Expected tracking times *Unguided #EXOS2 #TECHNICAL


JB1983
 

This was my manual M42 from a few months back.
147x1 second lights 
15 darks 

And my first time using DSS, photoshop and lightroom.  Used a wireless intervalometer.  Turned out pretty good I think.  For winging it anyways haha


Chris Tardif
 

Stellarium....it’s free so give it a go.  I tried it unsuccessfully and it left me immensely frustrated.  I found Stellarium itself to be rather unintuitive and you need a twitchy bit of code called “Stellarium-Scope” to make ASCOM talk to it.  I had no luck with it.  When I spoke with Steve at OTA where I bought the IEXOS-100 from he confirmed for me Stellarium-Scope was a steaming pile.

 

My first scope (Celestron XLT150) came with a  copy of Starry Night which I like a lot.  It interfaces with ASCOM well but does not talk to APT (Astro Photography Tool) which I shoot with.  If I were to look for a new planetarium software now I would look at Cart du Ciel which people seem to be happy with.

 

I would love to hear other opinions on this too because it’s becoming an issue for me.  I am trying to figure out plate-solving and integrating all this software.....which is more complex than the hardware 😊

 

 

Chris

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> on behalf of Robert Hoskin <devonshire@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 13, 2019 10:07:59 PM
To: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Expected tracking times *Unguided
 
JB & Wes,
 
My D5300 is on the hub as well.  It's been fine.  The only issue I had with the camera and USB was getting the right cable with the right length.  
 
Hubs, I just punted and took advice from CN (powered hub, never unpowered) + people seeming happy with the Ankers.  It's just worked.
 
- Bob
 
--
Mounts: ES PMC-8 EXOS2
Scopes: SV 102EDT, ZWO 60/280 Guide
Cameras:  Nikon D5300, Altair GPCAM2-IMX224C
Software: ASCOM, CdC, AstroTortilla, BYN Pro, Sharpcap, PHD2
Computer:  Thinkpad x230, Win7Pro/64


Patrick Maher
 

"If I were to look for a new planetarium software now I would look at Cart du Ciel which people seem to be happy with."

While I do agree that StellariumScope is 'quirky' and can be frustratingly unstable at times, I do have more successes with it than not.  Stellarium, however, is a fine program.  I'll agree that its user interface takes a bit of getting used to but the learning curve is rather small.  When I look at the user interfaces of Stellarium, CdC and Starry Night...  I prefer Stellarium.  That being said, Stellarium might be the smallest software package of all three so I find it to be the fastest, most responsive.  

On the other hand, I'm going to go against all those who love CdC.  I'll start with the positive...  it does play well with ASCOM.  That is it.  The program itself is clunky and dog slow.  It bogs down every computer I own including my desktop graphics computer (for video editing and photography editing) when I attempt to turn up/on all the options or even most of the options.  The only way to make the program respond reasonably well is to turn down all of the options to minimums including graphic quality.  On my Windows tablet that I use in the field for astronomy, CdC is so slow and so clunky that it is unusable.  Even at the highest/best settings on my fast desktop computer, the graphics are clunky and poor.  Where Stellarium looks quite similar to my sky, CdC is like a graphical display from the 1980's of my sky.  I suppose that if you prefer reading old physical black and white sky charts, you might feel right at home with the graphics of CdC because that is what it looks like.  The user interface of CdC reminds me of a typical Windows program in the 1990's.  As far as the graphical appearance of the sky, I prefer a more realistic looking sky interface.  I have tried to give CdC a fair run, though, by spending a few consecutive nights of forcing myself to use CdC and I still could not get used it or nor like it even a little bit.  

For ASCOM purposes, I use Stellarium the most (with StellariumScope, of course)...  and then I will occasionally use Starry Night Pro Plus 8.  On a very rare occasion, I use CdC to see if perhaps I was being too harsh in my critique of the program but I quickly realize that I was not.  I always go back to Stellarium.  Incidentally, I find Starry Night to be very stable too.  For controlling my scope with smaller computers/tablets, however, I prefer the pared down, more streamlined Stellarium.  

