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#astrophotography #goto #iexos-100 #astrophotography #polaralignment #iEXOS-100 #polaralignment #astrophotography #goto


brian skinner
 

Hi, I have now mastered my recently purchased ES iEXOS 100 polar scope. I've used it a couple of times now without any real difficulty. Last evening I managed a 600second exposure without any obvious trailing, without the polar scope around 120seconds was around my useable limit, so am well pleased.
One question I do have is wrt collimation. I have tried to collimate the polar scope using the three small cross head screws provided but found this basically impossible practically speaking. Thinking about it, provided I place polaris correctly in the reticule having previously aligned the reticule with either Ursa Major or Cass. Is collimation strictly necessary?
Thankyou, Brian


Wes Mcdonald
 

Why would you think not?

--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


brian skinner
 

Hi Wes, are you saying collimation is necessary? If so can you explain how this is done please? I have tried by loosening and tightening the three little crosshead screws but apart from some minor movement in a rather random direction, gave up after about an hour of trying. There was no way I was ever going to achieve the objective of ensuring a centralised target remained so when turning the left right iEXOS 100 movement through 180degrees......
I know you to be a very knowledgeable and clever fella, I hope you can enlighten me!
Many thanks Wes,

Brian


Wes Mcdonald
 

Brian

Hehe sorry I didn’t mean to offend you.  

Yes the polar scope must be collimated to the ra axis of the mount.  It is necessary for its line of sight to be a true indicator of the ra axis pointing...that is what you are trying to get pointing to the NCP.

I never could use a polar scope so I spent my out of the problem of polar alignment with a polemaster.   But if you want to use the polar scope you must get it collimated.  

The best way to learn how is to use google and find your self a video that you grok.  There are many.  This is a daytime procedure so you can get it done and not waste observation time.

Good luck.  If you get sick of it look into either an ipolar from ioptron or a polemaster.  If you care about polar alignment these will change your life for the better.

We’d

--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired