to try and bottom out my 15 degree alignment accuracy problem.
For your interest I have just pointed my mount to polaris and ignored my compass. Guess what, assuming my compass is working properly, and Polaris is close to true north,  Polaris bears around 345 magnetic, meaning magnetic north at my location is 15 degrees or so east of true north....... My information is that for southern England true and magnetic North are very close. Not so seemingly!
 I would think this could go someway to explaining  my slewing accuracy problem.
Kind regards, Brian 

On Sat, 13 Apr 2019 20:59 Wes Mcdonald <wesmcd6@... wrote:
In summary here is how to set things, for Android:

1.  Find out your time zone now, east coast is GMT-4 in summer, GMT-5 in winter
2.  Set your time and date to automatic.

The tablet knows what is up, and so will Explorestars.  In winter the tablet will adjust you to GMT-5 which makes things correct after we fall back. Explorestars will sing along.  All Good.

I believe if you turn off automatic time then come fall back, after you set the clock, you need to move your time zone to GMT-5.  

But just use automatic.  It's so much easier.  Nothing to remember.

As for iOS, my phone works similarly to the way I described for android.  Just use automatic and all will be good.  My iPad also works that way.  it is easier in fact than android, you just tell it to automatically set the time zone.




Wes.




--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


brian skinner
 

Hi chaps, another question if I may. Because of my limited sky view I disable auto slew. I manually select my first alignment star from the catalogue (after first selecting 2 star alignment). The mount slews to this first star and after some minor adjustments using the paddle I sync to this star, no problem so so far so good. When I then go back to the catalogue page and select my second star for alignment the mount slews fine. The only problem now is that soon as I touch the paddle for again minor adjustment the sync button disappears so I am unable to accurately sync to this second star. The sync button only stays on to when the slewing finishes unless I hit the paddle (or left right up and down buttons). I am therefore unable to accurately sync to my second star.....
I presume this something I am not doing correctly (as is usually the case!) so some advise here would be very welcome, as always.
Kind regards, Brian 

On Sun, 14 Apr 2019 00:55 shredderf16 <Shredderf16@... wrote:
Brian,
Could be your compass, but there are also areas of localized magnetic anomalies. In the US there are quite a few in Alaska and some of the Western states. One way to figure it out is that they are annotated on large scale aviation charts. You're right your mag var is supposed to be almost nil. Do you live next to an iron mine? Glad you figured it out.
Jerry Barth



Sent from my Sprint Samsung Galaxy S7.

-------- Original message --------
From: brian skinner <brianjimskinner@...>
Date: 4/13/19 4:38 PM (GMT-05:00)
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Limited Sky View

Wes, many thanks again. I think my time settings are fine but worth going through the subject to try and bottom out my 15 degree alignment accuracy problem.
For your interest I have just pointed my mount to polaris and ignored my compass. Guess what, assuming my compass is working properly, and Polaris is close to true north,  Polaris bears around 345 magnetic, meaning magnetic north at my location is 15 degrees or so east of true north....... My information is that for southern England true and magnetic North are very close. Not so seemingly!
 I would think this could go someway to explaining  my slewing accuracy problem.
Kind regards, Brian 

On Sat, 13 Apr 2019 20:59 Wes Mcdonald <wesmcd6@... wrote:
In summary here is how to set things, for Android:

1.  Find out your time zone now, east coast is GMT-4 in summer, GMT-5 in winter
2.  Set your time and date to automatic.

The tablet knows what is up, and so will Explorestars.  In winter the tablet will adjust you to GMT-5 which makes things correct after we fall back. Explorestars will sing along.  All Good.

I believe if you turn off automatic time then come fall back, after you set the clock, you need to move your time zone to GMT-5.  

But just use automatic.  It's so much easier.  Nothing to remember.

As for iOS, my phone works similarly to the way I described for android.  Just use automatic and all will be good.  My iPad also works that way.  it is easier in fact than android, you just tell it to automatically set the time zone.




Wes.




