locked 2 Star Alignment frustration #alignment


Mario
 

Hi there, I'm new to the IEXOS 100 mount and hope I'm not repeating this question...

I'm finding it rather frustrating to complete the 2-star alignment process by aligning the scope by using the mount controls via the Explorestars app.
I have the app slew to the first star (Bootes/Arcturus), then look through the scope to see if Arcturus is in the field of view...then look down the barrel of the scope ...then look down at my laptop to try and slew the mount to get the star within the field of view....look back through the scope.....repeat these steps over and over until, with some luck Arcturus might actually appear within view.

I have already polar aligned...but I'm finding the whole star alignment process very frustraing.

Perhaps I'm just not following the right steps/procedure?

Thanks in advance, 

Mario


jrichard333 <jrichard333@hotmail.com>
 

Good day Mario,

 

I know many get frustrated; I used to be part of the IFCOAI (Internal Frustration Club of Astronomical Imagers).  Trust me, it does not help

to resolve your issues.  Time, patience, the ES Forum, and knowledge gained through experience will get you there.  Set small goals and you will get

there.

 

If you are ever wondering if this topic has been discussed before, you just need to the main page and do a search for your topic of interest.

https://espmc-eight.groups.io/g/MAIN/messages?msgnum=2755 .  Click on the search button and have at it.  There is a wealth of information

on the forum pages.

 

Some of the things I have done:

01.   Make sure my mount is leveled and pointing either North or South based on your geographical location. 

02.   If you can see Polaris, especially through the peephole, your eyes are better than mine.  ES does offer a polarscope attachment:

https://explorescientificusa.com/collections/polar-finders/products/exos-polar-finder-and-adapter

03.   If you don’t have a polar scope, you can always use SharpCap PRO.  This is what I started using.  I use nothing now, since tree leaves have

blocked my FOV to the North.  I have to come up with something repeatable before DSOs season starts.

04.   By any chance do you have a red dot finder?  This has a larger FOV then your finderscope, telescope, or guidescope.  For planetary

imaging, I use the red dot finder to get me real close and then I use the finderscope to bring the image into my FOV.  You should be

able to try the same with your setup.  Currently I am only imaging Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn.  They are pretty bright and can be seen in

my 8.5+ bortle skies.

 

I will not mention platesolving, which is really cool, because you will have to run your mount via a computer.   I use ExploreStars for planetary and

DSO imaging.  However, this upcoming season, I will use my computer.

 

JR

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io [mailto:MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io] On Behalf Of mario1546@...
Sent: Sunday, August 16, 2020 9:28 PM
To: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io
Subject: [ESPMC-Eight] 2 Star Alignment frustration #alignment

 

Hi there, I'm new to the IEXOS 100 mount and hope I'm not repeating this question...

I'm finding it rather frustrating to complete the 2-star alignment process by aligning the scope by using the mount controls via the Explorestars app.
I have the app slew to the first star (Bootes/Arcturus), then look through the scope to see if Arcturus is in the field of view...then look down the barrel of the scope ...then look down at my laptop to try and slew the mount to get the star within the field of view....look back through the scope.....repeat these steps over and over until, with some luck Arcturus might actually appear within view.

I have already polar aligned...but I'm finding the whole star alignment process very frustraing.

Perhaps I'm just not following the right steps/procedure?

Thanks in advance, 

Mario


Yorksman
 

"I have already polar aligned...but I'm finding the whole star alignment process very frustraing."

It does require patience yes but as with many other aspects of this hobby, the more you do it, the easier it gets. Practice makes perfect.

I may have this wrong but from your statement above, it sounds like you are wondering why, if you already have your mount aligned, why do you have to do this annoying star alignment? The reason for this is that polar alignment fixes the direction of your mount so that with longer exposures, the mount can track the DSO as moves in the sky. The telescope is very different from the mount and that too has be to aligned. The mount and the pole finder are fixed when you set it up but that doesn't mean the scope is, and that is moveable. The mount knows where it is looking, the scope doesn't, until you tell it. The scope needs some fixed points of reference in order for GOTO to work, the mount needs to be polar aligned for TRACKING to work.


Jed Fish
 

What I read from your note is that your telescope seems to be pointing in the right direction, but you just can’t get the alignment star into the scope’s field of view.  As JR pointed out, you’ll need a wider field.  

You don’t list your scope or which eyepiece you’re using, so we don’t know what your true field of view is (it seems clear you don’t have any type of finder) but in my experience the alignment stars can easily be 1/2 a degree off or more if you’ve manually set PA (e.g., got Polaris in the tunnel view).  You’ll also want to make sure the mount is in the home position when you power up.  

Use your longest focal length eyepiece and see if that helps.   If not, you’ll want to add a finder which, as JR points out, will give you an even wider field. There are many types, I happen to use a Rigel Quikfinder, it’s small, light, easy to install and align with your telescope, and easy to use.  If you can locate Polaris in your polar tunnel (seems many can’t) using a reflex finder such as the Rigel is very easy. 

Also, search these archives for Bob Hoskins’ (if I recall) notes on setting the home position of the mount. 

HTH
--
Jed Fish
ES ED102
iExos100


Mario
 


JR/Yorksman/Jed....thank you for your replies and words of encouragement...won't give up trying to get this right!
The learning curve is part of the challenge and sometimes the best part of the journey :)

@JR, thank you, I'll be doing a forum search from your link going forward. In the meantime, I'll leave this thread going so I can at least reply to you all.
@JR, I have done some astrophotography before so the mount is level and pointing towards Polaris. I aligned the scope to Polaris also and did a rough polar alignment by looking through the scope. My eyesight also isn't what is used to be - I also found the peephole tough to use.
I find polar aligning with the iPolar scope on my Skyguider to be quick, easy and really accurate so I thought the polar alignment process in SharpCap would be similar. However, for some reason SharpCap coudn't find any stars not matter which of my two CCD's I tried so I didn't get past step two.  Do I need the 'Pro' version to make the polar alignment work??

@Yorksman, I totally agree with your comment, the 2/3-star alignment is key to good tracking and didn't mean to imply otherwise. Just my frustration coming through. I've been waiting for my iExos 100 since May and I think my enthusiasm ran straight into my learning curve :)

@Jed, yes, after alot of wrestling with Explorestars and the mount, I can get the target star into the field of view in the main scope. Wrestling with Explorestars and the mount to get the target star in sight is the toughest part for me thus far.
Up/Down/Left/Right buttons on the Explorestars app move the mount/scope in unexpected directions and your eyes need to go between the eyepiece, the app and back again repeatedly. 

I was just wondering if:

a) I'm running through the correct physical 2/3 star alignment process and if everyone has experienced the same learning curve as I am
b) If there's a better way of 2/3-star aligning

Also, thanks for the suggestion to add scope/mount details, I've added a signature line below. Eyepieces are 20mm, K9MM, KE100. I'm not sure what the 'K' or 'E' stand for. You are correct, the 20mm is most helpful with the widest field of view

Lastly, to JR's point and suggestion, I'm just going to keep at it...I really want to make this work :)
This forum is awesome an I appreciate everyone's feedback!

Regards,

Mario

Mounts: iExos 100, Skyguider Pro
Scopes/Lenses: Main/Orion 80mm, DSLR/Tamron 18-400mm lens, guide/ZWO-340A
Eyepieces:  20mm, K9MM, KE100
Cameras: Canon T2i DSLR, ZWO120MM (guide)
Imagine Software: iPolar (for Skyguider polar alignment), iCap, Explorestars, Canon EOS Utility
Processing Software: Photoshop


Jed Fish
 

Well, in terms of the physical challenge of looking back and forth between the eyepiece and the UDLR arrows, you could try the little dot in the compass rose on the left side of the screen (that’s how it presents on the iPad anyway). Instead of moving your finger between arrows, you just put your finger on the dot once, then drag it the direction you want to go.  The speed is controlled by how far in a given direction you drag, no finger lifting needed so you can keep your eye at the eyepiece.  

As far as the unexpected movement of the mount, you’ll get used to it - it helped me to play with it for a while indoors so I knew which button caused the scope to move which direction on which axis.  For me, using a properly aligned reflex sight (like the Rigel) to lock onto the target star is pretty straightforward because I can see the whole area I’m targeting (both eyes open) and I know which way the mount will go.  Looking through the scope, you have a narrow(er) field of view and a reversed image, making searching harder and mount movement counterintuitive.   

Hang in there...

--
Jed Fish
ES ED102
iExos100


Mario
 

Thanks Jed....you're right, I think it's just going to take time to get use to controlling the mount via the app.

I think solid polar alignment will also help....getting that wrong or loose PA just makes things tougher as the evening goes along.
Part of problem last night I think was not getting through the SharpCap PA process because the CCD I was using for this purpose just was't displaying any stars in SharpCap.

I think I've fixed this problem (CCD was not focused properly). So that's my goal for tonight. Just polar align. 
To JR's point: small goals :)

I'll move on to 2-star alignment if time allows. I watched Jerry's video on configuring the ES app so that hopefully will help.
Your points around using a wider eyepiece also noted.

I couldn't find Bob Hoskins’ doc on tuning the mount - there's a link in the files section but leads to an empty directory. Weird.
If can there's a link I'd appreciate if someone could forward.

Regards,

Mario

Mounts: iExos 100, Skyguider Pro
Scopes/Lenses: Main/Orion 80mm, DSLR/Tamron 18-400mm lens, guide/ZWO-340A
Eyepieces:  20mm, K9MM, KE100
Cameras: Canon T2i DSLR, ZWO120MM (guide)
Imagine Software: iPolar (for Skyguider polar alignment), iCap, Explorestars, Canon EOS Utility
Processing Software: Photoshop


Jed Fish
 

The doc I was thinking about was by Wes McDonald on homing the mount:


The tuning notes from Bob Hoskins are here. They’re written for the Exos 2, so specifics are different from the iExos-100 but the principles are useful. 
 
 
Have fun!
--
Jed Fish
ES ED102
iExos100


Mario
 

Hi Jed, 

Thanks for this...much appreciated. I was looking under the Main files section rather than the Mount sub-group files section. Once I joined the sub-group your links lit up perfectly, thanks.

 I like Wes'  suggestion to use a Polemaster for PA. It seems a very similar process as with my Skyguider iPolar software which is quick and easy. Just follow the red arrow and put the crosshairs over the big red-dot. 

With that said, I was able to go through a complete polar alignment last night - but it was journey. I have the same guide camera and scope that JR does and initially mounted the camera to my main scope and was able to focus visually before using SharpCap Pro to go through it's PA process (yes, you do need to purchase the 'Pro' version - $20). It worked the first time around - but faded the second time around as I turned the weight arm to 90degrees per the Sharpcap process. It just couldn't resolve for some reason.

Instead, I tried moving the CCD camera to the guide scope instead....and wrestled with focusing the guide/camera combo. That took about 20 minutes but it's now locked in.
Once in focus, the Sharpcap PA process was quick and relatively painless.

So, goal accomplished for last night. Polar aligned!

I moved on to a 2-star alignment (this time with a relatively good PA) and ran into just figuring out how to move the scope into alignment using Explorestar controls.
I find this the most challenging part....I think it's just going to take time and patience to get use to the movement. This wasn't in any of the brochures :))
I'm gaining a new appreciation (and a little reverence) for guys that have the alignment process nailed down. It's kind of a skill that needs to be practiced.

Regards,

Mario














On Tue, Aug 18, 2020 at 11:43 AM Jed Fish <jed.fish@...> wrote:
The doc I was thinking about was by Wes McDonald on homing the mount:


The tuning notes from Bob Hoskins are here. They’re written for the Exos 2, so specifics are different from the iExos-100 but the principles are useful. 
 
 
Have fun!
--
Jed Fish
ES ED102
iExos100


--
Regards,

Mario

Mounts: iExos 100, Skyguider Pro
Scopes/Lenses: Main/Orion 80mm, DSLR/Tamron 18-400mm lens, guide/ZWO-340A
Eyepieces:  20mm, K9MM, KE100
Cameras: Canon T2i DSLR, ZWO120MM (guide)
Imagine Software: iPolar (for Skyguider polar alignment), iCap, Explorestars, Canon EOS Utility
Processing Software: Photoshop


Wes Mcdonald
 

Mario

If you have a good PA, you do not need to do a 2-3 star alignment.  Just do a goto, center the star and sync.  So the process is:

1.  Get your mount polar aligned.
2.  Put mount at polar home
3.  Boot the PMC8
4.  Connect PC to PMC8, Boot Explorestars
5.  Do a goto to a star near an object you want to look at, and center it, then press sync.  
6.  Goto the DSO.

Step 5 might not be needed if your mount is level, your PA excellent, and your polar home correct.

Wes.


--
Wes, Southport NC
EXos2-GT PMC-8, iExos 100
ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS+wedge, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90, 60mm no-name guide scope ~ 260mm FL
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG, ZWO 290MM, D5300 astro modified
Nina, Bootcamped Mac Mini control computer, RDP to iMAC
110 amp hour lead acid deep discharge battery for field power
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Mario
 

On Tue, Aug 18, 2020 at 02:30 PM, Wes Mcdonald wrote:
star near an object you want to look at, and center it, then press sync.  
Thanks Wes, that's a much easier process that the 2-star alignment (I was really struggling with moving the mount via Explorestars during the 2-star alignment...still need to master this)

With that said, I've read your doc on Polar home and will be working through that later today (I'm abbreviating your instructions so i can reference them later - happy to share this doc if you're interested)

Regarding step 5 in the process above....when I goto a star near a the DSO I want....how should that be done? Should I enter coordinates into the mount...or go to the DSO first then slew over to a near-by star?
I guess what I'm asking is: when I press 'sync' how does the iExos know what it's pointing at?


 
--
Regards,

Mario

Mounts: iExos 100, Skyguider Pro
Scopes/Lenses: Main/Orion 80mm, DSLR/Tamron 18-400mm lens, guide/ZWO-340A
Eyepieces:  20mm, K9MM, KE100
Cameras: Canon T2i DSLR, ZWO120MM (guide)
Imagine Software: iPolar (for Skyguider polar alignment), iCap, Explorestars, Canon EOS Utility
Processing Software: Photoshop


Wes Mcdonald
 

Mario:

So let's say the DSO is the Ring nebula.  It is in Lyra.  So go to Vega using the explorestars catalog.  You can search for Vega there, or you can flip through the bright star list with line drawings to find it.  Then do a goto to VEGA.  Since that is how you get there, the Explorestars "knows" you are pointing at Vega after you senter it.  You still have to use the Left, right, up , down arrows.  Set the speed to about 3 or 4 and you will be able to easily manage this.  When VEGA is centered, press sync.  Then do a goto to Ring Nebula.  That is also accomplished by going to the Messier catalog in Explorestars and finding the Ring (M57).  It will go right to it no sweat.

Wes.


--
Wes, Southport NC
EXos2-GT PMC-8, iExos 100
ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS+wedge, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90, 60mm no-name guide scope ~ 260mm FL
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG, ZWO 290MM, D5300 astro modified
Nina, Bootcamped Mac Mini control computer, RDP to iMAC
110 amp hour lead acid deep discharge battery for field power
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Mario
 

On Tue, Aug 18, 2020 at 03:58 PM, Wes Mcdonald wrote:
Southport NC
Awesome, thank you Wes! Looking forward to trying that out later tonight or tomorrow :)
Just curious, after following this process ....if I use the catalogue to 'goto' another object and centre it manually....will pressing the 'sync' button make the next 'goto' even more accurate?
 
Regards,

Mario
Streetsville, Ontario

Mounts: iExos 100, Skyguider Pro
Scopes/Lenses: Main/Orion 80mm, DSLR/Tamron 18-400mm lens, guide/ZWO-340A
Eyepieces:  20mm, K9MM, KE100
Cameras: Canon T2i DSLR, ZWO120MM (guide)
Imagine Software: iPolar (for Skyguider polar alignment), iCap, Explorestars, Canon EOS Utility
Processing Software: Photoshop


Wes Mcdonald
 

Mario:

Will subsequent SYNCs make things more accurate each time?  Yes and No.

Every time you sync you replace the old sync with a new one.  What you are doing each time is telling the explorestars that "these exact motor counts equate to these exact RA/DEC coordinates.  If there are alignment errors, level errors, and home errors, this exact correction only applies in a region around that place where you did the SYNC.

If you were perfect in your alignments etc, that one SYNC would set you up all over the sky.  Your goto performance would be right on.

So if you have a good setup, you will find that after your first sync things work pretty good everywhere.  I would always just give it a go directly to an object after that first sync if I thought I had a good PA, and a good level.  You will be pleasantly surprised to find the object where you want it each time.  But if it isn't there, just do a goto to a bright something nearby that you can definitely see and center, SYNC and then goto the thing you wanted to see.  

The better your PA and Level, the less you will have to resync to find your objects

Wes.


--
Wes, Southport NC
EXos2-GT PMC-8, iExos 100
ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS+wedge, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90, 60mm no-name guide scope ~ 260mm FL
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG, ZWO 290MM, D5300 astro modified
Nina, Bootcamped Mac Mini control computer, RDP to iMAC
110 amp hour lead acid deep discharge battery for field power
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Wade Prunty
 

I'd like to make a couple of suggestions here, one for Mario, and one for Jerry and the rest of the team writing the ExploreStars app.

Mario, I use the ASIAIR Pro with my iEXOS-100, and it performs an alignment (plate solving) process, utilizing my connected camera, to locate an object and then align on it. There is a 2-3 minute process that I have to follow when starting up the mount each night, but once that is complete I'm off to the races. You don't have to purchase an ASIAIR Pro to do this, I know APT has the potential to do it too, but the ease of use that the ASIAIR Pro provides is, as of yet, unmatched. I also use Kstars/Ekos, and absolutely love it, but the ASIAIR Pro's simplicity wins out when it comes to that ease of use. One thing though, you'd need a tablet device, like an iPad, to use their app.

Jerry and Team, I would suggest purchasing a couple of ASIAIR Pros and running them for a while, just to see how they perform, and to get familiar with the type of user experience (user interface) they provide. The app's ease of use, combined with the tools to do everything needed for a night of imaging including, goto, alignment, guiding, filter wheel control, focusing and camera control, is a real pleasure to work with. I think this type of user experience, along with Explore Scientific's quality and affordable pricing, would really grow the astronomy/astrophotography community.
--
Explore Scientific iEXOS-100
William Optics SpaceCat 51 APO
ZWO ASI1600MM Pro, ASI533MC Pro
Canon 5D, T3i (Both Astro Mods)
William Optics Uniguide
ZWO ASI120MM-S
ZWO ASIAIR Pro


Harry
 

Well said. An excellent idea!
--
Harry
Vero Beach, FL

Mounts: ES iExos 100-PMC Eight, ExploreStars iPad, Fire HD8
Scopes: ES  ED80CF, ES AR102,  Meade ETX 90 EC (Deforked)
Software: MacOS, Starry Sky Stacker, Affinity Photo, Lightroom,  SkySafari Plus
Cameras: Nikon D600, D5500
Misc: ES USB Power Bank, Rigel QuikFinder, 0.8x Focal Reducer, Filters:
 Optolong L-Pro, L-eNhance





Mario
 

Hi Wade, 

Funny you should say that...I have an ASIAir Pro that I was planning to use with the iExos :)
After seeing your note I watched a demo of the ASIAir PA process....very cool. I have clear skies this evening and will be trying it first thing.
(FYI....I run the ASIAir app via Bluestacks on my Windows 10 laptop. For me, it's a little easier than holding a tablet - I like the point-and-click of a mouse)

Jerry and Team, Wade has a very good point... as a really new user of the iExos and Explorestars, I'm still living the first-touch challenges.
Anything that can improve this experience as significantly as integrating an 'easy' PA process into Explorestars should be considered.
I say this first-hand as the PA user experience with the Skyguider Pro with iPolar installed is so very easy to use by comparison. I'm looking forward to using the ASIAir PA experience as additional comparison.

I'm also going to give the ASIAir goto features a shot. I started this thread due to my challenges with the 2-star alignment process and specifically with aligning the mount using the Explorestars app controls.
While I get that what we do involves a fair bit of technical expertise and know-how, improving this process would be a good way to opening up the user-base for the mount by improving this key feature.

Hope it's something that's considered going forward, 

Happy to volunteer as a beta-tester :)


Regards,

Mario
Streetsville, Ontario

Mounts: iExos 100, Skyguider Pro
Scopes/Lenses: Main/Orion 80mm, DSLR/Tamron 18-400mm lens, guide/ZWO-340A
Eyepieces:  20mm, K9MM, KE100
Cameras: Canon T2i DSLR, ZWO120MM (guide)
Imagine Software: iPolar (for Skyguider polar alignment), iCap, Explorestars, Canon EOS Utility
Processing Software: Photoshop


Mario
 

Hi again....wanted to just go through and show the user experience for iPolar on the Skyguider.
Made this video a few minutes ago...my first video posted to Youtube so hope this works: https://youtu.be/N4J6t6EY_tQ

I'm setting up the ASIAIRPro with the iExos now so I can try the PA experience with that platform/setup.
Wade can probably demonstrate this much better than I can but it might be fun to see my fumbling about with this first time out. Stay tuned :)

Regards,

Mario
Streetsville, Ontario

Mounts: iExos 100, Skyguider Pro
Scopes/Lenses: Main/Orion 80mm, DSLR/Tamron 18-400mm lens, guide/ZWO-340A
Eyepieces:  20mm, K9MM, KE100
Cameras: Canon T2i DSLR, ZWO120MM (guide)
Imagine Software: iPolar (for Skyguider polar alignment), iCap, Explorestars, Canon EOS Utility
Processing Software: Photoshop


Mario
 

Just finished the PA process with the AsiAir Pro and the iExos.
Full disclosure: I hooked everything up in about 20 minutes but could not figure out how to connect the mount to the AsiAir so this is a manual alignment. 
It should still give a good idea of the user interface that's possible within Explorestars and what the PA user experience might be like if this feature is added to the Explorestars app.
Compared to the Skyguider/iPolar video I posted earlier, this was a little slower, about 6-8 mins total with this being my first-time with PA process on the AsirAir.

Excuse the chaos and low volume...I was narrating quietly so as not to wake my neighbours :)

Link to the video (my second Youtube video ever - can you tell??  https://youtu.be/yKnWGte_5zM

Picture of AsiAir PA UI screen for review and consideration




Regards,

Mario
Streetsville, Ontario

Mounts: iExos 100, Skyguider Pro
Scopes/Lenses: Main/Orion 80mm, DSLR/Tamron 18-400mm lens, guide/ZWO-340A
Eyepieces:  20mm, K9MM, KE100
Cameras: Canon T2i DSLR, ZWO120MM (guide)
Imagine Software: iPolar (for Skyguider polar alignment), iCap, Explorestars, Canon EOS Utility
Processing Software: Photoshop


Wade Prunty
 

Mario,

I had to use the PMC-Eight configuration manager utility to enable the USB port on the side of my iEXOS-100, but that was a one time process. It's remained active ever since. From there I run a mini USB to USB A cable from the mount to the ASIAIR Pro. The ASIAIR Pro has the iEXOS-100 as one of it's mount choices within the setup screen, so once the USB port is enabled on the mount the ASIAIR Pro can connect to it and control things like slewing and guide correction. So, other than using th CMU once, months ago, the ASIAIR Pro app is the only thing I'm using to control everything.

There is a 2-3 minute process I have to do when I first boot up the mount. I just tell myself this is the calibration process and get it over with. And I don't really know how I figured out how to do these steps, I just fiddled around with it enough.
  1. Power on the mount and connect to it with the ASIAIR Pro app.
  2. Release both clutches and align the RA and DEC, so that the mount is pointing towards the NCP. (This will become the home position)
  3. In the app, under the telescope controls, tell it to GoTo Home Position. The RA will slew to a horizontal position.
  4. Release the clutch and move the mount back to the true home position (pointing at the NCP).
  5. Lock the clutch, and click Sync to Mount in the telescope control settings.
  6. Select a target and have the mount slew to it. It usually goes to the wrong place.
  7. Select GoTo Home Position again in the telescope controls. Again, it usually ends up in the wrong place.
  8. Release the clutch and move it to the home position.
  9. Click Sync to Mount one more time under telescope controls in the app.
  10. You're now ready to use the mount.
--
Explore Scientific iEXOS-100
William Optics SpaceCat 51 APO
ZWO ASI1600MM Pro, ASI533MC Pro
Canon 5D, T3i (Both Astro Mods)
William Optics Uniguide
ZWO ASI120MM-S
ZWO ASIAIR Pro