Newbies request for help again


Jeff Hogan
 

We bought my son what I think is a pretty nice system.  Perhaps too nice as I haven’t been able to figure it out despite all the great online tutorials.

I’m ignorant enough that I may not even be able to state all that we have; but, it’s this system

 

https://explorescientificusa.com/products/es-iexos-100

 

 

So I know it’s the iexos-100 telescope an the pmc-8 mount and there was supposed to be something with it to help take photos.  

I have been unable to ever align this with Polaris.  I’ve been provided some great directions I’m sure; but, I can’t do it for a couple of reasons.

I live rural and have a cheap phone that doesn’t have a fancy compass on it.  I do have a military style compass…but, I get dyslexic with which North it should face. 

 

During the daytime I thought I had it all aligned with the scope looking at a distant tree top and was able to get the Moon on the scope; but, at night it’s just frustrating. 

I also don’t even know how to recognize Polaris without the telescope so I’m relying heavily on the directions to be accurate. 

I hate that we have a fairly decent system setting in our barn unused because I can’t ever figure out how to get it aligned.

I’ve downloaded SkyMap and even bought the pro version of Polar Finder Pro but, they all assume a level of competence I clearly lack (at least in regards to this field). 

Ask me about Psychology, Public Health, or medical simulation and I’ll probably bore you with facts.   But, I’m in over my head here and need help.

 

 

 

 

*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> On Behalf Of brian skinner via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 10:13 AM
To: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Android and Amazon Fire ExploreStars has been updated #ExploreScientific #ExploreStars

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 


-- Hi Jerry, an update regarding sqlite file. I have now managed to download and unzip the database including an old version (I assume) of the sqlite file, but this is dated 2019 and doesn't open the latest database under the ES App!
Brian Skinner
iEXOS100
Canon 1300d dslr
Various lenses
ES Polar scope
Sequator image stacker
PIXR image editor


Harry
 

Hi Jeff,

Welcome!! A little more info would be great and helpful. What telescope or camera are you using? How are you controlling or connecting to the iExos100 mount? Are you using the ExploreStars app and if so with what kind of device? IPad, Android, Windows? What kind of power source? Battery, portable power supply, house 110?

There are lots of great people here to get you going!

Harry
--
Harry
Vero Beach, FL

Mounts: ES iExos 100-PMC Eight
Scopes: ES  ED80CF, ES AR102,  Meade ETX 90 EC (Deforked)
Guide: ZWO 30mm Mini, ZWO ASI120MM-Mini
Software: ASIair Pro, iPad Pro, MacOS, Affinity Photo, SkySafari Plus
Cameras: Nikon D600, D5500 (UV/IR Mod)
Misc: ES USB Power Bank

Filters:  Optolong L-Pro, L-eNhance






Ian Morison
 

Hi Harry,
              Do you know your latitude and longitude?  If not, can you send your town and city so I can work out how much you need to offset from magnetic north.

There is a way  to set it up when you can next see the Moon at night.

Assuming that the mount is level and that the polar axis is set to your latitude,  slew to the Moon - probably nowhere near.  Now adjust the mount in Azimuth, that is rotate the equatorial head round to bring the Moon as near as you can using your lowest power eyepiece.  If you then look up along the polar axis, you may be able to spot Polaris.  Anyway restart the mount and slew to the Moon again.  It should be much closer. Again adjust the mount's position  (by rotation mostly, but perhaps some latitude adjustment) bring to bring the Moon closer still.  Try again and hopefully it will be in the field of view.  Now make sure that have something that is true north visible nearby from your mount's position - I have a mark on a fence -  but now it should be pretty obvious which star is Polaris for future setting up.

More help if needed.
Its a great little mount!

Cheers,
Ian



On Wednesday, March 10, 2021, Harry via groups.io <flykai1=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Jeff,

Welcome!! A little more info would be great and helpful. What telescope or camera are you using? How are you controlling or connecting to the iExos100 mount? Are you using the ExploreStars app and if so with what kind of device? IPad, Android, Windows? What kind of power source? Battery, portable power supply, house 110?

There are lots of great people here to get you going!

Harry
--
Harry
Vero Beach, FL

Mounts: ES iExos 100-PMC Eight
Scopes: ES  ED80CF, ES AR102,  Meade ETX 90 EC (Deforked)
Guide: ZWO 30mm Mini, ZWO ASI120MM-Mini
Software: ASIair Pro, iPad Pro, MacOS, Affinity Photo, SkySafari Plus
Cameras: Nikon D600, D5500 (UV/IR Mod)
Misc: ES USB Power Bank

Filters:  Optolong L-Pro, L-eNhance






Frank Rich
 

Hi Jeff, I too am a newbie and have the EXOSII, just ordered the EXOSI.  Below is my input


So I know it’s the iexos-100 telescope an the pmc-8 mount and there was supposed to be something with it to help take photos.  If you download the Explore stars database along with Explore stars Firmware, it will direct you  to a destination.  ( Isuggest viewing tutorials on You Tube as I did)

I have been unable to ever align this with Polaris.  I’ve been provided some great directions I’m sure; but, I can’t do it for a couple of reasons. For best results purchase Sharp Cap ($20/year), or QHY Polemaster.  You can also download Polar Scope Align in App Store or Google Play.  I personally use Sharp cap with success i never had before

I live rural and have a cheap phone that doesn’t have a fancy compass on it.  I do have a military style compass…but, I get dyslexic with which North it should face. I use my Phone compass, but have turned off magnetic North in Phone settings so it points at True North

 

During the daytime I thought I had it all aligned with the scope looking at a distant tree top and was able to get the Moon on the scope; but, at night it’s just frustrating. Your field of view is different thru the scope, again good polar align and the Explore Stars database will help.  By the way the only way I know to polar align during the day is with Polar Scope Align App

I also don’t even know how to recognize Polaris without the telescope so I’m relying heavily on the directions to be accurate. I use the trick of finding the two outward stars of the Big Dipper, continue a straight line thu these up till you see Polaris.  

I hate that we have a fairly decent system setting in our barn unused because I can’t ever figure out how to get it aligned. I too was frustrated, but many You Tube videos, plus the luxury of living near a member who frequently assists others on this forum helps.  These are just bumps in the road, you will get it, heck I could not even mount my scope correctly i the beginning

I’ve downloaded SkyMap and even bought the pro version of Polar Finder Pro but, they all assume a level of competence I clearly lack (at least in regards to this field). Try Stellarium on your computer to plan the nights viewing 

Ask me about Psychology, Public Health, or medical simulation and I’ll probably bore you with facts.   But, I’m in over my head here and need help.  Hang in There


If you care to contact me directly I can tell you about my learning curve


Frank

 

 

 

 

*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.ioOn Behalf Of brian skinner via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 10:13 AM
To: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Android and Amazon Fire ExploreStars has been updated #ExploreScientific #ExploreStars

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 


-- Hi Jerry, an update regarding sqlite file. I have now managed to download and unzip the database including an old version (I assume) of the sqlite file, but this is dated 2019 and doesn't open the latest database under the ES App!
Brian Skinner
iEXOS100
Canon 1300d dslr
Various lenses
ES Polar scope
Sequator image stacker
PIXR image editor


Jeff Hogan
 

Explorestars FirstLight


Yes.  Using the Explorestars app

Sent from my LG Phoenix 5, an AT&T 5G Evolution capable smartphone

On Mar 10, 2021 12:31 PM, "Harry via groups.io" <flykai1@...> wrote:
EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

Hi Jeff,

Welcome!! A little more info would be great and helpful. What telescope or camera are you using? How are you controlling or connecting to the iExos100 mount? Are you using the ExploreStars app and if so with what kind of device? IPad, Android, Windows? What kind of power source? Battery, portable power supply, house 110?

There are lots of great people here to get you going!

Harry
--
Harry
Vero Beach, FL

Mounts: ES iExos 100-PMC Eight
Scopes: ES  ED80CF, ES AR102,  Meade ETX 90 EC (Deforked)
Guide: ZWO 30mm Mini, ZWO ASI120MM-Mini
Software: ASIair Pro, iPad Pro, MacOS, Affinity Photo, SkySafari Plus
Cameras: Nikon D600, D5500 (UV/IR Mod)
Misc: ES USB Power Bank

Filters:  Optolong L-Pro, L-eNhance






Jeff Hogan
 

Battery and either samsung tablet or usually windows laptop


I have no issue with everything talking to each other if I tell the telescope that point to Polaris it starts moving and whirring but sometimes it's points straight up in the air.

It's the whole aligning to Polaris I just cannot figure out

Sent from my LG Phoenix 5, an AT&T 5G Evolution capable smartphone

On Mar 10, 2021 12:31 PM, "Harry via groups.io" <flykai1@...> wrote:
EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

Hi Jeff,

Welcome!! A little more info would be great and helpful. What telescope or camera are you using? How are you controlling or connecting to the iExos100 mount? Are you using the ExploreStars app and if so with what kind of device? IPad, Android, Windows? What kind of power source? Battery, portable power supply, house 110?

There are lots of great people here to get you going!

Harry
--
Harry
Vero Beach, FL

Mounts: ES iExos 100-PMC Eight
Scopes: ES  ED80CF, ES AR102,  Meade ETX 90 EC (Deforked)
Guide: ZWO 30mm Mini, ZWO ASI120MM-Mini
Software: ASIair Pro, iPad Pro, MacOS, Affinity Photo, SkySafari Plus
Cameras: Nikon D600, D5500 (UV/IR Mod)
Misc: ES USB Power Bank

Filters:  Optolong L-Pro, L-eNhance






Jeff Hogan
 

Thanks Ian,

 

Yes, I do have my latitude and longitude programmed into ExploreStars

 

 

 

 

The above is a screenshot (though it’s not connected at the moment).  When you are recommending that I adjust things are you meaning through the app or manually.

 

 

 

 

*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ian Morison via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 1:20 PM
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Newbies request for help again

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 

Hi Harry,

              Do you know your latitude and longitude?  If not, can you send your town and city so I can work out how much you need to offset from magnetic north.

 

There is a way  to set it up when you can next see the Moon at night.

 

Assuming that the mount is level and that the polar axis is set to your latitude,  slew to the Moon - probably nowhere near.  Now adjust the mount in Azimuth, that is rotate the equatorial head round to bring the Moon as near as you can using your lowest power eyepiece.  If you then look up along the polar axis, you may be able to spot Polaris.  Anyway restart the mount and slew to the Moon again.  It should be much closer. Again adjust the mount's position  (by rotation mostly, but perhaps some latitude adjustment) bring to bring the Moon closer still.  Try again and hopefully it will be in the field of view.  Now make sure that have something that is true north visible nearby from your mount's position - I have a mark on a fence -  but now it should be pretty obvious which star is Polaris for future setting up.

 

More help if needed.

Its a great little mount!

 

Cheers,

Ian

 

 


On Wednesday, March 10, 2021, Harry via groups.io <flykai1=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hi Jeff,

Welcome!! A little more info would be great and helpful. What telescope or camera are you using? How are you controlling or connecting to the iExos100 mount? Are you using the ExploreStars app and if so with what kind of device? IPad, Android, Windows? What kind of power source? Battery, portable power supply, house 110?

There are lots of great people here to get you going!

Harry
--
Harry
Vero Beach, FL

Mounts: ES iExos 100-PMC Eight
Scopes: ES  ED80CF, ES AR102,  Meade ETX 90 EC (Deforked)
Guide: ZWO 30mm Mini, ZWO ASI120MM-Mini
Software: ASIair Pro, iPad Pro, MacOS, Affinity Photo, SkySafari Plus
Cameras: Nikon D600, D5500 (UV/IR Mod)
Misc: ES USB Power Bank

Filters:  Optolong L-Pro, L-eNhance





Jeff Hogan
 

This in fact is the setup we have.  I sent an incorrect link earlier

 

https://explorescientificusa.com/collections/firstlight/products/firstlight-80mm-go-to-combo

 

 

 

 

 

*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: Jeff Hogan
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 4:02 PM
To: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Newbies request for help again

 

Explorestars FirstLight

 

 

Yes.  Using the Explorestars app

Sent from my LG Phoenix 5, an AT&T 5G Evolution capable smartphone

 

On Mar 10, 2021 12:31 PM, "Harry via groups.io" <flykai1@...> wrote:

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 

Hi Jeff,

Welcome!! A little more info would be great and helpful. What telescope or camera are you using? How are you controlling or connecting to the iExos100 mount? Are you using the ExploreStars app and if so with what kind of device? IPad, Android, Windows? What kind of power source? Battery, portable power supply, house 110?

There are lots of great people here to get you going!

Harry
--
Harry
Vero Beach, FL

Mounts: ES iExos 100-PMC Eight
Scopes: ES  ED80CF, ES AR102,  Meade ETX 90 EC (Deforked)
Guide: ZWO 30mm Mini, ZWO ASI120MM-Mini
Software: ASIair Pro, iPad Pro, MacOS, Affinity Photo, SkySafari Plus
Cameras: Nikon D600, D5500 (UV/IR Mod)
Misc: ES USB Power Bank

Filters:  Optolong L-Pro, L-eNhance





Jeff Hogan
 

I also either never got (or have lost) the smartphone camera adaptor.  And that’s something I never did find any instructions on how to use.  

 

I’m not even sure what it looks like; but, I am pretty sure it doesn’t exist if it is a separate component.

 

 

 

*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> On Behalf Of Frank Rich via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 1:34 PM
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Newbies request for help again

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 

Hi Jeff, I too am a newbie and have the EXOSII, just ordered the EXOSI.  Below is my input

 


So I know it’s the iexos-100 telescope an the pmc-8 mount and there was supposed to be something with it to help take photos.  If you download the Explore stars database along with Explore stars Firmware, it will direct you  to a destination.  ( Isuggest viewing tutorials on You Tube as I did)

I have been unable to ever align this with Polaris.  I’ve been provided some great directions I’m sure; but, I can’t do it for a couple of reasons. For best results purchase Sharp Cap ($20/year), or QHY Polemaster.  You can also download Polar Scope Align in App Store or Google Play.  I personally use Sharp cap with success i never had before

I live rural and have a cheap phone that doesn’t have a fancy compass on it.  I do have a military style compass…but, I get dyslexic with which North it should face. I use my Phone compass, but have turned off magnetic North in Phone settings so it points at True North

 

During the daytime I thought I had it all aligned with the scope looking at a distant tree top and was able to get the Moon on the scope; but, at night it’s just frustrating. Your field of view is different thru the scope, again good polar align and the Explore Stars database will help.  By the way the only way I know to polar align during the day is with Polar Scope Align App

I also don’t even know how to recognize Polaris without the telescope so I’m relying heavily on the directions to be accurate. I use the trick of finding the two outward stars of the Big Dipper, continue a straight line thu these up till you see Polaris.  

I hate that we have a fairly decent system setting in our barn unused because I can’t ever figure out how to get it aligned. I too was frustrated, but many You Tube videos, plus the luxury of living near a member who frequently assists others on this forum helps.  These are just bumps in the road, you will get it, heck I could not even mount my scope correctly i the beginning

I’ve downloaded SkyMap and even bought the pro version of Polar Finder Pro but, they all assume a level of competence I clearly lack (at least in regards to this field). Try Stellarium on your computer to plan the nights viewing 

Ask me about Psychology, Public Health, or medical simulation and I’ll probably bore you with facts.   But, I’m in over my head here and need help.  Hang in There

 

If you care to contact me directly I can tell you about my learning curve

 

Frank

 

 

 

 

*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.ioOn Behalf Of brian skinner via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 10:13 AM
To: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Android and Amazon Fire ExploreStars has been updated #ExploreScientific #ExploreStars

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 


-- Hi Jerry, an update regarding sqlite file. I have now managed to download and unzip the database including an old version (I assume) of the sqlite file, but this is dated 2019 and doesn't open the latest database under the ES App!
Brian Skinner
iEXOS100
Canon 1300d dslr
Various lenses
ES Polar scope
Sequator image stacker
PIXR image editor


Ian Morison
 

Hi Jeff,
     The latitude is to adjust the tilt of the polar axis.   Adjust to bring the pointer on the side (above the squiggly orange symbol) to the angle of your latitude  28 degrees.
I guess that you live off Paulette Street.   The attached image shows the difference between magnetic north and true north which will be 6.5 degrees to the right in angle to the direction given by your compass.   Put some tape down to the north of your mount along true north (ie just to the right of your compass direction) and then align the polar axis along this line.
Then, at night, you should be able to spot Polaris if you squint along the polar axis -  and may even be able to see it through the sighting hole.  If you can, you are well aligned for most things.  After dark slew to M42, the Orion nebula, it lies in the sword of Orion as seen in my pic.  I also append the Stellarium view towards the south southwest from your location after dark tonight.  This program is free so do download it!
If this doesn't work, the Moon will be around again soon.

I do hope this helps.
Cheers,
Ian


Jeff Hogan
 

Thanks Ian

 

I’ll see if I can follow this.

 

*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ian Morison via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 2:55 AM
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Newbies request for help again

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 

Hi Jeff,

     The latitude is to adjust the tilt of the polar axis.   Adjust to bring the pointer on the side (above the squiggly orange symbol) to the angle of your latitude  28 degrees.

I guess that you live off Paulette Street.   The attached image shows the difference between magnetic north and true north which will be 6.5 degrees to the right in angle to the direction given by your compass.   Put some tape down to the north of your mount along true north (ie just to the right of your compass direction) and then align the polar axis along this line.

Then, at night, you should be able to spot Polaris if you squint along the polar axis -  and may even be able to see it through the sighting hole.  If you can, you are well aligned for most things.  After dark slew to M42, the Orion nebula, it lies in the sword of Orion as seen in my pic.  I also append the Stellarium view towards the south southwest from your location after dark tonight.  This program is free so do download it!

If this doesn't work, the Moon will be around again soon.

 

I do hope this helps.

Cheers,

Ian


Andrew Houseman
 

You can get well within 1/2 degree during the day with a little app called 'Solar Polar Align'  and a cheap digital angle finder.

With no scope, set alt adjustment at 0, so the dovetail saddle is flat and put the phone on it where the scope would normally go. Solar Polar Align' computes the shadow angle of a vertical object, so you adjust the Az to make the shadow and line on phone match. It is much, much more accurate than a compass.

Then put the angle finder in the saddle and set the Alt to exactly where the angle finder matches your latitude. Now attach the scope.

Come nightfall, fine tune with SharpCap, but at least you will be starting out extremely close to true north.

Keep in minds, polaris is not exactly at the pole and there will be some cone error with the scope, so you may not actually see polaris through it, but the important thing is to align the mount to true north.

On Thu, Mar 11, 2021, 8:36 AM Jeff Hogan <jhogan1@...> wrote:

Thanks Ian

 

I’ll see if I can follow this.

 

*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ian Morison via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 2:55 AM
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Newbies request for help again

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 

Hi Jeff,

     The latitude is to adjust the tilt of the polar axis.   Adjust to bring the pointer on the side (above the squiggly orange symbol) to the angle of your latitude  28 degrees.

I guess that you live off Paulette Street.   The attached image shows the difference between magnetic north and true north which will be 6.5 degrees to the right in angle to the direction given by your compass.   Put some tape down to the north of your mount along true north (ie just to the right of your compass direction) and then align the polar axis along this line.

