Topics

#iEXOS-100 What do I need to mount a DSLR directly to the iexos #iEXOS-100


Mehdi Tlili
 

I just bought an iexos-100 and can't wait for it to arrive. I am still looking around for a refractor in my price range and in the meanwhile, I want to start doing wide-field astrophotography using my EOS 1000D and the EF-50 mm lens. I couldn't really figure out what piece I need for mounting the camera directly to the equatorial mount. Any Amazon/eBay links would be helpful.
Thanks.


David
 

Just ordered this for my Sony a7iii from telescope house in UK. Should be here this week. It’s an ES product so will hopefully be a good fit. There are other cheaper options but I’d rather be safe than waste money on something that isn’t going to be a good and useful tool.
https://www.telescopehouse.com/explore-scientific-camera-dovetail-kit-for-iexos-100-mount.html


Stade
 

This is the one I got, from Explore Scientific and it works great.  I had problems with my dslr not securing tight enough and eventually realized it also has a spring loaded dowel you can move to sit underneath the dslr to help tighten/secure it to the dovetail

 https://explorescientificusa.com/products/camera-dovetail-plate 


David
 

You need a dovetail. I used the one mentioned by Stade (I believe is the same one that came bundled with my iexos 100 HD). Just be aware that if you use a longer, heavier lens it’s going to be hard or impossible to balance, so you might need a longer dovetail. 


Mark Hanley
 

Make sure the dovetail has a slot for a screw to attach to the tripod mount of the camera
--
Mark Hanley
Southwestern Pennsylvania

Mount:  ES iEXOS 100
Scope:  Meade 4500, Celestron Omni XLT 127
Camera:  Phillips SPC900NC, Canon  EOS 450D
Computer:  Nvidia Shield tablet, HP Pavilion Laptop
Software:  ExploreStars, Cartes du Ciel, Stellaruim, NINA, Phd2


Parag Modi
 

Ok, a complete noob question.  I just got my iEXOS-100 and bought a dovetail from Amazon.  When I mount my DSLR to that dovetail, how do I ensure that my camera is perfectly perpendicular to the dovetail?  I will be using Nikon D7200 mounted directly on iEXOS-100 with a 18-300 mm lens.


Ian Morison
 

Hi Parag,
    do you mean 'with the lens along the axis of the dovetail' as I suspect?   The answer is that it does not matter at all.  The lens could be pointing at any angle to the direction the mount is nominally pointing as it tracks across the sky.  In fact you could mount a ball and socket joint on the dovetail bar and point the camera in any direction you like.  The mount should, of course, be reasonably well aligned.
Cheers,

Ian M

On Sat, Oct 24, 2020 at 5:54 AM Parag Modi <pmodi@...> wrote:
Ok, a complete noob question.  I just got my iEXOS-100 and bought a dovetail from Amazon.  When I mount my DSLR to that dovetail, how do I ensure that my camera is perfectly perpendicular to the dovetail?  I will be using Nikon D7200 mounted directly on iEXOS-100 with a 18-300 mm lens.


Wes Mcdonald
 

Parag

As Ian stated the relative pointing of the camera is not important to the mount’s ability to provide you tracking along the path of stars. Alignment is however important for your mount to accurately point your camera at an object using the goto function.  

With the camera mounted and the mount in polar home position (weight bar vertical and dec pointing north, altitude set equal to your latitude) imagine the camera lens can be tilted up or down relative to the vixen bar.  This is called cone angle.   Now imagine the camera can also be twisted left (west) or right (East).  This is called dec home error.   These two errors will be reflected in your pointing.

If you are using a relatively short focal length lens ( about less than 300mm) you can probably not worry very much about these errors.   Your camera field of view will be larger than the errors if you use a little care when adjusting your camera mounting, and get it close by eye.

If you want to go longer focal length you might want to be closer than by eye.

The tilt of your camera can be measured with a digital level I think.  Remove the camera and measure the angle of the vixen bar.  Then install the camera and figure out how to measure the angle of the camera lens body. My guess is that if you have the camera mounted flat to the vixen and tightly screwed on with the  mounting bolt this should be close.

The twist is maybe a bit harder.   One way would be to get the mount aligned to polar home using a compass and your digital level.   Remove the camera and set the altitude of the vixen bar to your latitude.  Then use a digital compass to adjust your azimuth to true north.  You phone will have apps with both of these functions.   If you calibrate your compass it will work ok.  After that mount your camera.  At night adjust the camera mount left or right until Polaris is about in the center of the camera viewfinder.   That should do it.

Finally, before you do your alignment make sure the mount is level.  

With all this done you will find the system will point your camera very well and it will track objects so that you can take time exposures.

Wes

--
Wes, Southport NC
EXos2-GT PMC-8, iExos 100
ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS+wedge, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90, 60mm no-name guide scope ~ 260mm FL
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG, ZWO 290MM, D5300 astro modified
Nina, Bootcamped Mac Mini control computer, RDP to iMAC
110 amp hour lead acid deep discharge battery for field power
Electrical Engineer, Retired