#iEXOS-100 Dec Balancing without guiding #iEXOS-100


Parag Modi
 

Hello,

I wanted ask about how precise does the DEC balancing needs to be when you're not guiding?  I follow the iEXOS 100 manual and get my DEC axis to not move when I get with RA axis horizontal.  If I push it about 30 degrees up or down, it goes out of balance.  I have no troubles getting my RA balanced throughout the rotation, but I can't get my DEC balanced the same.  The reason I'm asking is once I go past the meridian for about 30 minutes, my target keeps drifting south no matter what.  I'm not guiding yet due to a DOA guide camera and hopefully I'll start guiding soon once a more reputable guide camera (ASI120 Mini) arrives.  But in general, I wanted to know how good the DEC balance needs to be.

Any guidance will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
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Parag Modi

Mounts: ES iEXOS-100
Scopes: APS-C Sigma 18-300 mm
Cameras:  Nikon D7200 (Unmodified)
Misc: Bahtinov Mask, K&F Concept Clear night filter
Software: ExploreStars, Stellarium


Parag Modi
 

Any comments on this?
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Parag Modi

Mounts: ES iEXOS-100
Scopes: APS-C Sigma 18-300 mm
Cameras:  Nikon D7200 (Unmodified)
Misc: Bahtinov Mask, K&F Concept Clear night filter
Software: ExploreStars, Stellarium


Wes Mcdonald
 

Parag:

Don't know why the balance is difficult.  Are you using a newtonian?  If there is a mass that is changing its relation to the center of rotation in a way that is not balanced, such as a heavy thing hung on the eyepiece holder of a newt, the scope may change balance with rotation. I believe, although I have not tried to use my newt, ever, that the newt eyepiece should be straight up so that its weight is counteracted by the counterbalance weight exactly.  This of course makes visuals a pain, but is fine for photography.  I am pretty sure folks have posted images of their rigs with this configuration for their newt. Then all that is required is to slide the scope forward or backward in the saddle to get the DEC in balance.   I don't know.  You just have to fiddle it.

As for your question as to balance requirements.  It needs to be balanced no more than is required for the clutch not to slip and the motor not to stall. 

Wes. 

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Wes, Southport NC
EXos2-GT PMC-8, iExos 100, ESG11
ES ED 127+MoonLite Focuser, 10" LX200GPS+ MoonLite focuser+wedge, Astro-Tech 8" Newt, ETX-90, 60mm no-name guide scope ~ 260mm FL
Polemaster, Orion ST-80 and SAG, ZWO 290MM, D5300 astro modified, ASI071 cooled OSC, ASI MM290 guide camera
Nina, Bootcamped Mac Mini control computer, RDP to iMAC
110 amp hour lead acid deep discharge battery for field power
Electrical Engineer, Retired


Parag Modi
 

Wes,

Thank your feedback.  I am still using just plain old DSLR with a zoom lens, no telescopes.  I'm slowly driving into getting into the basics of guiding so adjusted my mounting hardware to allow my dslr and have a 30mm guidescope and camera to the font of the setup but guide scope below the mounting plane to avoid getting in the way of my zoom lens.  With that arrangement, I can balance the gear when the RA is positioned nearly horizontal.  If i push the setup about 30 degrees above or below the horizon, then I get it unbalanced either towards the camera in the back or the guidescope in the front.  I didn't notice any shifting during my unguided shoot last weekend (M31 from my backyard in AZ) but I wanted to get a good understanding of the setup techniques.
--
Parag Modi

Mounts: ES iEXOS-100
Scopes: APS-C Sigma 18-300 mm
Cameras:  Nikon D7200 (Unmodified)
Misc: Bahtinov Mask, K&F Concept Clear night filter
Software: ExploreStars, Stellarium