Then, at night, you should be able to spot Polaris if you squint along the polar axis -  and may even be able to see it through the sighting hole.  If you can, you are well aligned for most things.  After dark slew to M42, the Orion nebula, it lies in the sword of Orion as seen in my pic.  I also append the Stellarium view towards the south southwest from your location after dark tonight.  This program is free so do download it!

If this doesn't work, the Moon will be around again soon.

 

I do hope this helps.

Cheers,

Ian


shredderf16
 

Sky and Telescope had an article 2 months ago about using a plumb bob and string to make a sundial. At local noon the shadow points true north. Then use an angle finder app to transfer angle to mount. I couldn't find "Solar Polar Align" in the Google play store.
Jerry Barth



On March 11, 2021, at 2:49 PM, Andrew Houseman <andrew.e.houseman@...> wrote:


You can get well within 1/2 degree during the day with a little app called 'Solar Polar Align'  and a cheap digital angle finder.

With no scope, set alt adjustment at 0, so the dovetail saddle is flat and put the phone on it where the scope would normally go. Solar Polar Align' computes the shadow angle of a vertical object, so you adjust the Az to make the shadow and line on phone match. It is much, much more accurate than a compass.

Then put the angle finder in the saddle and set the Alt to exactly where the angle finder matches your latitude. Now attach the scope.

Come nightfall, fine tune with SharpCap, but at least you will be starting out extremely close to true north.

Keep in minds, polaris is not exactly at the pole and there will be some cone error with the scope, so you may not actually see polaris through it, but the important thing is to align the mount to true north.

On Thu, Mar 11, 2021, 8:36 AM Jeff Hogan <jhogan1@...> wrote:

Thanks Ian

 

I’ll see if I can follow this.

 

*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ian Morison via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 2:55 AM
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Newbies request for help again

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 

Hi Jeff,

     The latitude is to adjust the tilt of the polar axis.   Adjust to bring the pointer on the side (above the squiggly orange symbol) to the angle of your latitude  28 degrees.

I guess that you live off Paulette Street.   The attached image shows the difference between magnetic north and true north which will be 6.5 degrees to the right in angle to the direction given by your compass.   Put some tape down to the north of your mount along true north (ie just to the right of your compass direction) and then align the polar axis along this line.

Then, at night, you should be able to spot Polaris if you squint along the polar axis -  and may even be able to see it through the sighting hole.  If you can, you are well aligned for most things.  After dark slew to M42, the Orion nebula, it lies in the sword of Orion as seen in my pic.  I also append the Stellarium view towards the south southwest from your location after dark tonight.  This program is free so do download it!

If this doesn't work, the Moon will be around again soon.

 

I do hope this helps.

Cheers,

Ian


Frank Rich
 

I believe the gentleman is referring to polar scope align. You need the pro version to do daytime alignment 

Frank

On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 4:30 PM shredderf16 <Shredderf16@...> wrote:

Sky and Telescope had an article 2 months ago about using a plumb bob and string to make a sundial. At local noon the shadow points true north. Then use an angle finder app to transfer angle to mount. I couldn't find "Solar Polar Align" in the Google play store.
Jerry Barth



On March 11, 2021, at 2:49 PM, Andrew Houseman <andrew.e.houseman@...> wrote:


You can get well within 1/2 degree during the day with a little app called 'Solar Polar Align'  and a cheap digital angle finder.

With no scope, set alt adjustment at 0, so the dovetail saddle is flat and put the phone on it where the scope would normally go. Solar Polar Align' computes the shadow angle of a vertical object, so you adjust the Az to make the shadow and line on phone match. It is much, much more accurate than a compass.

Then put the angle finder in the saddle and set the Alt to exactly where the angle finder matches your latitude. Now attach the scope.

Come nightfall, fine tune with SharpCap, but at least you will be starting out extremely close to true north.

Keep in minds, polaris is not exactly at the pole and there will be some cone error with the scope, so you may not actually see polaris through it, but the important thing is to align the mount to true north.

On Thu, Mar 11, 2021, 8:36 AM Jeff Hogan <jhogan1@...> wrote:

Thanks Ian

 

I’ll see if I can follow this.