--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


brian skinner
 

Hi Jerry and Wes, I agree my compass is possibly not calibrated or maybe the army has buried some old tanks nearby..... Whatever, I'll go with my 345 degree alignment to polaris and see what difference that makes. I'll report back....
Kind regards, Brian 

On Sun, 14 Apr 2019 00:55 shredderf16 <Shredderf16@... wrote:
Brian,
Could be your compass, but there are also areas of localized magnetic anomalies. In the US there are quite a few in Alaska and some of the Western states. One way to figure it out is that they are annotated on large scale aviation charts. You're right your mag var is supposed to be almost nil. Do you live next to an iron mine? Glad you figured it out.
Jerry Barth



Sent from my Sprint Samsung Galaxy S7.

-------- Original message --------
From: brian skinner <brianjimskinner@...>
Date: 4/13/19 4:38 PM (GMT-05:00)
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Limited Sky View

Wes, many thanks again. I think my time settings are fine but worth going through the subject to try and bottom out my 15 degree alignment accuracy problem.
For your interest I have just pointed my mount to polaris and ignored my compass. Guess what, assuming my compass is working properly, and Polaris is close to true north,  Polaris bears around 345 magnetic, meaning magnetic north at my location is 15 degrees or so east of true north....... My information is that for southern England true and magnetic North are very close. Not so seemingly!
 I would think this could go someway to explaining  my slewing accuracy problem.
Kind regards, Brian 

On Sat, 13 Apr 2019 20:59 Wes Mcdonald <wesmcd6@... wrote:
In summary here is how to set things, for Android:

1.  Find out your time zone now, east coast is GMT-4 in summer, GMT-5 in winter
2.  Set your time and date to automatic.

The tablet knows what is up, and so will Explorestars.  In winter the tablet will adjust you to GMT-5 which makes things correct after we fall back. Explorestars will sing along.  All Good.

I believe if you turn off automatic time then come fall back, after you set the clock, you need to move your time zone to GMT-5.  

But just use automatic.  It's so much easier.  Nothing to remember.

As for iOS, my phone works similarly to the way I described for android.  Just use automatic and all will be good.  My iPad also works that way.  it is easier in fact than android, you just tell it to automatically set the time zone.




Wes.




--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


shredderf16
 

Brian,
Could be your compass, but there are also areas of localized magnetic anomalies. In the US there are quite a few in Alaska and some of the Western states. One way to figure it out is that they are annotated on large scale aviation charts. You're right your mag var is supposed to be almost nil. Do you live next to an iron mine? Glad you figured it out.
Jerry Barth



Sent from my Sprint Samsung Galaxy S7.

-------- Original message --------
From: brian skinner <brianjimskinner@...>
Date: 4/13/19 4:38 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Limited Sky View

Wes, many thanks again. I think my time settings are fine but worth going through the subject to try and bottom out my 15 degree alignment accuracy problem.
For your interest I have just pointed my mount to polaris and ignored my compass. Guess what, assuming my compass is working properly, and Polaris is close to true north,  Polaris bears around 345 magnetic, meaning magnetic north at my location is 15 degrees or so east of true north....... My information is that for southern England true and magnetic North are very close. Not so seemingly!
 I would think this could go someway to explaining  my slewing accuracy problem.
Kind regards, Brian 

On Sat, 13 Apr 2019 20:59 Wes Mcdonald <wesmcd6@... wrote:
In summary here is how to set things, for Android:

1.  Find out your time zone now, east coast is GMT-4 in summer, GMT-5 in winter
2.  Set your time and date to automatic.

The tablet knows what is up, and so will Explorestars.  In winter the tablet will adjust you to GMT-5 which makes things correct after we fall back. Explorestars will sing along.  All Good.

I believe if you turn off automatic time then come fall back, after you set the clock, you need to move your time zone to GMT-5.  

But just use automatic.  It's so much easier.  Nothing to remember.

As for iOS, my phone works similarly to the way I described for android.  Just use automatic and all will be good.  My iPad also works that way.  it is easier in fact than android, you just tell it to automatically set the time zone.




