locked Finding the north star


Vance LaSalle
 

Is there a new user  group that I can get a link to I'm? I'm a little challenged when locating the north star. I'm pretty sure that I can see the big dipper but not the little dipper to get Polaris..


Ian Morison
 

Hi Vance,
   the two bright stars at the right hand side of the big dipper, Merak and Dubhe act as pointers - just extend the line beyond Dubhe until you find a bright star.  That should be Polaris.
Download Stellarium (free) onto a computer to see where things are.
Cheers,
Ian

On Fri, Aug 20, 2021 at 4:44 PM Vance LaSalle <vancelasalle@...> wrote:
Is there a new user  group that I can get a link to I'm? I'm a little challenged when locating the north star. I'm pretty sure that I can see the big dipper but not the little dipper to get Polaris..


Vance LaSalle
 

Yep  I have Stellarium on my iPad, and star chart, however locating it is another story all together..





-------- Original message --------
From: Ian Morison <ian@...>
Date: 2021-08-20 11:56 a.m. (GMT-05:00)
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Finding the north star

Hi Vance,
   the two bright stars at the right hand side of the big dipper, Merak and Dubhe act as pointers - just extend the line beyond Dubhe until you find a bright star.  That should be Polaris.
Download Stellarium (free) onto a computer to see where things are.
Cheers,
Ian

On Fri, Aug 20, 2021 at 4:44 PM Vance LaSalle <vancelasalle@...> wrote:
Is there a new user  group that I can get a link to I'm? I'm a little challenged when locating the north star. I'm pretty sure that I can see the big dipper but not the little dipper to get Polaris..


Leigh Caldwell
 

Hi Vance

If you Google “finding Polaris” you will find  a series of images like this one:



Polaris is the only bright star you’ll see in that direction from Merak & Dubhe.

Or, if you can work out what direction is north, from a street map of your neighbourhood, just look north. Polaris will be roughly halfway between the northern horizon and the point directly above you (a bit higher if you’re in a northern latitude, lower if you’re further south).


On Fri, 20 Aug 2021 at 17:02, Vance LaSalle <vancelasalle@...> wrote:
Yep  I have Stellarium on my iPad, and star chart, however locating it is another story all together..





-------- Original message --------
From: Ian Morison <ian@...>
Date: 2021-08-20 11:56 a.m. (GMT-05:00)
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Finding the north star

Hi Vance,
   the two bright stars at the right hand side of the big dipper, Merak and Dubhe act as pointers - just extend the line beyond Dubhe until you find a bright star.  That should be Polaris.
Download Stellarium (free) onto a computer to see where things are.
Cheers,
Ian

On Fri, Aug 20, 2021 at 4:44 PM Vance LaSalle <vancelasalle@...> wrote:
Is there a new user  group that I can get a link to I'm? I'm a little challenged when locating the north star. I'm pretty sure that I can see the big dipper but not the little dipper to get Polaris..


Hildo <hildo79@...>
 

You don't really need to see the little dipper. If you can find the big dipper (should be in a position a little higher than the attached image) follow the line from the stars on the end (Marek and Dubhe) to Polaris. Polaris brighter then the stars surrounding it. 

A star app like Stellarium or skysafari also use your phones compass and will get you pretty close. 

Your latitude will also be close to how high Polaris is in the sky. So that will give you a general idea. Adjust your mount to what ever your latitude is and point it north. You will be In the ballpark 





-------- Original message --------
From: Vance LaSalle <vancelasalle@...>
Date: 2021-08-20 9:44 a.m. (GMT-07:00)
To: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io
Subject: [ESPMC-Eight] Finding the north star

Is there a new user  group that I can get a link to I'm? I'm a little challenged when locating the north star. I'm pretty sure that I can see the big dipper but not the little dipper to get Polaris..


Kim
 

You can also use your phone and the PS Align Pro app to get your scope reasonably close to pointing at the north star. There is a bracket that you can use to align your mount with this method. I don't recall off-hand how to find the link, but it is in here somewhere. You have to download the design and have it 3D printed, but it works well.
--
Kim T.
iEXOS 100 PMC-Eight
Sky-Watcher ProED 80
Sony SLT-A77V
Meade LPI-GM
Orion Deluxe OAG
Orion Deluxe Mini 50mm Guide Scope


Larry Young
 

Hi Vance,
    I recommend that you try a free astronomy program for your smart phone.  I use android so I use the apps for that platform.  My favorite is Skysafari, the free version let's you hold your phone up to the sky and shows you a skychart of what you're pointing at using your gps.  The other one I use all the time is Skyeye, I use it to do a rough polar alignment in daylight before dark.  That saves me time by getting the mount close enough so I can see Polaris through the finder right away as soon as stars are visible.
    As others said you don't have to see Polaris to align your mount.

Good viewing,

Larry
--
EXOS II PMC-8
Celestron 6SE
Dobstuff rebuild of Coulter 17 with Nexus2


Stan
 

Hi Vance and welcome to the forum.

It would be helpful to understand why you are challenged to find Polaris. Are you unfamiliar with the night sky? Is your view blocked? Are you under bright skies at night? You've already gotten great help in the previous messages, but since you asked for a link, I would recommend the Cloudy Nights forums. Just google the name and you will find them. They have several groups that address newbie questions and members are very helpful.

One last thing I will mention with respect to finding Polaris is to use the compass on your phone to find North, but remember that magnetic North, which is what your compass will point to, is different than true north by a few degrees, depending on your latitude.

--
Mounts: ES EXOS2 PMC-8
Scopes: Skywatcher Evostar 120ED
Cameras:  iPhone, Lumix LX-7, SvBony 305
Misc:
Software: ExploreStars (windows and iPad), ASCOM, Stellarium, PS Align Pro, SharpCap


Wes Mcdonald
 

Link to tray on thingverse


--
Wes, Southport NC
EXos2-GT PMC-8, iExos 100
ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS+wedge, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90, 60mm no-name guide scope ~ 260mm FL
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG, ZWO 290MM, D5300 astro modified
Nina, Bootcamped Mac Mini control computer, RDP to iMAC
110 amp hour lead acid deep discharge battery for field power
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering
 

Please continue this conversation by posting to the PMC-Eight Applications sub group.
--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!