When I want all the extra info and graphics, I go to Starry Night Pro Plus 8.  This program is so large that, after owning for months, I am still learning what it can do and how to utilize those features.  

CdC...  there is absolutely nothing I like about that program other than price.  Even then, I don't find it worth it.  If you have to find a program that is fairly stable because StellariumScope isn't playing nicely between your gear and your computer (and I did have some significant problems with StellariumScope in the beginning), then I suppose you need to turn to CdC.  

I'm in the process of building a small observatory at my home which will have a fairly powerful desktop computer.  My plan then is to use Starry Night Pro Plus 8 for ASCOM purposes because it is more stable than StellariumScope and then use Stellarium for general observing/info purposes since the program is so fast.  

Patrick


--
Explore Scientific iEXOS-100 and EXOS-2GT (non-PMC)
Explore Scientific ED 102mm Refractor


Wes Mcdonald
 

Chris and JB

Stellarium....haha.  I prefer it to CdC.  Different folks, different strokes I guess.  Stellarium scope might be a steaming pile but it works well for me.  All this stuff tanks occasionally.  But of course it's windows.

Plate solving....apt integrates plate solving.  A friend of mine got it running pretty easily and calls it PFM... Basically pure magic.  I have it loaded up but haven't had time to try it.  Another friend uses astro tortilla.  It too is magic but apparently a big pain to get running.

Apt.... Integrates nicely with stellarium.  After slewing to an object in stellarium you can import the scope position into apt.  Or you can use apt to find a host of objects and it will slew the mount.  Stellarium faithfully shows the scope icon on the screen.   Apt also will display the object extent in the preview window and overlay your camera fov.

JB it is true that by going serial you leave your PC wifi free to join your home LAN.  The beauty of this is that you can then use sky Safari on your phone as a remote wireless hand set.  It is a beautiful thing.  SS has so many features.. It also shows camera fov and a telrad reticle, has variable speed LRUD buttons and has a nice search feature.  It also imports comet and asteroid position data and satellite data, informs you of visible satellite passes.  And it plays nice background music.  Not to mention that it has a virtual window view of the sky so you can locate those things you want to view in the general sky direction so you know where you are about to slew to.  And it has indicator arrows to help you find the object of you lose the bubble on where it ought to be.  Best of all when you are finish using it to, for example, center an object, you just blank the screen and put the phone in your pocket.  When it's time to use it again you just open your phone and SS resyncs and continues.

Wes

--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


 

Chris,
 
I bought my EXOS2 from Steve as well.  Good guy, and very helpful.
 
Re: Integration... Yes, that's the fun bit.  Integrating user-defined mix of optics, mechanical hardware, electromechanical hardware, electronics, and signal transport, with a mix of commercial and non-commercial software (with documentation quality all over the map). 
 
When you think about the stack that attempts to point the scope, and then bring back an image for you, it's a lot.  And then you discover that you're not pointed correctly - or you are, but your stars are squiggles of some kind - and you get to try to figure out what in that integration stack is the problem, based solely on the offending image.  Software config issue? Loose guidescope screw? Signal transport issue?  Mount not adjusted?  The list goes on.  Good times. :-)
 
Steve did suggest APT to me too, but BYN is focused on the camera I have, so I stayed with it.  I do have plate solving integrated (AT).  The BYN side of the integration was easy.  Getting AT working was a pain, mostly due to out of date doc and config advice, but that's sorted out now.  Works very well.
 
- Bob
 
--
Mounts: ES PMC-8 EXOS2
Scopes: SV 102EDT, ZWO 60/280 Guide
Cameras:  Nikon D5300, Altair GPCAM2-IMX224C
Software: ASCOM, CdC, AstroTortilla, BYN Pro, Sharpcap, PHD2
Computer:  Thinkpad x230, Win7Pro/64


Chris Tardif
 

Ouch....  😊

 

Chris

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Wes Mcdonald
Sent: June 14, 2019 8:41 AM
To: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Expected tracking times *Unguided

 

Chris and JB

 

Stellarium....haha.  I prefer it to CdC.  Different folks, different strokes I guess.  Stellarium scope might be a steaming pile but it works well for me.  All this stuff tanks occasionally.  But of course it's windows.