Wes.




--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


brian skinner
 

Wes, many thanks again. I think my time settings are fine but worth going through the subject to try and bottom out my 15 degree alignment accuracy problem.
For your interest I have just pointed my mount to polaris and ignored my compass. Guess what, assuming my compass is working properly, and Polaris is close to true north,  Polaris bears around 345 magnetic, meaning magnetic north at my location is 15 degrees or so east of true north....... My information is that for southern England true and magnetic North are very close. Not so seemingly!
 I would think this could go someway to explaining  my slewing accuracy problem.
Kind regards, Brian 

On Sat, 13 Apr 2019 20:59 Wes Mcdonald <wesmcd6@... wrote:
In summary here is how to set things, for Android:

1.  Find out your time zone now, east coast is GMT-4 in summer, GMT-5 in winter
2.  Set your time and date to automatic.

The tablet knows what is up, and so will Explorestars.  In winter the tablet will adjust you to GMT-5 which makes things correct after we fall back. Explorestars will sing along.  All Good.

I believe if you turn off automatic time then come fall back, after you set the clock, you need to move your time zone to GMT-5.  

But just use automatic.  It's so much easier.  Nothing to remember.

As for iOS, my phone works similarly to the way I described for android.  Just use automatic and all will be good.  My iPad also works that way.  it is easier in fact than android, you just tell it to automatically set the time zone.




Wes.




--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Wes Mcdonald
 

In summary here is how to set things, for Android:

1.  Find out your time zone now, east coast is GMT-4 in summer, GMT-5 in winter
2.  Set your time and date to automatic.

The tablet knows what is up, and so will Explorestars.  In winter the tablet will adjust you to GMT-5 which makes things correct after we fall back. Explorestars will sing along.  All Good.

I believe if you turn off automatic time then come fall back, after you set the clock, you need to move your time zone to GMT-5.  

But just use automatic.  It's so much easier.  Nothing to remember.

As for iOS, my phone works similarly to the way I described for android.  Just use automatic and all will be good.  My iPad also works that way.  it is easier in fact than android, you just tell it to automatically set the time zone.




Wes.




--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering
 

On Sat, Apr 13, 2019 at 12:19 PM, Richard Kirsch wrote:
Am I missing something basic?
 Yes,  inherent in the time setting it is assumed that the computer user knows to set the correct time zone. If your tablet is not set to automatically set the time zone and use daylight savings time correctly then there is nothing that we can do in ExploreStars to correct that.
--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


brian skinner
 

Thanks Jerry. I believe both my indicated times being shown by the app are correct. My local time is UTC+1 (British Summer Time), my UTC offset is zero, being in the UK.
Kind regards, Brian 


On Sat, 13 Apr 2019 19:56 Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific <jrh@... wrote:
On Sat, Apr 13, 2019 at 02:35 PM, brian skinner wrote:
Hi Richard, I am with you on this. I would have thought the positional and time data from the tablet/PC would be all the app needs without any further adjustments......
Kind regards, Brian
I agree, and that is in fact the case. To say so otherwise is not correct. ExploreStars relies on the Latitude, Longitude, and Local Time (including the correct time zone) to be set correctly. How can it be otherwise as you insinuate?
 
--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering
 

On Sat, Apr 13, 2019 at 02:35 PM, brian skinner wrote:
Hi Richard, I am with you on this. I would have thought the positional and time data from the tablet/PC would be all the app needs without any further adjustments......
Kind regards, Brian
I agree, and that is in fact the case. To say so otherwise is not correct. ExploreStars relies on the Latitude, Longitude, and Local Time (including the correct time zone) to be set correctly. How can it be otherwise as you insinuate?
 
--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


brian skinner
 

Hi Richard, I am with you on this. I would have thought the positional and time data from the tablet/PC would be all the app needs without any further adjustments......
Kind regards, Brian 

On Sat, 13 Apr 2019 17:19 Richard Kirsch <Kirsch41@... wrote:
I’ve gotten totally lost in all of this.  I thought, just for the sake of clarification, all I need to do was connect my iPad via Wi-Fi to the mount via ExploreStars.  It, ExploreStars, would obtain the correct gps and local time from my iPad.  I would need to do nothing further to have accurate alignment.  Am I missing something basic?

Richard

Sent from my pocket. 

On Apr 13, 2019, at 12:09 PM, Wes Mcdonald <wesmcd6@...> wrote:

Jerry

HaHa  That is going to do everybody a world of good.

Let me ask in english.

1.  Time is set on tablet by me.  This is my local time.
2.  Lon is set by me or GPS on tablet, this is my site lon
3.  I set my time zone offset on the tablet to , in my case, GMT-4.  I leave it there for all time.
Now here is where I get goofed up.

4.  During summer I my local time is indeed GMT-4.  Explorestars displays my local time and GMT as different by 4 hours.  

5.  Winter comes and I fall back an hour.   My tablet switches its time one hour back, so now my tablet time is GMT-5.  So far so good.  

6.  What the heck happens in Explorestars?  I know Explorestars shows my local time difference from UTC is 5 hours. (example I set my tablet date to Dec 1 and read the explorestars screen).  Which is correct I guess given I am now in Daylight savings time.  So it knows DST is in effect, correct?

7.  So I assume things are working automatically, so long as I have my tablet set to the correct GMT offset.  

8.  So Brians problem is his GMT offset is zero he told me.  But his tablet has it at GMT+1.  So he is one hour off, correct?  He has told me he cannot change the offset so that is his problem, got to get past that.

Please tell me what about all this is incorrect?

Wes.


On Sat, Apr 13, 2019 at 11:45 AM Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific <jrh@...> wrote:
To be clear,  the ExploreStars app uses the UTC and then uses UTC provided by the PC calculated from the local time and timezone setting to calculate the Local Mean Sidereal Time (LMST). Here is the code used in ExploreStars:

        public static void GetTime()
        {
            double di;
            DateTime dateutc;
            string DateStrZ;
            string DateStr;
            //DateTime datej2000;
            TimeSpan j2000span;
            double LMSTtot;
            double LOC_Long;

            dateutc = DateTime.UtcNow;
            // Display the Date/Time
            DateStrZ = string.Format("{0:yyyy'-'MM'-'dd HH:mm:ssZ}", dateutc);
            DateStr = string.Format("{0:yyyy'-'MM'-'dd HH:mm:ss}", DateTime.Now);
            // Calculate LMST
            //DateTime dateutc = DateTime.UtcNow;
            DateTime datej2000 = new DateTime(2000, 1, 1, 12, 0, 0);
            //LOC_Long = -77.768;
            //j2000span = dateutc - datej2000;
            j2000span = dateutc - datej2000;
        #if false
            LMSTtot = 280.46061837 + (360.985647366286 * j2000span.TotalDays);      //GMST in dms
            di = 360 * Math.Floor(LMSTtot / 360);
            LMST = (LMSTtot - di) + (LOC_Long);
        #else
            LMSTtot = 0.77905727325 + (1.002737909350790 * j2000span.TotalDays);
            di = Math.Floor(LMSTtot);
            LMST = ((LMSTtot - di) * 360) + (LOC_Long);
        #endif
            if (LMST < 0)
                LMST = LMST + 360;
            else if (LMST > 360)
                LMST = LMST - 360;
        }
--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering
 

Hi Wes,

Yes, the time zone in the eastern USA is the Eastern Time Zone (ETZ). The value for EST (summer) is GMT-4, EDT  (winter) is GMT-5. ExploreStars only know what the computer tells it as far as time zone. It should work correctly (automatically also) if you have the correct time zone selected and if your region uses daylight savings time (DST), you check that box to automatically enable it.

So it appears that Brian does not have the automatic DST checked on his tablet. He would have to manually select the GMT+0 time zone versus the GMT+1 time zone currently selected.
--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!