 

*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ian Morison via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 2:55 AM
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Newbies request for help again

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 

Hi Jeff,

     The latitude is to adjust the tilt of the polar axis.   Adjust to bring the pointer on the side (above the squiggly orange symbol) to the angle of your latitude  28 degrees.

I guess that you live off Paulette Street.   The attached image shows the difference between magnetic north and true north which will be 6.5 degrees to the right in angle to the direction given by your compass.   Put some tape down to the north of your mount along true north (ie just to the right of your compass direction) and then align the polar axis along this line.

Then, at night, you should be able to spot Polaris if you squint along the polar axis -  and may even be able to see it through the sighting hole.  If you can, you are well aligned for most things.  After dark slew to M42, the Orion nebula, it lies in the sword of Orion as seen in my pic.  I also append the Stellarium view towards the south southwest from your location after dark tonight.  This program is free so do download it!

If this doesn't work, the Moon will be around again soon.

 

I do hope this helps.

Cheers,

Ian


 

Jeff,

This picture is a bit fuzzy, but it looks to me like "Scope Type"  says "G11".    I don't use Explorestars, but if you have an iExos-100, I think it should be set to that - the mounts have different motor counts and gearing...

[Jerry - maybe change that label from "Scope Type" to "Mount Type" ?]


On Wed, Mar 10, 2021, at 18:29, Jeff Hogan wrote:

Thanks Ian,

 

Yes, I do have my latitude and longitude programmed into ExploreStars

 

 


 

 

The above is a screenshot (though it’s not connected at the moment).  When you are recommending that I adjust things are you meaning through the app or manually.

 

 

 

 

*****************
Jeff Hogan, M.S., M.P.S.
Allied Health Nursing IS Specialist
Associate Faculty/Digital Professor
Valencia College

1800 S Kirkman Road
Orlando, FL 32811

407-582-5564

 

From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ian Morison via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2021 1:20 PM
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Newbies request for help again

 

EXTERNAL EMAIL: Use caution when clicking links or attachments.

 

Hi Harry,

              Do you know your latitude and longitude?  If not, can you send your town and city so I can work out how much you need to offset from magnetic north.

 

There is a way  to set it up when you can next see the Moon at night.

 

Assuming that the mount is level and that the polar axis is set to your latitude,  slew to the Moon - probably nowhere near.  Now adjust the mount in Azimuth, that is rotate the equatorial head round to bring the Moon as near as you can using your lowest power eyepiece.  If you then look up along the polar axis, you may be able to spot Polaris.  Anyway restart the mount and slew to the Moon again.  It should be much closer. Again adjust the mount's position  (by rotation mostly, but perhaps some latitude adjustment) bring to bring the Moon closer still.  Try again and hopefully it will be in the field of view.  Now make sure that have something that is true north visible nearby from your mount's position - I have a mark on a fence -  but now it should be pretty obvious which star is Polaris for future setting up.

 

More help if needed.

Its a great little mount!

 

Cheers,

Ian

 

 


On Wednesday, March 10, 2021, Harry via groups.io <flykai1=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hi Jeff,

Welcome!! A little more info would be great and helpful. What telescope or camera are you using? How are you controlling or connecting to the iExos100 mount? Are you using the ExploreStars app and if so with what kind of device? IPad, Android, Windows? What kind of power source? Battery, portable power supply, house 110?

There are lots of great people here to get you going!

Harry
--
Harry
Vero Beach, FL

Mounts: ES iExos 100-PMC Eight
Scopes: ES  ED80CF, ES AR102,  Meade ETX 90 EC (Deforked)
Guide: ZWO 30mm Mini, ZWO ASI120MM-Mini
Software: ASIair Pro, iPad Pro, MacOS, Affinity Photo, SkySafari Plus
Cameras: Nikon D600, D5500 (UV/IR Mod)
Misc: ES USB Power Bank

Filters:  Optolong L-Pro, L-eNhance





Attachments:
  • image002.jpg


--
Mounts: ES PMC-8 EXOS2
Scopes: SV 102EDT, ZWO 60/280 Guide
Cameras:  Nikon D5300, Altair GPCAM2 290M
Software: ASCOM, CdC, AstroTortilla, BYN Pro, Sharpcap, PHD2
Computer:  Thinkpad x230, Win7Pro/64


James Ball
 

"I have no issue with everything talking to each other if I tell the telescope that point to Polaris it starts moving and whirring but sometimes it's points straight up in the air."