 

Plate solving....apt integrates plate solving.  A friend of mine got it running pretty easily and calls it PFM... Basically pure magic.  I have it loaded up but haven't had time to try it.  Another friend uses astro tortilla.  It too is magic but apparently a big pain to get running.

 

Apt.... Integrates nicely with stellarium.  After slewing to an object in stellarium you can import the scope position into apt.  Or you can use apt to find a host of objects and it will slew the mount.  Stellarium faithfully shows the scope icon on the screen.   Apt also will display the object extent in the preview window and overlay your camera fov.

 

JB it is true that by going serial you leave your PC wifi free to join your home LAN.  The beauty of this is that you can then use sky Safari on your phone as a remote wireless hand set.  It is a beautiful thing.  SS has so many features.. It also shows camera fov and a telrad reticle, has variable speed LRUD buttons and has a nice search feature.  It also imports comet and asteroid position data and satellite data, informs you of visible satellite passes.  And it plays nice background music.  Not to mention that it has a virtual window view of the sky so you can locate those things you want to view in the general sky direction so you know where you are about to slew to.  And it has indicator arrows to help you find the object of you lose the bubble on where it ought to be.  Best of all when you are finish using it to, for example, center an object, you just blank the screen and put the phone in your pocket.  When it's time to use it again you just open your phone and SS resyncs and continues.

 

Wes


--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired

 


Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering
 

On Fri, Jun 14, 2019 at 07:30 AM, Chris Tardif wrote:
I tried it unsuccessfully and it left me immensely frustrated.  I found Stellarium itself to be rather unintuitive and you need a twitchy bit of code called “Stellarium-Scope” to make ASCOM talk to it.  I had no luck with it. 
Hi Chris,

My experience with Stellarium was exactly as yours was 3 years ago when I first tried it with the PMC-Eight. I could never really get it to work right or be reliable. I have used Cartes du Ciel (CdC) for over 10 years now and it just works. It can be a bit of a learning curve depending on your experience with planetarium programs, but for me, it has the right level of detail, I prefer a more chart "looking" interface versus the "real sky" interface that Stellarium and other programs have today because of the performance and reduced overhead that CdC provides. That plus CdC supports all the professional catalogs I use in my work such as the UCAC4, URAT1, and MPC Asteroid catalogs. We use CdC at the Mark Slade Remote Observatory as our primary navigation program. The most recent beta test version of CdC has some great added features and has worked well in my testing. As Wes said, different strokes for different folks! 
 
--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


Chris Tardif
 

Well said....

 

Am I correct in thinking I can use Stellarium to talk to ATP without ASCOM.  Then APT will guide the mount with info it pulls from Stellarium so I don’t need to control the mount from Stellarium.

 

\hris

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> on behalf of pwmaher via Groups.Io <pwmaher@...>
Sent: Friday, June 14, 2019 8:32:49 AM
To: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Expected tracking times *Unguided
 
"If I were to look for a new planetarium software now I would look at Cart du Ciel which people seem to be happy with."

While I do agree that StellariumScope is 'quirky' and can be frustratingly unstable at times, I do have more successes with it than not.  Stellarium, however, is a fine program.  I'll agree that its user interface takes a bit of getting used to but the learning curve is rather small.  When I look at the user interfaces of Stellarium, CdC and Starry Night...  I prefer Stellarium.  That being said, Stellarium might be the smallest software package of all three so I find it to be the fastest, most responsive.  

On the other hand, I'm going to go against all those who love CdC.  I'll start with the positive...  it does play well with ASCOM.  That is it.  The program itself is clunky and dog slow.  It bogs down every computer I own including my desktop graphics computer (for video editing and photography editing) when I attempt to turn up/on all the options or even most of the options.  The only way to make the program respond reasonably well is to turn down all of the options to minimums including graphic quality.  On my Windows tablet that I use in the field for astronomy, CdC is so slow and so clunky that it is unusable.  Even at the highest/best settings on my fast desktop computer, the graphics are clunky and poor.  Where Stellarium looks quite similar to my sky, CdC is like a graphical display from the 1980's of my sky.  I suppose that if you prefer reading old physical black and white sky charts, you might feel right at home with the graphics of CdC because that is what it looks like.  The user interface of CdC reminds me of a typical Windows program in the 1990's.  As far as the graphical appearance of the sky, I prefer a more realistic looking sky interface.  I have tried to give CdC a fair run, though, by spending a few consecutive nights of forcing myself to use CdC and I still could not get used it or nor like it even a little bit.  

For ASCOM purposes, I use Stellarium the most (with StellariumScope, of course)...  and then I will occasionally use Starry Night Pro Plus 8.  On a very rare occasion, I use CdC to see if perhaps I was being too harsh in my critique of the program but I quickly realize that I was not.  I always go back to Stellarium.  Incidentally, I find Starry Night to be very stable too.  For controlling my scope with smaller computers/tablets, however, I prefer the pared down, more streamlined Stellarium.  

When I want all the extra info and graphics, I go to Starry Night Pro Plus 8.  This program is so large that, after owning for months, I am still learning what it can do and how to utilize those features.  

CdC...  there is absolutely nothing I like about that program other than price.  Even then, I don't find it worth it.  If you have to find a program that is fairly stable because StellariumScope isn't playing nicely between your gear and your computer (and I did have some significant problems with StellariumScope in the beginning), then I suppose you need to turn to CdC.  

I'm in the process of building a small observatory at my home which will have a fairly powerful desktop computer.  My plan then is to use Starry Night Pro Plus 8 for ASCOM purposes because it is more stable than StellariumScope and then use Stellarium for general observing/info purposes since the program is so fast.  

Patrick


--
Explore Scientific iEXOS-100 and EXOS-2GT (non-PMC)
Explore Scientific ED 102mm Refractor


Wes Mcdonald
 

Chris. I'm not sure how stellarium communicates to apt if not for ascom.  I will fool with it next week.  Kinda think it's all via ascom tho.  
Wes

--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Wes Mcdonald
 

Chris

Been thinking about stellarium and apt.  There is no doubt the data that gets loaded from stellarium to apt comes through POTH.  Stellarium connects to stellariumscope by sending it's data to an IP address on the local Host to a port number monitored by stellariumscope.  Stellariumscope mediates that data and sends it to poth using ascom methods.   Apt as I recall does not really know about stellarium.  It has a key sequence that reads the scope position.  Apt is connected to poth, only.  Thus it must be sending a position request via poth.   

Having said that, apt performs guiding by employing PHD2 which has been put into server mode.  Thus it has a direct connection to PHD2.  I say this because it proves a point that might illustrate a rule....that it can interface directly. But I don't remember seeing anything about stellarium having a server mode. It certainly does not natively talk ascom (which is why you need stellariumscope as an intermediate piece of bridge sofrware for stellarium to work with ascom).

What I can't remember without going to the software is if apt can get from stellarium a user selected target that the user has not yet Slewed to.  Ascom no doubt would not know what the user was looking at in the stellarium screen...it should just be getting scope position and status via its method calls to the ascom scope driver.  

Wes

--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Chris Tardif
 

I found this video that walks through plate-solving, APT and Stellarium.  It was quite easy to set up.  I have Stellarium running on my main PC in the my office with APT communicating to it from the little PC I use to control the scope.  APT can then aim the scope based data from the plate-solving.

 

....this is quite slick actually

Chris

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> on behalf of Wes Mcdonald <wesmcd6@...>
Sent: Saturday, June 15, 2019 9:20:57 AM
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Expected tracking times *Unguided
 
Chris

Been thinking about stellarium and apt.  There is no doubt the data that gets loaded from stellarium to apt comes through POTH.  Stellarium connects to stellariumscope by sending it's data to an IP address on the local Host to a port number monitored by stellariumscope.  Stellariumscope mediates that data and sends it to poth using ascom methods.   Apt as I recall does not really know about stellarium.  It has a key sequence that reads the scope position.  Apt is connected to poth, only.  Thus it must be sending a position request via poth.   

Having said that, apt performs guiding by employing PHD2 which has been put into server mode.  Thus it has a direct connection to PHD2.  I say this because it proves a point that might illustrate a rule....that it can interface directly. But I don't remember seeing anything about stellarium having a server mode. It certainly does not natively talk ascom (which is why you need stellariumscope as an intermediate piece of bridge sofrware for stellarium to work with ascom).

What I can't remember without going to the software is if apt can get from stellarium a user selected target that the user has not yet Slewed to.  Ascom no doubt would not know what the user was looking at in the stellarium screen...it should just be getting scope position and status via its method calls to the ascom scope driver.  

Wes

--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Chris Tardif
 

For my own sanity I had put this together....I think it’s right.   

 

I am becoming a fan of Stellarium.  Yesterday I realized Stellarium doesn’t have to control the scope, it just needs to interact with APT to refine where to point.  ATP can aim the scope just fine.  If the sky ever clears up I’ll give it a try.

 

If anyone wants the Visio file it lives here: https://1drv.ms/f/s!AsK04VcMsrrHjfs6JoQ5MBUUL1LeWA

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

 


From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> on behalf of Chris Tardif <christardif@...>
Sent: Saturday, June 15, 2019 2:21:16 PM
To: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Expected tracking times *Unguided
 

I found this video that walks through plate-solving, APT and Stellarium.  It was quite easy to set up.  I have Stellarium running on my main PC in the my office with APT communicating to it from the little PC I use to control the scope.  APT can then aim the scope based data from the plate-solving.

 

....this is quite slick actually

Chris

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io <MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io> on behalf of Wes Mcdonald <wesmcd6@...>
Sent: Saturday, June 15, 2019 9:20:57 AM
To: MAIN@espmc-eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Expected tracking times *Unguided
 
Chris

Been thinking about stellarium and apt.  There is no doubt the data that gets loaded from stellarium to apt comes through POTH.  Stellarium connects to stellariumscope by sending it's data to an IP address on the local Host to a port number monitored by stellariumscope.  Stellariumscope mediates that data and sends it to poth using ascom methods.   Apt as I recall does not really know about stellarium.  It has a key sequence that reads the scope position.  Apt is connected to poth, only.  Thus it must be sending a position request via poth.   

Having said that, apt performs guiding by employing PHD2 which has been put into server mode.  Thus it has a direct connection to PHD2.  I say this because it proves a point that might illustrate a rule....that it can interface directly. But I don't remember seeing anything about stellarium having a server mode. It certainly does not natively talk ascom (which is why you need stellariumscope as an intermediate piece of bridge sofrware for stellarium to work with ascom).

What I can't remember without going to the software is if apt can get from stellarium a user selected target that the user has not yet Slewed to.  Ascom no doubt would not know what the user was looking at in the stellarium screen...it should just be getting scope position and status via its method calls to the ascom scope driver.  

Wes

--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Wes Mcdonald
 

Chris

Nice drawing!.  Turns out you are correct, APT communicates with Stellarium directly via TCP/IP over the local host, 127.0.0.1:8090.

Stellarium also connects to StellariumScope directly via TCP/IP over the local host 127.0.0.1:XXXX where XXXX is ports 10001, 10002, 10003 for slew, sync, and cancel.  So your drawing is correct if amended to add an IP connection between Stellarium and StellariumScope.  Not sure HTTPS is the correct protocol to show on chart.

I should note the Stellarium, APT and Stellarium can be running on different computers on your LAN if that is helpful.  It might be for the case where there is a computer on the mount and one in your study.  


wes



--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Chris Tardif
 

Which is what I do.  You’re right...it’s not HTTPS...that’s my day job. Dare I sniff the wire and watch the traffic? 😊

...maybe later.

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Wes Mcdonald
Sent: June 16, 2019 4:24 PM
To: MAIN@ESPMC-Eight.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ESPMC-Eight] Expected tracking times *Unguided

 

Chris

 

Nice drawing!.  Turns out you are correct, APT communicates with Stellarium directly via TCP/IP over the local host, 127.0.0.1:8090.

 

Stellarium also connects to StellariumScope directly via TCP/IP over the local host 127.0.0.1:XXXX where XXXX is ports 10001, 10002, 10003 for slew, sync, and cancel.  So your drawing is correct if amended to add an IP connection between Stellarium and StellariumScope.  Not sure HTTPS is the correct protocol to show on chart.

 

I should note the Stellarium, APT and Stellarium can be running on different computers on your LAN if that is helpful.  It might be for the case where there is a computer on the mount and one in your study.  

 

 

wes

 

 


--
Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired

 


JB1983
 
Edited

So I got my USB hub and serial cable in today and attempted to get things working.

Ascom worked great when using wifi to the module but I had major issues with serial method.

The drivers wouldnt take at first, I realized this when I see the USB com port sitting in other devices in device manager.  I downloaded the latest FTDI drivers and uploaded them manually and got them to work so both the com port and the USB bus converter and both running the latest drivers.

But when I run ascom connection manager and change the connection from wifi to serial, it times out on me and says timeout no received data.

I tried a bunch of stuff including changing com ports and still nothing. As I far as I can tell the drivers are installed correctly but it's not communicating with the pmc 8 module.

Any ideas?  The only other thing I noticed is there was another unknown device but it was an ethernet device and I managed to track down the Atheros drivers for it, I'm sure its unrelated to this issue.

Other than that, I'm stumped.  Ascom tries to connect and timeouts within a few seconds with no recieved data.


 

Are the serial port speed, etc. params correct?

Here's a couple of screen shots from Device Manager to confirm.


--
Mounts: ES PMC-8 EXOS2
Scopes: SV 102EDT, ZWO 60/280 Guide
Cameras:  Nikon D5300, Altair GPCAM2-IMX224C
Software: ASCOM, CdC, AstroTortilla, BYN Pro, Sharpcap, PHD2
Computer:  Thinkpad x230, Win7Pro/64


JB1983
 

Thanks Robert. You know what, I think I just realized that ascom wants 115200 and the default com port parameters default to 9600.  That could very well be the cause of the issue right there.

Other than the, my driver data looks identical. I'll make sure the rate is set properly tonight and see if it connects. If not, it could very well be the cable. I know that getting a cable with FTDI that actually works can be a hassle in itself.


Jerry Hubbell - Explore Scientific VP Engineering
 

On Thu, Jun 20, 2019 at 12:15 PM, JB1983 wrote:
I think I just realized that ascom wants 115200 and the default com port parameters default to 9600.  That could very well be the cause of the issue right there.
It doesn't matter what the default BAUD rate is set to on the port driver configuration, the ASCOM driver configures the connection to 115,200 BAUD prior to making the connection. My default is set to 9600 on the port driver also.
 
--
Jerry Hubbell
Vice President of Engineering

Explore Scientific, LLC.
jrh at explorescientific.com

www.explorescientificusa.com
1010 S. 48th Street
Springdale, AR 72762
1-866-252-3811

Author: Scientific Astrophotography: How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data
             Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers: Using High-Powered Telescopes From Home


Mark Slade Remote Observatory (MSRO) IAU MPC W54 Equipment
Wilderness, VA
Mounts
: ES PMC-Eight G11 + Telescope Drive Master (TDM)
Scopes: ES 165 FPL-53 ED APO CF, ES 102 FCD100 ED APO CF
Cameras:  QHY174M-GPS + FW, QHY163C
Misc: 3-inch 0.7x Focal Reducer Field Flattener, Filters: Luminance,
Red, V-band Photometric, Diffuser, 200 lpmm Spectral Grating

Software: MaxIm DL 6, Cartes du Ciel, Astrometrica, AstroImageJ, AutoStakkert!


JB1983
 

I'm gonna give it a whirl in about an hour and see if I can figure it out.   I'm willing to bet it's the cable.  Sounds like most people have issues with cable being the culprit more than anything.  I'll try deleting the drivers and re installing and see if I'm missing anything else 


Wes Mcdonald
 

JB

If it don't work it's gonna be reverse pin out if the connector.....assuming all else is ok.  You'll need a null modem plug

Wes

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Wes, Southport NC
PMC-8, ES ED 127, 10" LX200GPS, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG
Electrical Engineer, Retired