The scope needs to be pointed towards Polaris before you power on the mount, that is how it knows where it is.  By default the mount thinks it is pointed at Polaris when it boots up, and when the Explorestars App is turned on it will begin at Polaris.  Then you look through the scope and physically adjust the right left and up down to center Polaris in your scope.  (Polaris is not dead center of true north but it is close for beginning)

This is a screenshot of Stellarium showing Polaris (white dot near center) with the Celestial Pole at the center of the blue lines, that would be the exact point of Polar Alignment, you can use Stellarium to see where it is exactly in your location and current time.  Polaris will move around the Pole through the year from our point of view so using Polaris to align the scope you have to know where it is in relation to the Pole for each day and time.



Once you have it close, then you can do the two or three star alignment which will correct for any error you still have.  For best results pickup an eyepiece with an illuminated crosshair when doing the alignments.

As mentioned, Sharpcap Pro will do an even better job of getting the alignment correct but you will need an astro camera inserted in place of the eyepiece, or in a guide scope, I don't think that would work if using a smartphone.

I really enjoy my iEXOS-100 but it took me a lot of reading to figure out just how to set it up.  Good luck and keep asking questions, it is the best way to learn.
--
James Ball
Dawson Springs, Ky
Mounts: iEXOS-100
Scopes: Meade ETX90RA(deforked now) Sky Watcher 150MCT
Camera: ZWO ASI 120MC-S
Software: Explore Stars Android, ASCOM, Stellarium Scope, Stellarium, AS!3, SharpCap, RegiStax6.


Ian Morison
 

Hi Jeff,
   you can find when the Sun is due south using Stellarium.  Include the meridian line - under the Markings page accessed from the left hand vertical panel -  and expand the region around the Sun so that, by adjusting the time, you can see when the meridian line cuts across the Sun and the time will be when the Sun is due south.  At this time a shadow will point exactly true north.
Stellarium showed that today, the Sun will be due south at 17:35 UT.
Cheers,
Ian


Virus-free. www.avast.com


alandebrut
 

Hi Jeff,

Not heard if you have resolved your problem?

But for what is its worth you are not going to get anywhere if you can't visually find Polaris,
in very layman terms may I suggest that at mid day the sun will be south (at least it is in the UK) so turn around with the sun at your back, hopefully you can see your shadow directly in front of you, make a mental note on a fence or building in front of you that you can see at night time.

At night time find your point on the fence or building and look up in the sky and search for the Big Dipper using your IEXOS 100 manual, turn to page 19 and there is a simple diagram of the Big Dipper with Polaris,
you should be able to find it now and approximately where Polaris is.

To further assist in finding Polaris or any other stars don't look at any bright lights, in fact turn off any of your house lights if you can and spend quite a bit of time looking at the night sky, you will be surprised at how many stars you can actually see after your eyes have adjusted, on a clear night the Big Dipper is quite easy to see, follow the diagram to find Polaris, I should point out the Big Dipper moves around Polaris like a clock hand, the shape stays the same but it could be upside down.

There are many videos on Youtube that might assist as well.

I hope this gets you started but be warned this hobby is a massive learning curve to begin with.

Good luck
Alan
--
Warrington
UK

Explore Scientific:
Telescope AR102, F6.5
Exos 2, PMC8 
QHY PoleMaster
ZWO Electronic Auto-focuser
Altair 290C

Celestron SE8 plus mount
Starsense
Sharpcap Pro
CDC
Stellarium
APT
Firecapture

Canon 80D